18

Consider the following toy example:

use std::cmp::Ordering;

pub trait SimpleOrder {
    fn key(&self) -> u32;
}

impl PartialOrd for dyn SimpleOrder {
    fn partial_cmp(&self, other: &dyn SimpleOrder) -> Option<Ordering> {
        Some(self.cmp(other))
    }
}

impl Ord for dyn SimpleOrder {
    fn cmp(&self, other: &dyn SimpleOrder) -> Ordering {
        self.key().cmp(&other.key())
    }
}

impl PartialEq for dyn SimpleOrder {
    fn eq(&self, other: &dyn SimpleOrder) -> bool {
        self.key() == other.key()
    }
}

impl Eq for SimpleOrder {}

This doesn't compile. It claims there is a lifetime issue in the implementation for partial_cmp:

error[E0495]: cannot infer an appropriate lifetime due to conflicting requirements
 --> src/main.rs:9:23
  |
9 |         Some(self.cmp(other))
  |                       ^^^^^
  |
note: first, the lifetime cannot outlive the anonymous lifetime #2 defined on the method body at 8:5...
 --> src/main.rs:8:5
  |
8 | /     fn partial_cmp(&self, other: &dyn SimpleOrder) -> Option<Ordering> {
9 | |         Some(self.cmp(other))
10| |     }
  | |_____^
note: ...so that the declared lifetime parameter bounds are satisfied
 --> src/main.rs:9:23
  |
9 |         Some(self.cmp(other))
  |                       ^^^^^
  = note: but, the lifetime must be valid for the static lifetime...
  = note: ...so that the types are compatible:
          expected std::cmp::Eq
             found std::cmp::Eq

I really don't understand this error. In particular "expected std::cmp::Eq found std::cmp::Eq" is puzzling.

If I inline the call manually it compiles fine:

fn partial_cmp(&self, other: &dyn SimpleOrder) -> Option<Ordering> {
    Some(self.key().cmp(&other.key()))
}

What's going on here?

  • 2
    This is mysterious! – E4_net_or_something_like_that Jan 23 at 14:24
  • 1
    Since we are talking about traits... 'static is probably missing somewhere? – Matthieu M. Jan 23 at 14:25
  • @MatthieuM. Why is a static lifetime required for the argument of partial_cmp but not for cmp? – E4_net_or_something_like_that Jan 23 at 14:36
  • @PeterHall: I have no idea, but I think that this may be the clue behind the "expected std::cmp::Eq found std::cmp::Eq", one has a 'static lifetime that is not shown, while the other doesn't. I am certainly looking forward to the answer of this question :D – Matthieu M. Jan 23 at 14:46
  • fn partial_cmp(&self, other: &(dyn SimpleOrder + 'static)) -> Option<Ordering> works ;) – hellow Jan 23 at 14:50
17

Trait object types have an associated lifetime bound, but it can be omitted. A full trait object type is written dyn Trait + 'a (when behind a reference, parentheses must be added around it: &(dyn Trait + 'a)).

The tricky part is that when a lifetime bound is omitted, the rules are a bit complicated.

First, we have:

impl PartialOrd for dyn SimpleOrder {

Here, the compiler infers + 'static. Lifetime parameters are never introduced on impl blocks (as of Rust 1.32.0).

Next, we have:

    fn partial_cmp(&self, other: &dyn SimpleOrder) -> Option<Ordering> {

The type of other is inferred to be &'b (dyn SimpleOrder + 'b), where 'b is an implicit lifetime parameter introduced on partial_cmp.

    fn partial_cmp<'a, 'b>(&'a self, other: &'b (dyn SimpleOrder + 'b)) -> Option<Ordering> {

So now we have that self has type &'a (dyn SimpleOrder + 'static) while other has type &'b (dyn SimpleOrder + 'b). What's the problem?

Indeed, cmp doesn't give any error, because its implementation doesn't require that the lifetime of the two trait objects be equal. Why does partial_cmp care, though?

Because partial_cmp is calling Ord::cmp. When type checking a call to a trait method, the compiler checks against the signature from the trait. Let's review that signature:

pub trait Ord: Eq + PartialOrd<Self> {
    fn cmp(&self, other: &Self) -> Ordering;

The trait requires that other be of type Self. That means that when partial_cmp calls cmp, it tries to pass a &'b (dyn SimpleOrder + 'b) to a parameter that expects a &'b (dyn SimpleOrder + 'static), because Self is dyn SimpleOrder + 'static. This conversion is not valid ('b cannot be converted to 'static), so the compiler gives an error.

So then, why is it valid to set the type of other to &'b (dyn SimpleOrder + 'b) when implementing Ord? Because &'b (dyn SimpleOrder + 'b) is a supertype of &'b (dyn SimpleOrder + 'static), and Rust lets you replace a parameter type with one of its supertypes when implementing a trait method (it makes the method strictly more general, even though it's apparently not used much in type checking).


In order to make your implementation as generic as possible, you should introduce a lifetime parameter on the impls:

use std::cmp::Ordering;

pub trait SimpleOrder {
    fn key(&self) -> u32;
}

impl<'a> PartialOrd for dyn SimpleOrder + 'a {
    fn partial_cmp(&self, other: &Self) -> Option<Ordering> {
        Some(self.cmp(other))
    }
}

impl<'a> Ord for dyn SimpleOrder + 'a {
    fn cmp(&self, other: &Self) -> Ordering {
        self.key().cmp(&other.key())
    }
}

impl<'a> PartialEq for dyn SimpleOrder + 'a {
    fn eq(&self, other: &Self) -> bool {
        self.key() == other.key()
    }
}

impl<'a> Eq for dyn SimpleOrder + 'a {}
  • 4
    That makes sense. I do believe that the error message generated by Rust should be improved though - that this is the issue isn't at all clear from the error message. – orlp Jan 23 at 15:23
  • "So now we have that self has type &(dyn SimpleOrder + 'a) while other has type &(dyn SimpleOrder + 'static)." – this should be the other way round, right? – Chronial Jan 23 at 15:23
  • 3
    The thing that is surprising to me here is that calling SimpleOrder::cmp(self, other) does not check against the signature of SimpleOrder::cmp (which would succeed), but against the signature of Ord::cmp (which fails). – Chronial Jan 23 at 15:26
  • 1
    @Chronial: I think this would warrant its own (separate) question; notably, I guess it would be possible to trigger the behavior without dyn Trait, just exploiting sub-typing with regular types containing references. – Matthieu M. Jan 23 at 15:53
  • 2
    @trentcl I remember reading somewhere that &'a T is equal to &'a (T + 'a). That does also fit the behavior of Box (non-references are 'static). Ah, found the reference: doc.rust-lang.org/reference/… – Chronial Jan 24 at 4:51

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