2

On compiling the following Try it out on Coliru!, I was expecting that GCC does not consider the function

  template <typename DST, typename... Ts> 
  std::enable_if_t<sizeof...(Ts) == 0> CheckAndSetVal(DST&) {}

for analysis because the sizeof condition is not fulfilled.

namespace SFINAE
{
  template <typename DST, typename... Ts> 
  std::enable_if_t<sizeof...(Ts) == 0> CheckAndSetVal(DST&) {}

  template <typename DST, typename T1, typename T2, typename... Ts>
  std::enable_if_t<!std::is_same_v<DST, T2> > CheckAndSetVal(DST& dst, T1&& cond, T2&& val, Ts&&... ts)
  {
    if (cond())
      dst = val();
    else
      CheckAndSetVal(dst, std::forward<Ts>(ts)...);
  }

  template <typename DST, typename T1, typename T2, typename... Ts>
  std::enable_if_t<std::is_same_v<DST, T2> > CheckAndSetVal(DST& dst, T1&& cond, T2&& val, Ts&&... ts)
  {
    if (cond())
      dst = val;
    else
      CheckAndSetVal(dst, std::forward<Ts>(ts)...);
  }

  template <typename DST, typename... Ts>
  void SetValue(DST& dst, Ts&&... ts)
  {
    CheckAndSetVal(dst, std::forward<Ts>(ts)...);
  }
}

int main()
{
  int i = 0;
  SFINAE::SetValue(i, []() { return true; }     , []() { return 222; }
                    , []() { return false; }    , 444
                  );
}

But I see GCC throwing the following error which IMHO is a contradiction to itself. It complains that it cannot find a matching function for one of the recursive function call with int&, lambda and int as arguments. But again says that the candidate is the one which should have been disabled because the condition, sizeof...(Ts) == 0 is false.

candidate expects 1 argument, 3 provided

Can someone help me understand why this is so ?

main.cpp: In instantiation of 'std::enable_if_t<(! is_same_v<DST, T2>)> SFINAE::CheckAndSetVal(DST&, T1&&, T2&&, Ts&& ...) [with DST = int; T1 = main()::<lambda()>; T2 = main()::<lambda()>; Ts = {main()::<lambda()>, int}; std::enable_if_t<(! is_same_v<DST, T2>)> = void]':
main.cpp:36:19:   required from 'void SFINAE::SetValue(DST&, Ts&& ...) [with DST = int; Ts = {main()::<lambda()>, main()::<lambda()>, main()::<lambda()>, int}]'
main.cpp:47:19:   required from here
main.cpp:21:21: error: no matching function for call to 'CheckAndSetVal(int&, main()::<lambda()>, int)'
       CheckAndSetVal(dst, std::forward<Ts>(ts)...);
       ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~^~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
main.cpp:13:40: note: candidate: 'template<class DST, class ... Ts> std::enable_if_t<(sizeof... (Ts) == 0)> SFINAE::CheckAndSetVal(DST&)'
   std::enable_if_t<sizeof...(Ts) == 0> CheckAndSetVal(DST&) {}
                                        ^~~~~~~~~~~~~~
main.cpp:13:40: note:   template argument deduction/substitution failed:
main.cpp:21:21: note:   candidate expects 1 argument, 3 provided
       CheckAndSetVal(dst, std::forward<Ts>(ts)...);
       ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~^~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
main.cpp:16:47: note: candidate: 'template<class DST, class T1, class T2, class ... Ts> std::enable_if_t<(! is_same_v<DST, T2>)> SFINAE::CheckAndSetVal(DST&, T1&&, T2&&, Ts&& ...)'
   std::enable_if_t<!std::is_same_v<DST, T2> > CheckAndSetVal(DST& dst, T1&& cond, T2&& val, Ts&&... ts)
                                               ^~~~~~~~~~~~~~
main.cpp:16:47: note:   template argument deduction/substitution failed:
  • 1
    Fwiw, the title of this question is totally wrong. gcc is correctly disabling the function – Barry Jan 25 at 17:02
  • I used the above title to reflect the point that it compiles fine with VS2017 but not with GCC. But again, the point about VS is missing in the title though, which is in turn confusing. Sorry About that … – lightsunray Jan 25 at 17:21
3

First, this:

template <typename DST, typename... Ts> 
std::enable_if_t<sizeof...(Ts) == 0> CheckAndSetVal(DST&) {}

should just be:

template <typename DST> 
void CheckAndSetVal(DST&) {}

Now, once we get through that, your 2nd overload looks like:

template <typename DST, typename T1, typename T2, typename... Ts>
std::enable_if_t<!std::is_same_v<DST, T2> >
CheckAndSetVal(DST& dst, T1&& cond, T2&& val, Ts&&... ts)
{
  if (cond())
    dst = val();
  else
    CheckAndSetVal(dst, std::forward<Ts>(ts)...); // (*)
}

There are cases where the marked line wants to call the 3rd overload (such as in your sample program). But the 3rd overload isn't actually in scope yet, and it cannot be found by ADL. The only candidates for the marked line are this overload itself (which isn't a candidate because it's SFINAE-d out) and the first overload (which isn't a candidate because it doesn't take enough arguments).

So you have to either:

  • Declare (but don't define) the 3rd overload before the 2nd so that it is in scope for the 2nd.
  • Add a dummy 1st parameter that is some empty class in namespace SFINAE so that ADL lets you find later-declared functions
  • Make all of these member operator()s of a class, so that you can see later-declared functions because class bodies are complete-class contexts. And then make CheckAndSetVal a function object of that class type, rather than being multiple overloaded functions.
  • Thank you for your quick answer. Firstly, About the function definition being without the "enable_if": My original Version actually was like that. I was simply trying to force GCC to not see it by using the enable_if. Secondly, It was sort of clear to me that it is not able to see the second Version of the function but I was assuming since in that Iteration, only one function is supposed to be "active" (which IMHO is the whole Point of SFINAE), it is irrelevant how and where the functions are placed. Something VS seems to follow. So who do you think is behaving Correctly ? – lightsunray Jan 25 at 17:37
  • @lightsunray The correct behavior is to reject the program. It's ill-formed. – Barry Jan 25 at 18:16

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.