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I'm writing some code to show inheritance. In doing so, i want to illustrate it by having a base class that contains a vector of pointers that can hold object pointers of the derived class.

I'm getting this error that the "Child class is undeclared" in the base function "void addChild(string nm, string sm)" in the Parents class (base class). I do understand that it maybe out of scope in the base class. Can someone provide me with a solution to this where i can still be able to instantiate an object of the derived class from within the base class. I want to have everything done within the base class. Please clarify if this is ok and is a good practice. If not, please suggest some ideas.

Here's my code:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

class Parents // base class
{
    vector <Parents*> fam;

protected:
    string firstName;
    string lastName;
public:
    Parents()
    {
        //default constructor              
    }
    Parents(string fn, string ln)
    {
        firstName = fn;
        lastName = ln;
    }
    void displayChildren()
    {
        if (fam.empty())
        {
            cout << "Vector is empty" << endl;
        }
        else
        {
            for (unsigned int i = 0; i < fam.size(); i++)
            {
                std::cout, fam.at(i);
            }
        }
    }
    void displayParentsInfo(Parents& const par)
    {
        cout << "First name : " << par.firstName << endl;
        cout << "Last name  : " << par.lastName << endl;
    }
    void addChild(string nm, string sm)
    {
        Child* c1 = new Child(nm, sm);      
        fam.push_back(c1);
    }
};

class Child : public Parents //derived class
{
    string firstname;
    string surname;

public:
    Child()
    {
        //default constructor
    }
    Child(string a, string b)
    {
        firstname = a;
        surname = b;
    }
    //~Child()
    //{
        //destructor called
    //}
    void displayChildInfo(Child & const c)
    {
        cout << "Child's firstname : " << c.firstname;
        cout << "Child's surname   : " << c.surname;
    }
};

Cheers!

2
  • Does the Child class need to be defined before the Parent class which consumes it.
    – Lex
    Jan 23, 2019 at 3:25
  • Yes. Realized that. So i simply had to just write the declaration in the base class body and use the base class name and scope operator when defining the function outside of the base class, and under the derived class. Jan 24, 2019 at 10:57

1 Answer 1

1

Just move the definition of the function out of the definition of the class:

class Parents // base class
{
  ...
  void addChild(string nm, string sm);
};

class Child : public Parents //derived class
{
  ...
};

void Parents::addChild(string nm, string sm)
{
    Parents* c1 = new Child(nm, sm);      
    fam.push_back(c1);
}

As for good practice, it might be better to have a non-member function that prepares the Child and returns a pointer to it, and add something like:

void Parents::addToFam(Parents* c1)
{
    fam.push_back(c1);
}
4
  • Oh right. I see. Didn't think of that. Thanks buddy! i'll try that out Jan 22, 2019 at 23:44
  • I have one more question. What if i wanted to add another overloaded function to it like this : void addChild(Child& c); This one now gives me an error Jan 22, 2019 at 23:51
  • I think i figured it out. Just cast it into a base class pointer Jan 22, 2019 at 23:54
  • So it will be addChild(Parent* p). The parent pointer holds the address of the derived object Jan 22, 2019 at 23:55

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