1

TL;DR. I have a circular dependency and no idea how to break it.

Main.csproj: has Program.cs which manually instantiates DiService

var diService = new DiService(new Container());
diService.Register();

The register method searches CurrentDomain for assemblies and registers collections where multiple implementations exist for a given interface or else registers concretions on a 1-1 basis.

It then uses the Container to instantiate an abstract factory.

var diFactory = diService.Registry.GetInstance<IDiFactory>();

Here's the factory

public class DiFactory : IDiFactory
{
    private readonly Container registry;

    public DiFactory(Container registry)
    {
        this.registry = registry;
    }

    public T Get<T>()
    {
        var reqT = typeof(T);
        return (T) registry.GetInstance(reqT);
    }
}

The project dependencies in the solution look like this:

Main -> A -> B,E 
        B -> C,D,E
        C -> D,E
        D -> E

DiService and DiFactory live in project B with the other services. Not that it matters. I think I'd have the same problem if they were in Main.

All objects in projects B to E have a constructor injected DiFactory so they can decide what objects they need at run time. But for C to make use of it, it must depend on B, which is a circular dependency.

If I move the DI stuff to a new project F, then all projects can depend on that but how does the factory reference the types in the other projects without creating another circular dependency?

I followed the documentation for IRequestHandler, I just didn't do the dictionary. Most likely I have a design flaw but I can't see what it is.

Here's an example of the interactions between objects for LinqPad - doesn't compile but it looks right.

void Main()
{
    var diService = new Mine.Services.MyDiService();
    var diFactory = diService.Container.GetInstance<Mine.Services.IMyFactory>();
    var rand = new Random();
    var next = rand.Next(1, 100);
    var task = next % 2 == 0
        ? diFactory.Get<Mine.Tasks.EvenTask>()
        : (Mine.Tasks.IMyTask)diFactory.Get<Mine.Tasks.OddTask>();
    task.Perform();
}


namespace Mine.Common
{
    public class MyCommonObject { }
}

namespace Mine.Services
{
    public class FakeContainer
    {
        public T GetInstance<T>() { return default(T); }
    }
    public interface IMyOtherService { void DoSomethingElse(); }
    public class MyOtherService : IMyOtherService
    {
        public void DoSomethingElse()
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }
    }
    public class MyService
    {
        private readonly IMyFactory myFactory;
        public MyService(IMyFactory myFactory)
        {
            this.myFactory = myFactory;
        }
        public void MyServiceMethod()
        {
            var thing = myFactory.Get<Mine.Common.MyCommonObject>();
        }
    }

    public interface IMyFactory { T Get<T>(); }

    public class MyDiService
    {
        public FakeContainer Container;
    }
    public class MyFactory : IMyFactory
    {
        private FakeContainer Container;
        public MyFactory(FakeContainer container)
        {
            // obviously this is really a SImple Injector Container
            Container = container;
        }
        public T Get<T>()
        {
            return default(T);
        }
    }
}

namespace Mine.Kernel {
    public interface IMyMultiConcrete { void Do(); }
    public class MyConcreteBase : IMyMultiConcrete
    {
        protected readonly Mine.Services.IMyFactory MyFactory;
        public MyConcreteBase(Mine.Services.IMyFactory myFactory)
        {
            MyFactory = myFactory; 
        }
        public void Do()
        {
            MyFactory.Get<Mine.Common.MyCommonObject>();
        }
    }
    public class MyConcrete1 : MyConcreteBase
    {
        public MyConcrete1(Mine.Services.IMyFactory myFactory) : base(myFactory) {}
        public void Do()
        {
            MyFactory.Get<Mine.Common.MyCommonObject>();
        }
    }
}

namespace Mine.Tasks
{
    public interface IMyTask { void Perform(); }
    public class TaskBase : IMyTask
    {
        protected readonly Mine.Services.IMyOtherService MyOtherService;
        public TaskBase(Mine.Services.IMyFactory myFactory, Mine.Services.IMyOtherService myOtherService)
        {
            MyOtherService = myOtherService;
        }
        public void Perform()
        {
            MyOtherService.DoSomethingElse();
        }
    }

    public class OddTask : TaskBase
    {
        public OddTask(Mine.Services.IMyFactory myFactory, Mine.Services.IMyOtherService myOtherService)
        : base(myFactory, myOtherService) { }


    }


    public class EvenTask : TaskBase
    {
        public EvenTask(Mine.Services.IMyFactory myFactory, Mine.Services.IMyOtherService myOtherService)
        : base(myFactory, myOtherService) { }


    }
}
  • 1
    "a constructor injected DiFactory" : see if you can replace that with an interface in a separate project. – Henk Holterman Jan 25 at 20:54
1

This IDiFactory abstraction you are describing is not an implementation of the Abstract Factory design pattern—it is an implementation of the Service Locator pattern. Service Locator, however, is an anti-pattern and you should stop using it because its numerous downsides.

Instead, classes should not be able to request an unbound set of dependencies from a Service Locator, but neither should they typically be able to request a fixed set of dependencies using an Abstract Factory. Instead, classes should statically declare their required dependencies through the constructor.

This change might already fix the circular dependency as you will remove the IDiFactory (that is causing the cycle) in the first place.

DiService and DiFactory live in project B with the other services. Not that it matters.

It does matter where you wire up your dependencies. Dependencies should be wired up in your Composition Root and this Composition Root should live

As close as possible to the application’s entry point.

This most likely means that you should move this to your Console application. When you move that code, only the start-up assembly will take a dependency on the used DI Container. At that point, it becomes irrelevant to hide the DI Container behind an Abstraction (as your DiService seems to imply). Hiding is not needed anymore, because no other parts of the application except the Composition Root will have any knowledge about how dependency graphs are built. Hiding the DI Container behind an abstraction, at that point, doesn't increase maintainability any longer.

  • What if my factory has multiple implementations with type restriction on the Get<T> method for the particular groups of objects I expect to need dynamically? Is that still service locator? (Which I am aware of, btw, this whole thing has arisen thru my trying to avoid doing exactly that!) – twelveFunKeys Jan 26 at 22:35
  • To me that would still be an implementation of the Service Locator anti-pattern. You might even trim it down to a real Abstract Factory, but that would still be a code smell. – Steven Jan 26 at 22:36
  • Okay. So stripped out dependencies on non-service classes and instantiated them locally passing injected service references. I no longer have a circular dependency and I think that means I've eliminated the locator pattern. Thanks! – twelveFunKeys Jan 30 at 3:37
0

There might be an easier way, but what I typically end up doing is to have a separate assembly containing interfaces for everything I need to inject. The main assembly (or B could do it in your case) performs the binding of interfaces to concrete implementations and everyone can reference the interfaces assembly without creating any circular dependencies.

The interface for the factory should also be in that assembly.

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