0

Background

I am trying to get the exit code of a command launched via x-terminal-emulator -e. Using this command, it simply opens a new terminal window and passes it sh -c with the command that you want to be executed within the new terminal window. I then use a combination of ps ax, grep, xargs & cut to get the PID of the running process.

👨🏼‍💻tester.sh

#!/bin/bash

execute() {

    local -r CMDS="$1"
    local exitCode=0
    local cmdsPID=""

    # - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    # Execute a command within a 
    # a new 'x-terminal-emulator' window.

    x-terminal-emulator -e "$CMDS" &> /dev/null

    # Get the PID of the process spawned by
    # 'x-terminal-emulator'.

    cmdsPID="$(ps ax | grep "sh -c $CMDS" | xargs | cut -d ' ' -f 1)"

    # - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    # Wait for the commands to no longer be executing
    # in the background, and then get their exit code.

    wait "$cmdsPID" &> /dev/null
    exitCode=$?

    # - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    # Print output based on what happened.

    echo "$exitCode"    

}

execute "apt update && apt upgrade -y && apt full-upgrade -y && apt autoremove -y && apt clean"

⚠️ Error

However, when I utilize the command wait to wait for the PID to finish running so that I can get the exit code of the command, wait returns:

pid #### is not a child of this shell

Is there a way where I can both wait for the PID to finish, then grab its exit code from a process not spawned under the parent shell?

1

Is there a reason to launch your command in another xterm? your script seems to be sequential, so perhaps this solution could be acceptable?

#!/bin/bash

execute() {

    local -r CMDS="$1"
    local exitCode=0
    local cmdsPID=""

    output=`$CMDS > /dev/null`
    exitCode=$?
    echo $exitCode    
}
execute "apt update && apt upgrade -y && apt full-upgrade -y && apt autoremove -y && apt clean"

  • I appreciate your solution and time considering my query. However, this is part of a much larger project I am currently working on, but I have simplified it here. So, part of my use case is to have a new terminal window open and execute the command in question. – Nicholas Adamou Jan 25 at 18:50
1

Why would you use another terminal and not create a child process? It's much more cleaner IMHO. This way you're able to use the wait command:

function i_exit {
        ($1) &
        wait $!
        return $?
}

i_exit "true"
echo $?
i_exit "false"
echo $?
i_exit "true && true"
echo $?
i_exit "true && false"
echo $?

You create a background process using "&". The PID created is stored in $! and when the child exits, you can return the value with $?. This is catchable out of the function with the same variable. The code above outputs:

$ ./test.sh 
0
1
0
0

No ps aux | grep whatever needed!

EDIT: Of course you can execute things in a terminal if you really wanted to. The following script does just that. I dont have xfce, but you can replace "xterm" with "x-terminal-emulator".

#! /bin/bash

function i_exit {
        (xterm -e "$1") &
        wait $!
        return $?
}

# Waits 5 seconds
i_exit "true && echo 'Test 1' && sleep 5s"
echo $?
# Exits immediately
i_exit "false && echo 'Test 2' && sleep 5s"
echo $?
  • Sorry, but xterm doesn't return the exit status from the process. It will always be 0 because whether it fails or not, the terminal executes the command correctly. Please take a look at: stackoverflow.com/questions/8416596/… – Bayou Jan 26 at 2:50
1

After a bit of trial and error and some research, I have come up with a solution.

My solution involves the following:

  1. The use of redirecting $? output from within the new terminal window that was spawned from x-terminal-emulator to a temporary file utilizing mktemp.
  2. Then, utilizing the until conditional structure to wait until that temporary file is not empty.
  3. Once the temporary file is not empty, I can then cat the contents of the file and store it within a variable. Then, echo the results.

👨🏼‍💻tester.sh (Refactored)

#!/bin/bash

execute() {

    local -r CMDS="$1"

    local -r EXIT_STATUS_FILE="$(mktemp /tmp/XXXXX)"

    local exitCode=0
    local cmdsPID=""

    # - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    # Execute a command within a 
    # a new 'x-terminal-emulator' window.

    x-terminal-emulator -e "($CMDS) ; echo \$? > $EXIT_STATUS_FILE" \
        &> /dev/null

    # Get the PID of the process spawned by
    # 'x-terminal-emulator'.

    cmdsPID="$(ps ax | grep -v "grep" | grep -v "S+" | grep "sh -c" | grep "$CMDS" | xargs | cut -d ' ' -f 1)"

    # - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    # Wait for the commands to no longer be executing
    # in the background, and then get their exit code.

    until [ -s "$EXIT_STATUS_FILE" ];
    do
        sleep 1
    done

    exitCode="$(cat "$EXIT_STATUS_FILE")"

    # - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    # Print output based on what happened.

    echo "$exitCode"

    # - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    # Remove temporary file.

    rm -rf "$EXIT_STATUS_FILE"  

}

execute \
  "apt update && apt upgrade -y && apt full-upgrade -y && apt autoremove -y && apt clean"

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.