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I am currently using a description list to allow for a header and sub-terms below. I've split this into three columns using the CSS columns property.

At present, this results in the list being broken midway through the list of dd elements below a dt element. Is there a CSS solution to stop breaks between dd's so that each column always starts with a dt?

I'm not attached to using dt, a solution using a ul or some other element would be fine.

<div id="pqr_list">
    <dl id="pqr_dl">
        <dt>TERM-A</dt>
        <dd>Item 1</dd>
        <dd>Item 2</dd>
        <dd>Item 3</dd>
        <dt>TERM-B</dt>
        <dd>Item 1</dd>
        <dd>Item 2</dd>
        <dt>TERM-C</dt>
        <dd>Item 1</dd>
        <dd>Item 2</dd>
        <dd>Item 3</dd>
        <dd>Item 4</dd>
        <dd>Item 5</dd>
        <dd>Item 6</dd>
        <dd>Item 7</dd>
        <dt>TERM-D</dt>
        <dd>Item 1</dd>
        <dd>Item 2</dd>
        <dd>Item 3</dd>
        <dd>Item 4</dd>        
    </dl>
</div>

I should add, I have tried

dd {
  break-before: avoid;
}
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    Definition lists often are a p.i.t.a. to deal with, because they don’t allow to group the terms and items together - so I would probably switch this for a structure where you can implement such grouping, and then try and use break-inside: avoid-column on the grouping element. – 04FS Jan 24 '19 at 14:54
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    @04FS Thanks, I've ended up doing this, much better approach really. If you make this an answer I'll accept it. – chip Jan 24 '19 at 19:31
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Definition lists often are difficult to deal with, because they don’t allow to group a term and its items together. (I think with HTML5 it was temporarily discussed to introduce an additional element for this purpose, but that idea was eventually discarded again.)

So if the use of a definition list is not a necessity, I would recommend that you chose a different structure in which the dt and dd can be grouped together, and then try and use break-inside: avoid-column on the grouping element.

| improve this answer | |
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    You are allowed to use divs to group dt~dd. After that can get a decent style going. developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/HTML/Element/dl see Permitted content – René Jan 25 '19 at 8:28
  • Hey @René, thanks for the info, seems I haven’t kept up with the latest developments in this regard :-) w3.org/TR/html50/grouping-content.html#the-dl-element did not yet include this, but the Living Standard version has been updated like you said. This is really good to know, because for a lot of use cases DL did not really recommend themselves in the past, because lack of grouping hampered styling attempts. – 04FS Jan 25 '19 at 8:38
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An example of the new allowed method of using divs to wrap inside dl's. Using grid here but there are alternatives. And in any case, a lot of frameworks use custom elements and I don't think you'll be punished when using a div in the "wrong" place.

Read more about it at MDN section permitted content.

dl>div {
  display: grid;
  border-top: 1px solid #ddd;
  padding-top: .25em;
  padding-bottom: .25em;
  grid-gap: 1em;
  grid-template-columns: minmax(100px, 20%) auto;
}

dl>div:last-child {
  border-bottom: 1px solid #ddd;
}

dt {}

dd {
  margin: 0;
  grid-column: 2;
}
<dl>
  <div>
    <dt>Parent company</dt>
    <dd>Air France-KLM Group</dd>
  </div>
  <div>
    <dt>Alliance</dt>
    <dd>Sky Team</dd>
  </div>
  <div>
    <dt>Hubs</dt>
    <dd>
      Amsterdam Airport Schiphol
    </dd>
  </div>
  <div>
    <dt>Similar</dt>
    <dd>Demo 1</dd>
    <dd>Demo 2</dd>
    <dd>Demo 3</dd>
  </div>
</dl>

Just realised using grid you wouldn't even need the divs all the time. Depends on how much control you have over the html. But it's still useful when you can't yet use grid in your project.

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