7

I already looked for similar questions, but they are related to JQuery or any other library.

First, I wrote this:

const printIn1Sec = (value) => {
  return new Promise(resolve => {
    setTimeout(() => {
      console.log(value);
      resolve();
    }, 1000)
  });
};

And used it in this way:

printIn1Sec(1)
.then(() => printIn1Sec(2))
.then(() => printIn1Sec(3));

I think then is very important, because it allows us to execute something as soon as the promise is resolved.

But I was looking for something like this:

printIn1Sec(1)
.printIn1Sec(2)
.printIn1Sec(3);

I noticed I needed an object with access to this printIn1Sec method. So I defined a class:

class Printer extends Promise {
  in1Sec(v) {
    return this.then(() => this.getPromise(v));
  }

  getPromise(value) {
    return new Printer(resolve => {
      setTimeout(() => {
        console.log(value);
        resolve();
      }, 1000)
    })
  }
}

And used it this way:

Printer.resolve().in1Sec(1).in1Sec(2).in1Sec(3);

I had to resolve the Promise from the beginning, in order to the start the chain. But it still bothers me.

Do you think, is there a way to get it working like the following?

printIn1Sec(1).printIn1Sec(2).printIn1Sec(3);

I was thinking in a new class or method, that could receive these values, store them, and finally start resolving the chain. But it would require to call an aditional method at the end, to init with the flow.

  • 4
    Have you tried async/await? It is not going to be just like what you want but I recommend you checking it if you hadn't. – holydragon Jan 24 '19 at 4:55
  • 1
    While async/await is the obvious answer, I'm curious to see whether any trick exists that will (even clumsily) allow chaining in such a way. I doubt it but let's see. I'd recommend the OP don't accept an answer immediately. – nicholaswmin Jan 24 '19 at 5:17
7

If you really wanted to create a chainable interface as in your question, this would do it:

const printIn1Sec = (function() {

  function setTimeoutPromise(timeout) {
    return new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(resolve, 1000));
  }

  function printIn1Sec(value, promise) {
    const newPromise = promise
      .then(() => setTimeoutPromise(1000))
      .then(() => console.log(value));

    return {
      printIn1Sec(value) {
        return printIn1Sec(value, newPromise);
      },
    };
  }

  return value => printIn1Sec(value, Promise.resolve());
}());

printIn1Sec(1)
  .printIn1Sec(2)
  .printIn1Sec(3);

We just hide all the promise creation and chaining in an internal function. I split the code into smaller functions to make it a bit nicer looking.

  • Thanks! I was thinking in a way to create an object with a method without defining a class, but I didn't know it was possible or not. You did this inside function printIn1Sec(value, promise) for the return, right? As I understand, the first call refers to the const variable, but the following are objects calling printIn1Sec(value), which is finally using printIn1Sec(value, promise). Is that correct? – JCarlosR Jan 24 '19 at 14:38
  • 1
    Yep, that's correct. Objects can just be created with object literals. – Felix Kling Jan 24 '19 at 18:25
6

You can try async and await

const printIn1Sec = (value) => {
  return new Promise(resolve => {
    setTimeout(() => {
      console.log(value);
        resolve();
    }, 1000)
  });
};

async function fun(){
  await printIn1Sec(1);
  await printIn1Sec(2);
  await printIn1Sec(3);
}

fun();

  • How does this get 3 upvotes and I get -2? Not only does my answer cover async/await and gives him the general solution for what he wants, your answer is literally "use syntactic sugar to do exactly what you explicitly said you started out with and don't want to do" .... sometimes I really don't get this site at all.... – Leroy Stav Jan 24 '19 at 5:35
  • 1
    @LeroyStav I didn't downvote your answer. But I think people here prefer to see code examples, more than useful links. – JCarlosR Jan 24 '19 at 14:53
  • I did not mean to imply you did, sorry! – Leroy Stav Jan 24 '19 at 15:58

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.