11

I am learning random algorithms, and I am currently stock in one, where I have to reverse a string that contains numbers, but I am not to reverse 1 and 0 in the string e.g, 2345678910 would be 1098765432.

Here's what I've done so far:

function split(str) {
  let temp = [];
  temp = str.split('');
  const backwards = [];
  const totalItems = str.length - 1;
  for (let i = totalItems; i >= 0; i--) {
    backwards.push(temp[i]);

  }
  return backwards.join('').toString();

}
console.log(split("10 2 3 U S A"));
console.log(split("2345678910"));

I am currently having the issue of not reversing the 10.

What am I doing wrong?

closed as unclear what you're asking by Pham Trung, גלעד ברקן, KittMedia, Graipher, Vikrant Kashyap Jan 24 at 9:40

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1
    please format you code! – MrSmith42 Jan 23 at 15:10
  • 1
    OP wants A S U 3 2 10 if I understood correctly – Pac0 Jan 23 at 15:12
  • 1
    I added the other example mentioned above the snippet into it, as already two answers (mine deleted included) missed that one. – Pac0 Jan 23 at 15:17
  • 2
    What about the string USA101001 ? Should it give 101001ASU ? – Pac0 Jan 23 at 15:22
  • 3
    I think the reversing rule is not clear. Normally 5864 would become 4685. But what 8150 should become? Certainly not 0518, but perhaps 5180 or 5810 or 1058 or else? This is not clear to me...:( – user10472446 Jan 23 at 17:06
13

You can replace 10 with a specified character which does not exist in the text, and after running the implemented algorithm replace it back with 10.

let out_of_alphabet_character = '#';
var reg_for_the_alphabet = new RegExp(out_of_alphabet_character, "g");

function specific_revert(str) {
  str = str.replace(/(10)/g, out_of_alphabet_character);
  let temp = [];
  
  temp = str.split('');
  const backwards = [];
  const totalItems = str.length - 1;
  for (let i = totalItems; i >= 0; i--) {
    backwards.push(temp[i]);
  }
  return backwards.join('').toString().replace(reg_for_the_alphabet, '10');
}
console.log(specific_revert("10 2 3 U S A"));
console.log(specific_revert("234567891010"));

  • 1
    That would be the simplest (in term of understandability) way of doing that IMHO – Pac0 Jan 23 at 15:20
  • ha ! I think it fails for complex 10 strings like my example above : USA101001 – Pac0 Jan 23 at 15:22
  • 1
    @Pac0 What should be the result for USA101001? – OmG Jan 23 at 15:24
  • We don't know yet, I presume. Need OP clarification. (but it works for both the examples given, at least) – Pac0 Jan 23 at 15:25
  • 1
    This would work, but extend it so it replaces the longest sequence of 1 and 0 characters, not just 10. – Amy Jan 23 at 15:26
3

Just check for the special case & code the normal logic or reversing as usual

    const reverse = str => {
    	let rev = "";
    	for (let i = 0; i < str.length; i++) {
        	if (str[i] === '1' && i + 1 < str.length && str[i+1] === '0') {
            	rev = '10' + rev;
                i++;
            } else rev = str[i] + rev;
        }
        
        return rev;
    }
    
    console.log(reverse("10 2 3 U S A")); // returns A S U 3 2 10
    console.log(reverse("2345678910")); // returns 1098765432

  • this code dose not work for console.log(reverse("234567891000000")) only uses for 2345678910 – mohammad javad ahmadi Jan 23 at 15:38
  • 1
    @mohammadjavadahmadi I am getting "000001098765432", which seems to be the correct value. – Danyal Imran Jan 23 at 15:40
  • 1
    @mohammadjavadahmadi No it is not... that was not a condition in the question. – Mr. Polywhirl Jan 23 at 15:44
  • 4
    OP said that he doesn't want to reverse 10, he doesn't say anything about how other values before or after 10 are affected. I don't know why would you even think that since its not even mentioned anywhere lol @mohammadjavadahmadi – Danyal Imran Jan 23 at 15:44
  • 1
    @Pac0 definitely, we need more test cases for clarity. – Danyal Imran Jan 23 at 16:14
3

You can reduce over the matched array from using a regular expression. It's more costly than a for/loop that concatenates strings, but it was fun figuring it out.

function split(str) {
  const re = /([A-Z23456789 ]+)|(10)/g
  return str.match(re).reduce((acc, c) => {

    // if the match is 10 prepend it to the accumulator
    // otherwise reverse the match and then prepend it
    acc.unshift(c === '10' ? c : [...c].reverse().join(''));
    return acc;      
  }, []).join('');
}

console.log(split('2345678910'));
console.log(split('10 2 3 U S A'));
console.log(split('2 3 U S A10'));

1

You need some pre-conditions to check each character's value.

Due to the vagueness of the question, it is reasonable to believe that the number system that OP defines consists of [2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10] and all other characters A-Z (including 0 and 1) are simply characters.

String.prototype.isNumeric = function() {
  return !isNaN(parseFloat(this)) && isFinite(this);
};

function reverse(str) {
  let tokens = [], len = str.length;
  while (len--) {
    let char = str.charAt(len);
    if (char.isNumeric()) {
      if (len > 0 && str.charAt(len - 1).isNumeric()) {
        let curr = parseInt(char, 10),
            next = parseInt(str.charAt(len - 1), 10);  
        if (curr === 0 && next === 1) {
          tokens.push(10);
          len--;
          continue;
        }
      }
    }
    tokens.push(char);
  }
  return tokens.join('');
}

console.log(reverse("10 2 3 U S A"));
console.log(reverse('2345678910'));

Output:

A S U 3 2 10
1098765432
  • for 'USA101001' it gives 11010, which looks wrong. – Pac0 Jan 23 at 15:24
  • Based on the original example: "e.g, 2345678910 would be 1098765432." – Mr. Polywhirl Jan 23 at 15:25
  • my example is a bit complex, but OP gave at least an example with letters, 10 2 3 U S A – Pac0 Jan 23 at 15:32
  • Ok, I fixed it. – Mr. Polywhirl Jan 23 at 15:39
  • this code dose not work for console.log(reverse("234567891000000")) only uses for 2345678910 – mohammad javad ahmadi Jan 23 at 15:40
1

Below is a recursive approach.

function f(s, i=0){
  if (i == s.length)
    return '';
  if (['0', '1'].includes(s[i])){
    let curr = s[i];
    while (['0', '1'].includes(s[++i]))
      curr += s[i]
    return f(s, i) + curr;
  }
  return f(s, i + 1) + s[i];
}

console.log(f('10 2 3 U S A'));
console.log(f('2345678910'));
console.log(f('USA101001'));

  • Wouldn't USA101001 be 101010ASU ? – Mr. Polywhirl Jan 23 at 15:46
  • @Mr.Polywhirl I thought sequences of 1 and 0 were not to be reversed. – elena a Jan 23 at 15:48
  • U S A 10 10 0 11 0 10 10 A S U101010ASU – Mr. Polywhirl Jan 23 at 15:49
  • @Mr.Polywhirl can you please show me where the OP indicated your interpretation is the correct one? – elena a Jan 23 at 15:51
  • Due to the vagueness of the question, it is reasonable to believe that the number system is [2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10] and all other characters A-Z (including 0 and 1) are simply characters. – Mr. Polywhirl Jan 23 at 15:54
0

Nice question so far.

You may try this recursive approach(if not changing 10 for other character not allowed):

function reverseKeepTen(str, arr = []) {
	const tenIdx = str.indexOf('10');
  
  if (!str.length) {
  	return arr.join('');
  }
  
  if (tenIdx === -1) {
    return [...str.split('').reverse(), ...arr].join('');
  } else {
  	const digitsBefore = str.slice(0, tenIdx);
    
  	const arrBefore = digitsBefore ? [...digitsBefore.split(''), 10].reverse() : [10];
  	return reverseKeepTen(str.slice(tenIdx + 2), [...arrBefore, ...arr])
  }
};


console.log(reverseKeepTen('101234105678910')) // 109876510432110
console.log(reverseKeepTen('12341056789')) // 98765104321
console.log(reverseKeepTen('1012345')) // 5432110
console.log(reverseKeepTen('5678910')) // 1098765
console.log(reverseKeepTen('10111101')) // 11011110

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