8

Why the following query:

SELECT * FROM myTable WHERE id=1=0

returns all rows from myTable except one which has id=1?

myTable content:

+----+-------+
| id | value |
+----+-------+
| 1  | dog   |
| 2  | cat   |
| 3  | parrot|
+----+-------+

Now run: SELECT * FROM myTable WHERE id=1=0

Output:

+----+-------+
| id | value |
+----+-------+
| 2  | cat   |
| 3  | parrot|
+----+-------+
  • 4
    Evaluates as WHERE (id = 1) = 0... When ID = 1 it ends up as 1 which <> 0. – jarlh Jan 23 at 12:25
  • 2
    ... and in MySQL 0 equals false. id = 1 is an expression that results in a boolean value (true, false or null), so MySQL expects a boolean on the right side of = . It finds 0, which it interprets as false. – Thorsten Kettner Jan 23 at 12:37
  • @jarlh I have used your logic as answer. As you didn't posted as answer. – Muhammad Waheed Jan 23 at 13:21
9

The reason is that the logic should be being evaluated as:

WHERE (id = 1) = 0

This is equivalent to:

WHERE (id = 1) "is false"

Or:

WHERE id <> 1

Try running these examples:

select 1=1=0, 1=2=3, 1=1=0
7

Default operator precedence works as follows :

WHERE (ID=1)=0

Which resutls false in case of id=1

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