0

I am using a rich text editor to type formatted text, as shown below:

enter image description here

I can get the HTML formatted text, which would look like this:

<p>This is my rich HTML Text</p>

Now I want to pass this HTML formatted text to my controller and my controller would put the text in an email and send it to the receiver.

The problem is HTML string is considered unsafe, so in order to pass it to my controller, I need to add [ValidateInput(false)] attribute to my Action method, like below:

    [ValidateInput(false)] // <-- not able to hit the action method without this
    [HttpPost]
    [AllowAnonymous]
    [ValidateAntiForgeryToken]
    public async Task<JsonResult> Contact(string message)
    {
        if (!HttpContext.User.Identity.IsAuthenticated)
        {
            return Json(new { Authorize = "false" });
        }

        // email message to receiver
    }

And this is the Ajax method which contacts the controller:

$('#contactBtn').click(function () {
    var form = $('#__AjaxAntiForgeryForm');
    var token = $('input[name="__RequestVerificationToken"]', form).val();
    var message = quill.root.innerHTML; // <-- HTML formatted message

    $.ajax({
        url: "/Communication/Contact",
        data: { __RequestVerificationToken: token, message: message },
        dataType: 'json',
        type: "POST"
    });
});

So the above code works, but I am not sure if this is the right thing to do? Is there any security issue with the above code? Is there any encoding that I need to do on the HTML?

2

Actually ValidateInput attribute is related to XSS (Cross Site Security) issue.

XSS(Cross Site Security) is a security attack where the attacker injects malicious code while doing data entry. This code can be a javascript, vbscript or any other scripting code. Once the code is injected in end user’s browser. This code can run and gain access to cookies, sessions, local files and so on.

Now the good news is that XSS is by default prevented in ASP.NET MVC. So if any one tries to post JavaScript or HTML code with input he lands with the following error.

A potentially dangerous Request.Form value was detected from the client.....

But in real life there are scenarios where HTML has to be allowed, like HTML editors. So for those kind of scenarios we decorate our action method with ValidateInput attribute as follows:

[ValidateInput(false)]
public async Task<JsonResult> Contact(string message)
{

}

But there is problem of doing this. We are allowing HTML and script on the complete action which can be dangerous. Suppose the form we are posting have five input text fields, now the all five text fields can contain HTML and scripts.

Instead this Microsoft article suggest:

For ASP.NET MVC 3 or greater applications, when you need to post HTML back to your model, don’t use ValidateInput(false) to turn off Request Validation. Simply add [AllowHtml] to your model property, like so:

public class BlogEntry
{
  public int UserId {get;set;}
  [AllowHtml]
  public string BlogText {get;set;}
}

So bottom line is that ValidateInput allows scripts and HTML to be posted on the whole action level while AllowHTML is on a more granular level.

For more details you can read ASP.NET Security - Securing Your ASP.NET Applications

0

Using [ValidateInput(false)] on the action method is not a good approach, as there could be other input parameters that don't get validated... using [AllowHtml] works if we are passing in a Model...

For this scenario, we could do what is explained in this this tutorial:

My solution is based on the tutorial above, except I have added sanitization logic to model binder, which means we allow the HTML input, but use HTMLSanitizer to sanitize the input.

Defined a custom model binder:

public class AllowHtmlBinder: IModelBinder
{
    // use HtmlSanitizer to remove unsafe HTML/JS from input
    private HtmlSanitizer _htmlSanitizer = new HtmlSanitizer();

    public object BindModel(ControllerContext controllerContext, ModelBindingContext bindingContext)
    {
        var request = controllerContext.HttpContext.Request;
        var name = bindingContext.ModelName;
        var unvalidatedInputMessage = request.Unvalidated[name]; // get the unvalidated input
        var sanitizedMessage = _htmlSanitizer.Sanitize(unvalidatedInputMessage); // removed script or any XSS thread from user input
        return sanitizedMessage;
    }
}

And used it on the specific parameter:

[HttpPost]
[AllowAnonymous]
[ValidateAntiForgeryToken]
public async Task<JsonResult> Contact([ModelBinder(typeof(AllowHtmlBinder))] string message)
{
    if (!HttpContext.User.Identity.IsAuthenticated)
    {
        return Json(new { Authorize = "false" });
    }

    // email message to receiver
}
  • What was wrong in my answer? – TanvirArjel Jan 24 at 12:59
  • @TanvirArjel, thanks for your answer, it put me on the right track... though your answer is not applicable to input parameter. – Hooman Bahreini Jan 24 at 13:06
  • [AllowHtml] does not pass the HTML to the action method with model? I have checked the link you provided with your answer? This is totally a different case from your question. That issue deserve another question. I have answered exactly what you asked in this question, isn't it? – TanvirArjel Jan 24 at 13:12
  • Okay! Thank you. – TanvirArjel Jan 24 at 13:16

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