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Overview

I have a data frame called df1 containing two columns: (1) Urbanisaiton_index (contains **four sublevels (1-4); and (2) Canopy_Index

For the data analysis, I want to conduct a single ANOVA to distinguish the overall variance for within and between sublevel groups for Urbanisation_index for differences in Canopy_Index. The idea is to distinguish if different levels of urbanisation affects the extent of canopy cover in a tree species Quercus petraea.

In order to conduct the ANOVA, I need to flip the columns in the data frame and make a new data frame. I would like the columns headings to be 1, 2, 3, 4 to represent the differences in the four groups or/sublevels of the Urbanisation_index. Secondly, I would like to list the Canopy_Index values belonging to each sublevel into their specific sublevel column (see desired results).

Once the desired new data frame has been constructed, the data will be grouped in the right format to conduct an ANOVA.

I have tried many different ways such as transpose, but I cannot figure out how to list the urbansation_index sublevels (1-4) as column headings and compile their associated Canopy_Index values (i.e. the number of rows of the Canopy_Index per Urbanisation_index sublevel) underneath in their specific columns.

For instance, if the data frame was filtered for Urbanisation_index, sublevel 1, there might be 6 observations (5, 5, 5, 5, 55, 55) for the Canopy_Index, and I would like them to be listed underneath column heading 1 in the new data frame as shown below.

enter image description here

If anyone can help, I would be deeply appreciative.

Rcode

##transpose
  t(df1)

Desired Result

 1   2   3   4
65  55   5  35
45  85  55  45
75  75  15  25

Data

    structure(list(Urbanisation_index = c(2, 2, 4, 4, 3, 3, 4, 4, 
4, 2, 4, 3, 4, 4, 1, 1, 1, 1, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 2, 
2, 2, 2, 4, 4, 3, 2, 2, 2, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 1, 4, 4, 4, 
4, 4, 4, 4), Canopy_Index = c(65, 75, 55, 85, 85, 85, 95, 85, 
85, 45, 65, 75, 75, 65, 35, 75, 65, 85, 65, 95, 75, 75, 75, 65, 
75, 65, 75, 95, 95, 85, 85, 85, 75, 75, 65, 85, 75, 65, 55, 95, 
95, 95, 95, 45, 55, 35, 55, 65, 95, 95, 45, 65, 45, 55)), row.names = c(NA, 
-54L), class = c("data.table", "data.frame"), .internal.selfref = <pointer: 0x1030086e0>, index = structure(integer(0), "`__Species`" = integer(0)))
  • could you please explain a little bit more what you meant by "and the aggregate rows for the Canopy_Index per sublevel are listed beneath column heading" how are you intending to aggregate? sum of rows by Urbanisation_index and Canopy_Index , like a contingency table? – Phill Jan 22 at 19:24
  • The dataframe contains two columns. In the Urbanisation_index column, there are four sublevels 1-4. I want the column headings to be 1, 2, 3, and 4 to represent the sublevels of the Urbanisation_index column. Then I want to put all the Canopy_Index values contained in each sublevel into it's associated sublevel column – Alice Hobbs Jan 22 at 19:42
  • and your care only about unique values for each sub_level? say if 1 has 55, 33, 55 in the resulting column 1 the only values will be 33, 55. – Phill Jan 22 at 19:51
  • For instance, sublevel 1 in the Urbanisation_index contains 6 observations for the Canopy_Index: 5, 5, 5, 5, 55, and 55. Therefore, I want to list these 6 observations in column 1. The observations in each sublevel will be different, but I will fill the gaps with zeros or NA's. I re-edited this post to help – Alice Hobbs Jan 22 at 20:04
1

Using the data you provided:

data<-structure(list(Urbanisation_index = c(2, 2, 4, 4, 3, 3, 4, 4, 
                                            4, 2, 4, 3, 4, 4, 1, 1, 1, 1, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 2, 
                                            2, 2, 2, 4, 4, 3, 2, 2, 2, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 1, 4, 4, 4, 
                                            4, 4, 4, 4), 
                     Canopy_Index = c(65, 75, 55, 85, 85, 85, 95, 85, 
                                      85, 45, 65, 75, 75, 65, 35, 75, 65, 85, 65, 95, 75, 75, 75, 65, 
                                      75, 65, 75, 95, 95, 85, 85, 85, 75, 75, 65, 85, 75, 65, 55, 95, 
                                      95, 95, 95, 45, 55, 35, 55, 65, 95, 95, 45, 65, 45, 55)), 
                row.names = c(NA, 
                              -54L), 
                class = c("data.table", "data.frame"), 
                index = structure(integer(0), "`__Species`" = integer(0)))

Loading the packages

library(tidyr)
library(dplyr)
library(purrr)

First group the values of canopy indexes by urbanisation index and get a list of all the vales and the append them adjusting for length.

a<-data %>%
  group_by(Urbanisation_index) %>%
  summarise(Canopy_Indexes=paste(Canopy_Index, collapse = "-")) %>%
  spread(key = Urbanisation_index, value = Canopy_Indexes) %>%
  map(.f = ~ separate_rows(data.frame(.), 1, sep = "-"))

a <- lapply(a, function(x){
  x1<-x[,1]
  length(x1) <- max(sapply(a, nrow))
  x1
}) %>% data.frame()

colnames(a) <- paste("sub_level", 1:4, sep = "_")
a

Here is another solution more compact, but since I came out with the previous first didn't want to waste it :)

b <- map(split(data, data$Urbanisation_index), 2)


b <- lapply(b, function(x){
  x1<-x
  length(x1) <- max(sapply(b, length))
  x1
}) %>% data.frame()

colnames(b) <- paste("sub_level", 1:4, sep = "_")
b

Result:

   sub_level_1 sub_level_2 sub_level_3 sub_level_4
1           35          65          85          55
2           75          75          85          85
3           65          45          75          95
4           85          95          65          85
5           55          85          95          85
6           55          85          75          65
7           NA          85          75          75
8           NA          85          75          65
9           NA          75          65          75
10          NA          65          75          75
11          NA          95          65          65
12          NA          95          75          95
13          NA          95          95          95
14          NA          95          65          45
15          NA          45          NA          65
16          NA          55          NA          45
17          NA          35          NA          55

Hope this helps

  • Thank you so much, Phil, I really do appreciate your help – Alice Hobbs Jan 22 at 21:47

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