2

I have a pattern that I want to match and replace with an X. However, I only want the pattern to be replaced if the preceding character is either an A, B or not preceeded by any character (beginning of string).

I know how to replace patterns using the str_replace_all function but I don't know how I can add this additional condition. I use the following code:

library(stringr)

string <- "0000A0000B0000C0000D0000E0000A0000"
pattern <- c("XXXX")



replacement <- str_replace_all(string, pattern, paste0("XXXX"))

Result:

[1] "XXXXAXXXXBXXXXCXXXXDXXXXEXXXXAXXXX"

Desired result:

Replacement only when preceding charterer is A, B or no character:

[1] "XXXXAXXXXBXXXXC0000D0000E0000AXXXX"
2

You may use

gsub("(^|[AB])0000", "\\1XXXX", string)

See the regex demo

Details

  • (^|[AB]) - Capturing group 1 (\1): start of string (^) or (|) A or B ([AB])
  • 0000 - four zeros.

R demo:

string <- "0000A0000B0000C0000D0000E0000A0000"
pattern <- c("XXXX")
gsub("(^|[AB])0000", "\\1XXXX", string)
## -> [1] "XXXXAXXXXBXXXXC0000D0000E0000AXXXX"
  • Thank you for nice regex ++ve, hey how about I use [\\^AB], will it take it as negating AB? Or it will take ^ as start here? Could you please guide here. – RavinderSingh13 Jan 24 at 12:04
  • 1
    @RavinderSingh13 In a TRE regex, [\\^AB] matches any of the 4 chars: \, ^, A or B. – Wiktor Stribiżew Jan 24 at 12:07
0

Could you please try following. Using positive lookahead method here.

string <- "0000A0000B0000C0000D0000E0000A0000"
gsub(x = string, pattern = "(^|A|B)(?=0000)((?i)0000?)",
    replacement = "\\1xxxx", perl=TRUE)

Output will be as follows.

[1] "xxxxAxxxxBxxxxC0000D0000E0000Axxxx"
  • Why (?i)0000?? 0 is a caseless char. (?=0000)((?i)0000?) = 0000. This answer is a copy of mine, but with a very obfuscated (and less efficient) pattern. Similar to writing (?![A-XZ])[A-Z] to match just Y. – Wiktor Stribiżew Jan 25 at 8:02
  • @WiktorStribiżew, to be very honest I didn't have intention to copy your answer, I thought another way of positive lookahead which I am learning as of now, please be with me. Trying to learn regex. – RavinderSingh13 Jan 25 at 10:16
  • I did not mean you copied my pattern, I mean it is the same solution if you remove all ambiguities and redundancy from the pattern. It shows how one should not write regular expressions: they must be clear and straight-forward and should not conceal the original regex author thought, or intention. – Wiktor Stribiżew Jan 25 at 10:23
0

Thanks to Wiktor Stribiżew for the answer! It also works with the stringr package:

library(stringr)

string <- "0000A0000B0000C0000D0000E0000A0000"
pattern <- c("0000")

replace <- str_replace_all(string, paste0("(^|[AB])",pattern), "\\1XXXX")
replace

[1] "XXXXAXXXXBXXXXC0000D0000E0000AXXXX"

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