8

Currently I'm doing it so:

    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        Title = Properties.Resources.WindowName;
    }

How to do the same through the WPF binding?

EDIT: It still doesn't work in XAML.
Environment:VS2010, .NET 4.0, Windows 7.
Reproduction steps:
Create class library ClassLibrary1 with code:

 namespace ClassLibrary1
 {
    static public class Class1
    {
        static public string Something
        {
            get { return "something"; }
        }
    }
}

Create WPF windows application in VS2010 .NET 4.0.
Edit main window's XAML:

<Window x:Class="ahtranslator.MainWindow"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"        
    xmlns:ClassLibrary1="clr-namespace:ClassLibrary1;assembly=ClassLibrary1" 
    Title="{Binding Source={x:Static ClassLibrary1:Class1}, Path=Something}"
    Height="350" Width="525" Icon="/ahtranslator;component/Icon1.ico"    WindowStyle="SingleBorderWindow" ShowInTaskbar="False" DataContext="{Binding}">

...

Compilation error message:
MainWindow.xaml(7,130): error MC3029: 'ClassLibrary1:Class1' member is not valid because it does not have a qualifying type name.

Also I found this topic My.Resources in WPF XAML?. And it seems all should work but it doesn't.

Microsoft doesn't give description for this error message. Only another topic in help forum http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en/wpf/thread/4fe7d58d-785f-434c-bef3-31bd9e400691, which doesn't help either.

1
  • The path in this case should be inside the x:Static as the property is static, i.e. {Binding Source={x:Static ClassLibrary1:Class1.Something}}, see the syntax on the reference page. I also updated my answer which was misguided...
    – H.B.
    Sep 24 '11 at 15:48
10

In code it would look like this i think:

Binding titleBinding = new Binding("WindowName");
titleBinding.Source = Properties.Resources;
this.SetBinding(Window.Title, titleBinding);

This only makes sense if changes may occur to the title and the binding will be notified of those changes (WindowName has to either be a Dependency Property or Resources needs to implement INotifyPropertyChanged)

If Properties is a namespace (as would be the case with the default VS-generated properties) you need to declare it somewhere using xmlns & use x:Static:

<Window
   ...
   xmlns:prop="clr-namespace:App.Properties"
   Title="{Binding Source={x:Static prop:Resources.WindowName}}">

Another note: If you use the managed resources of Visual Studio you need to make sure that the access modifier of the properties is public, default is internal which will throw an exception since binding only works for public properties.

4
  • Thanks. Your last suggestion is my case, but it doesn't work. Please see EDIT: of my post. I've made it as clear as I could imagine: moved the class to different assembly and so on.
    – alehro
    Mar 26 '11 at 6:39
  • I edited my answer to give more suggestions, hopefully some of this fits your problem.
    – H.B.
    Mar 26 '11 at 12:23
  • The code behind method you list first does not work. You cannot set Properties.Resources as a binding source. "...Resources is a type, which is not valid in the given context" I tried specifying the resource key there, and it accepts it, but the binding fails. Text shows nothing Mar 2 '16 at 20:43
  • (Update) So I find myself in the same situation and stumbled upon the same question... This time the binding works, but doesn't update (when specifying a resource key) - I still can't set Properties.Resources as a binding source, and receive the same error. Oct 10 '17 at 18:14
1

just remove this:

... ;assembly=ClassLibrary1"
0

I actually have the Title in a static resource defined at the top of the application and I bind the Title and anything else I want to it

<s:String x:Key="ApplicationName">My Application</s:String>
0

Have you tried to change the access modifier of the resource from internal to public?

I have just had some problem with that right now.

    /// <summary>
    ///   Looks up a localized string similar to Has been impossible to load the configuration information.
    /// </summary>
    internal static string ERROR_NoConfigurationLoaded {
        get {
            return ResourceManager.GetString("ERROR_NoConfigurationLoaded", resourceCulture);
        }
    }

to

    /// <summary>
    ///   Looks up a localized string similar to Has been impossible to load the configuration information.
    /// </summary>
    public static string ERROR_NoConfigurationLoaded {
        get {
            return ResourceManager.GetString("ERROR_NoConfigurationLoaded", resourceCulture);
        }
    }
1
  • 1
    Yes, I have done it. Kindly look at the source code of ClassLibrary1 of my question. There is all public.
    – alehro
    Aug 1 '11 at 17:24

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