36

Say you have this html:

<a href="#">
    This is underlined
    <span>
        This isn't.
    </span>
</a>

And this css:

a:hover {
    text-decoration: underline; /* I know, this is enabled by default. */
}

a:hover span {
    text-decoration: none !important;
}

Why does the a > span element still has an underline. I'm pretty sure you should actually have undone the decoration by using 'none'. I know that you can achieve the result I want by using this:

<a href="#">
    <span class="underlined">
        This is underlined
    </span>
    <span>
        This isn't.
    </span>
</a>

plus this css:

a:hover {
    text-decoration: none;
}

a:hover span.underlined {
    text-decoration: underline;
}

But... it just doesn't make sense to me why you can't unset the text-decoration of a child-element. So, why...?

Edit: Inline-blocks

According to @amosrivera, it does work when you use inline-block. I can confirm this to work in Safari and Chrome!

a:hover span{
    text-decoration:none;
    display:inline-block;
}

As mentioned, this works for Safari and Chrome, but not for Firefox. The following solution works for Firefox, but not for Safari and Chrome...

a:hover span{
    text-decoration:none;
    display:block;
}

Little table:

    CSS-Rule            |    Webkit    |    Firefox    |    Opera    |    IE    
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
display: block;         |       x      |               |      ?      |     ?    
display: inline-block;  |              |       x       |      ?      |     ?
1
  • 1
    IE7, works without anything, IE8 and Opera both work with inline-block. FF3.6/4 is wrong, it explicitly says in the text-decoration definition "User agents must not render these text decorations on content that is not text. For example, images and inline blocks must not be underlined."
    – clairesuzy
    Mar 25, 2011 at 16:50

5 Answers 5

34

It has to do with the fact that span is an inline element. Try this:

a span{
    text-decoration:none;
    display:inline-block;
}

Online demo: http://jsfiddle.net/yffXp/

UPDATE

In FF (4?) only display:block works (which at the same time in webkit doesn't), causes line break.

UPDATE 2 (hack?)

a span{
    display:inline-block;
    background:#fff;
    line-height:1.1em;
}

Overlaying the white background over the border is not pretty but it seems to do it. It works in every browser other than IE 6,7

Online demo: http://jsfiddle.net/yffXp/6/

13
  • 1
    @steve you're right, it doesnt work on ff4, just with display:block
    – amosrivera
    Mar 25, 2011 at 16:04
  • 1
    I should point out that inline elements cannot be parents of block elements. So having an anchor (implicitly inline) with a nested span (explicitly block) is against the spec. Apparently, though, nesting an inline-block inside an inline element is just fine.
    – Moses
    Mar 25, 2011 at 16:46
  • 1
    span is by default inline not block "These elements define content to be inline (SPAN)" w3.org/TR/html401/struct/global.html
    – amosrivera
    Mar 25, 2011 at 16:54
  • 1
    That last demo isn't really a solution. For example: jsfiddle.net/yffXp/8
    – thirtydot
    Mar 25, 2011 at 16:55
  • 1
    @Moses you're quite right about nesting block level elements inside inline ones, but changing a CSS display not change the actual element properties so nesting a inline span with display:block inside an inline a is perfectly OK it will validate however you will then get the line breaks ;)
    – clairesuzy
    Mar 25, 2011 at 16:56
15

There might be some incredibly zany cross-browser way to do it, but I'd just go with this (a variation of the solution in your question), for the sake of sanity:

It just works: http://jsfiddle.net/KrepM/1/

HTML:

<a href="#">
    <span>This is underlined</span>
    This isn't.
</a>

CSS:

a:hover {
    text-decoration: none
}

a:hover span {
    text-decoration: underline
}
1
  • Doesn't work if it reverse a:hover underline and the child is none
    – TomSawyer
    Aug 4, 2022 at 5:40
2

As a solution, I'd use @thirtydot's one, but as far as the problem is concerned, I think you are looking at it the wrong way.

Check the following fiddle: As you can see the non-decorated part is not decorated with the colour given; what you are seeing is the colour of it´s parent that extends to the end of the element (as spaces in an a are underlined as well). So the browser is really doing what you are telling it to do, you just don´t see it.

As a reference, compare the previous fiddle with this one. And guess what happens when you change the colour of the span to the background colour...

1
  • 1
    This is true, the underlining is propagating to the inline child element (anonymous or otherwise), like color does - but then the recs (there's a link in a comment to the OP) specifically state the handling of underlining on inline-blocks and images (it shouldn't propagate!) so I'd say that those browsers not handling the inline-block solution here are being naughty ;)
    – clairesuzy
    Mar 25, 2011 at 17:19
1

Caught that problem when I used a class for my link.

<a href="#close" class="close">&times;</a>

If I used .close in my css chrome and safari kept underlining the link. When I added a tag before class name everything started working fine.

a {
    text-decoration: none;
}
a.close {
    color: black;
}
0

I came across this problem today, but for pseudo elements, which amounts to the same situation and I was able to find a solution. Set overflow:hidden; on the child element. Then set your height of the child element slightly smaller than the height for the rest of the link. You'll have to play with the height a few times to get it just right, but eventually you should be able to make the underline disappear.

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