6

I'm still very confused about how asyncio works, so I was trying to set a simple example but couldn't achieve it.

The following example is a web server (Quart) that receives a request to generate a large PDF, the server then returns a response before start processing the PDF, then starts processing it and will send the download link to an email later.

from quart import Quart
import asyncio
import time

app = Quart(__name__)

@app.route('/')
async def pdf():
    t1 = time.time()
    await generatePdf()
    return 'Time to execute : {} seconds'.format(time.time() - t1)

async def generatePdf():
    await asyncio.sleep(5)
    #sync generatepdf
    #send pdf link to email

app.run()

How would I go about this? in the above example I don't want the 5 seconds to be waited before the return.

I'm not even sure if asyncio is what I need.

And I'm afraid that blocking the server app after the response has returned is not a thing that should be done, but not sure either.

Also the pdf library is synchronous, but I guess that's a problem for another day...

  • 2
    Try changing await generatePdf() to asyncio.create_task(generatePdf()). – user4815162342 Jan 25 at 20:18
6
+100

The comment has everything you need to respond to the web request and schedule the pdf generation for later.

asyncio.create_task(generatePdf())

However it is not a good idea if the pdf processing is slow as it will block the asyncio event thread. i.e. The current request will be responded quickly but the following request will have to wait till the pdf generation is complete.

The correct way would be run the task in an executor (especially ProcessPoolExecutor).

from quart import Quart
import asyncio
import time
from concurrent.futures import ProcessPoolExecutor

app = Quart(__name__)
executor = ProcessPoolExecutor(max_workers=5)

@app.route('/')
async def pdf():
    t1 = time.time()
    asyncio.get_running_loop().run_in_executor(executor, generatePdf)
    # await generatePdf()
    return 'Time to execute : {} seconds'.format(time.time() - t1)

def generatePdf():
    #sync generatepdf
    #send pdf link to email

app.run()

It is important to note that since, it is running in different process, the generatePdf cannot access any data without synchronization. So pass everything the function needs when calling the function.


Update

If you can refactor the generatePdf function and make it async, it works best.

Example if the generate pdf looks like

def generatePdf():
    image1 = downloadImage(image1Url)
    image2 = downloadImage(image2Url)
    data = queryData()
    pdfFile = makePdf(image1, image2, data)
    link = upLoadToS3(pdfFile)
    sendEmail(link)

You can make the function async like:

async def generatePdf():
    image1, image2, data = await asyncio.gather(downloadImage(image1Url), downloadImage(image2Url), queryData())
    pdfFile = makePdf(image1, image2, data)
    link = await upLoadToS3(pdfFile)
    await sendEmail(link) 

Note: All the helper functions like downloadImage, queryData need to be rewritten to support async. This way, requests won't be blocked even if the database or image servers are slow. Everything runs in the same asyncio thread.

If some of them are not yet async, those can be used with run_in_executor and should work good with other async functions.

  • So in the end of the day, a thread is the best solution? Does that mean that asyncio isn't even necessary? That's the only reason I switched from flask to quart – Mojimi Jan 28 at 16:04
  • @Mojimi asyncio cannot not speed up synchronous blocking tasks. If for example, pdf generation needs to do multiple database queries, and final generation is not too slow, you can use ayncio. – balki Jan 28 at 16:49
  • Agreed! asyncio is only useful for I/O bound tasks or other non CPU bound tasks. Using asyncio for CPU bound tasks will not achieve any concurrency. As @balki points out, when you use asyncio for your I/O bound tasks, you must ensure that your CPU bound tasks are returning as quickly as possible. In this case, I agree that the CPU heavy task of generating a pdf should be delegated to a separate thread or process – Arran Duff Feb 3 at 18:14
  • @balki I had an issue while implementing this, run_in_executor needs to be awaitng, and by adding an await to it it became blocking again, am I missing something? Just calling run_in_executor did nothing – Mojimi Feb 15 at 18:37
  • @Mojimi Use asyncio.create_task(...run_in_executor..) ref: docs.python.org/3/library/asyncio-task.html#asyncio.create_task – balki Feb 15 at 19:53
1
  1. I highly recommend on reviewing this explanatory article by Brad Solomon on parallel programming and asyncio in python.
  2. For the purpose of asynchronously performing a task, without the need to block the request until the task is complete - I think the best option is to use a queue that with a "PDFGenerator" class that consumes from the queue pattern(also covered in the article)
  • I understand now what async io is about, is about skipping waiting tasks like server requests right? So I don't think it fits processing a big PDF as that is a CPU and Memory intensive task – Mojimi Feb 1 at 18:04
  • 1
    Well, actually my PDF generation includes downloading some images, I guess I could optimize a loop to gather this images in async io fashion – Mojimi Feb 1 at 18:08
  • And for number 2, my biggest concern right now isn't block the request, I managed to do that, but block the server app. – Mojimi Feb 1 at 18:11
  • For CPU intensive tasks you're better off with multiprocessing, using coroutines or threads will not help because of the global interpreter lock(GIL). However if your concern is blocking the server you should probably profile the application to better understand throughput and computation times – 0e1val Feb 1 at 18:28
0

For your task, generating a large PDF, you can use an asynchronous task/job queue. As an example, you can use Celery. Since you don't want to wait for the task, rather return a reply like - "generating PDF, please wait a minute/second". So when a request comes to the "generate PDF" endpoint, you will create a task in Celery and Celery will process it asynchronously and after completion, you can push to client or client can use the "task lookup" using the task-id (or as you implement). Here is an example answer - How to check task status in Celery?

The difference between Celery and Asyncio is, Celery can execute a task in a totally separated environment and the communication with the server is done by a distributed message passing like RabbitMQ. Where Asyncio uses coroutines to utilize the blocking I/O time. It will use the same environment and processors where your server resides.

  • How is it different than using a ProcessPoolExecutor? – balki Feb 4 at 14:39
  • Celery can be used in a separate environment when needed and it's mature enough for control and communication, like message passing with RabbitMQ, backend task saving etc. In the ProcessPoolExecutor you have to implement these when scaling or trying to separate the worker from the server. In case of fault intolerance, your server can lose the task if but if you use a backend for task monitoring, you can find the task when the worker/server is online again and it's easy to implement with celery. – Azizul Haq Ananto Feb 6 at 11:49

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