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I'm about to design a RESTful API for backing up and restoring a database.

And I wonder if there is an approach that is RESTful as well as reasonable...

The API should support 3 operations:

  1. Make a backup.
  2. List available backups (mainly for the purpose of selecting one for restore).
  3. Restore from a particular backup.

The first two look pretty straightforward:

paths:
  /foo/backups:
    post:
      # create a backup
  /foo/backups:
    get:
      # list available backups

But what about restoring from a backup?

I see some options - none of them really satisfying me so far:

  1. Forget REST and go for RPC over HTTP., Just something like

    paths:
      /foo/backups/{backupId}:
        post:
          requestBody:
            content:
              application/json:
                schema:
                  object:
                    properties:
                      action: { type: string }
                examples:
                  theBody:
                    value:
                      action: restore
    
  2. GET request for a particular backup (/foo/backups/{backupId}):

    paths:
      /foo/backups/{backupId}:
        get:
          # restore the database from this backup
    

    From REST perspective this might be fine for the following reasons:

    • The resource (/foo/backups/{backupId}) won't be amended.
    • The operation is idempotent

    But there is a very strong side-effect (restoring the database) that I find completely counterintuitive for a GET request.

  3. POST (or PUT or PATCH) request for a particular backup (/foo/backups/{backupId}):

    In the simplest case we wouldn't post anything. In other cases we might post a restore-comment or similar.

    paths:
      /foo/backups/{backupId}:
        post:
          # restore the database from this backup
    

    In neither case it looks right to post nothing or a comment to a backup for triggering a restore.

  4. Introduce a restores resource to operate on: In this case /foo/restores/{backupId} would represent a collection of executed DB restores (e.g. with timestamp and comment)

    paths:
      /foo/restores/{backupId}:
        post:
          description: Adds a restore record to this restore collection
          requestBody:
            content:
              application/json:
                schema:
                  object:
                    properties:
                      comment: { type: string }
                examples:
                  theBody:
                    value:
                      comment: Restored because of DB corruption after power failure.
    

    Looks more reasonable and RESTful but it doesn't really convice me.

  5. Provide a PATCH operation on /foo/backups/{backupId} that creates a new resource - e.g. /foo/backups/{backupId}/restores/{restoreId}

    paths:
      /foo/backups/{backupId}:
        patch:
          description: Adds a restore record to the restores collection of this backup
          requestBody:
            content:
              application/json:
                schema:
                  object:
                    properties:
                      action: { type: string }
                      comment: { type: string }
                examples:
                  theBody:
                    value:
                      action: restore
                      comment: Restored because of DB corruption after power failure.
    

    To me this looks like a quite reasonable approach so far but it looks quite RPC-like rather than RESTful.

Are there

  • ideas for better approaches
  • arguments why one of those I suggested is better than the others
  • any missing aspects that should be considered?

closed as primarily opinion-based by Tieson T., cassiomolin, Michael Dodd, ekad, AdrianHHH Jan 25 at 14:16

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Don't worry aobut deleting, it's not important. I restored your question because it's still useful as a record. – Evert Jan 29 at 3:42
1

I think a lot of your options are viable - remember, there isn't a one size fits all solution.

Personally, I believe option 4, with a little change, would be ideal. Might be a little biased, but that's how I've used it in the past.

The endpoint can look like this:

POST /foo/restores

The request body will include the backup_id.

Therefore:

GET /foo/restores - returns all restore records.

GET /fee/restores/{restore_id} - returns specific restore record.

I think it's ideal because restoration (i.e. recovery) and backup are two distinct actions with their own properties, and it's a good idea not to embed them within each other. Having two different resources achieves that.

  • Thanks for your response. I agree that backup and restore are distinct operations with their own properties. But they're not independent. Restores definitely depend on backups - no restore without backup. That's why option 4 didn't convince me. – yaccob Jan 26 at 22:15

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