-2

I have the class Pos:

public class Pos
{
    int x;
    int y;
    public int X
    {
        get
        {
            return x;
        }
        set
        {
            try
            {
                if (value == 3)
                {
                    x = value;                                               
                }                    
            }
            catch
            {
                throw new ArgumentException();
            }
        }
    }
    public int Y { get; set; }
    public Pos(int x, int y)
    {
        X = x;
        Y = y;
    }
}

I have an instance created, with X = 0. That is, as far as I understand, in the case of value = 3 -> x = 0 and in the constructor X = 0, then create an instance of the class. How do I prevent an instance of a class from being created when the x property setter fails? I will create a List that should not contain "wrong" objects.

closed as unclear what you're asking by Eric Lippert, Servy, LarsTech, Steve, greg-449 Jan 26 at 8:29

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1
    I suspect that you are misunderstanding something about the sequence of operations that occurs when you create an instance of a reference type via new. First the instance is allocated and its fields are initialized to their default values; zero in this case. Second, the constructor is executed. Third, if the constructor throws then the new operation throws and, unless you've saved the reference away somewhere, it becomes garbage. If the constructor does not throw then the reference is produced by the new expression. – Eric Lippert Jan 25 at 19:02
  • 1
    I cannot figure out what this code is supposed to do, or what the question is asking. Can you clarify it? Why would you have a setter that only allows one value to be set? If the property is not intended to be changed to any value other than 3, then why is there a setter at all? What do you mean "prevent an instance of the class being created when the setter fails?" If there is a setter running then it has to be running on an already-created instance. – Eric Lippert Jan 25 at 19:04
  • I also do not understand what the try-catch is intended to do. The code inside the try cannot throw, and therefore the catch is useless. Did you intend that to be an if-else rather than a try-catch? I really am having a lot of difficulty understanding what you are trying to do here. – Eric Lippert Jan 25 at 19:05
  • 1
    Thanks for your reply. It's good for me. If you're interested, my goal was to block the instantiation of the class if the value != 3. I realized that my path was wrong. – lupanton Jan 25 at 19:34
  • 1
    If the property only has one possible value then do not provide the developer the ability to set it at all! – Eric Lippert Jan 25 at 19:37
3

I am having a lot of difficulty understanding what this code is supposed to do and how the question relates to it, but I think maybe you are asking "how do I validate the correctness of the arguments to property setters?"

Follow this pattern:

// Class names should be words, not abbrvtns like "Pos"
public class Position
{
  private int x;
  private bool IsValidX(int possibleX)
  {
    // Here return true if possibleX is valid, false otherwise
  }
  public int X 
  { 
    get { return this.x; } 
    set 
    {
      if (!IsValidX(value))
        throw new ArgumentException("explanation here", "value");
      this.x = value;
    }
  }
  // Now do the same thing for Y.
  public Position(int x, int y)
  {
    if (!IsValidX(x)) 
      throw new ArgumentException("explanation here", "x");
    if (!IsValidY(y))
      throw new ArgumentException("explanation here", "y");
    this.x = x;
    this.y = y;
  }
}

Notice that we want to throw different argument exceptions because the argument names are different in each case.

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