150

In trying to obey the python style rules, I've set my editors to a max of 79 cols.

In the PEP, it recommends using python's implied continuation within brackets, parentheses and braces. However, when dealing with strings when I hit the col limit, it gets a little weird.

For instance, trying to use a multiline

mystr = """Why, hello there
wonderful stackoverflow people!"""

Will return

"Why, hello there\nwonderful stackoverflow people!"

This works:

mystr = "Why, hello there \
wonderful stackoverflow people!"

Since it returns this:

"Why, hello there wonderful stackoverflow people!"

But, when the statement is indented a few blocks in, this looks weird:

do stuff:
    and more stuff:
        and even some more stuff:
            mystr = "Why, hello there \
wonderful stackoverflow people!"

If you try and indent the second line:

do stuff:
    and more stuff:
        and even some more stuff:
            mystr = "Why, hello there \
            wonderful stackoverflow people!"

Your string ends up as:

"Why, hello there                wonderful stackoverflow people!"

The only way I've found to get around this is:

do stuff:
    and more stuff:
        and even some more stuff:
            mystr = "Why, hello there" \
            "wonderful stackoverflow people!"

Which I like better, but is also somewhat uneasy on the eyes, as it looks like there is a string just sitting in the middle of nowhere. This will produce the proper:

"Why, hello there wonderful stackoverflow people!"

So, my question is - what are some people's recommendations on how to do this and is there something I'm missing in the style guide that does show how I should be doing this?

Thanks.

  • 3
    The high indentation level may also be a sign that you need to refactor your code so it's more modular – Daenyth Mar 25 '11 at 20:18
  • 6
    I indented that much to make a point. But realize that it's quite easy to reach at least the third level of indentation - but the case still stands that even with one level of indenting, the standard method would make the string wildly out of place. – sjmh Mar 25 '11 at 20:30
231

Since adjacent string literals are automatically joint into a single string, you can just use the implied line continuation inside parentheses as recommended by PEP 8:

print("Why, hello there wonderful "
      "stackoverflow people!")
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  • 1
    Thanks Sven, I like this a bit more than the style I was using. – sjmh Mar 25 '11 at 20:34
  • 1
    I thought this was just a trick but after reading the python doc, I must say, this is neat. Thank you ! – user Feb 7 '14 at 7:41
  • The problem is when assigning to a variable, this form looks too similar to a tuple. If you add a comma between the strings, it's a tuple with two strings. – Eric Mar 23 '19 at 1:41
46

Just pointing out that it is use of parentheses that invokes auto-concatenation. That's fine if you happen to already be using them in the statement. Otherwise, I would just use '\' rather than inserting parentheses (which is what most IDEs do for you automatically). The indent should align the string continuation so it is PEP8 compliant. E.g.:

my_string = "The quick brown dog " \
            "jumped over the lazy fox"
|improve this answer|||||
5

Another possibility is to use the textwrap module. This also avoids the problem of "string just sitting in the middle of nowhere" as mentioned in the question.

import textwrap
mystr = """\
        Why, hello there
        wonderful stackoverfow people"""
print (textwrap.fill(textwrap.dedent(mystr)))
|improve this answer|||||
2

This is a pretty clean way to do it:

myStr = ("firstPartOfMyString"+
         "secondPartOfMyString"+
         "thirdPartOfMyString")
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  • Of all the solutions, this one seemed to be the only one that worked in the case of assigning a parameter to a function by name. That is, foo(text=("bar" + "baz")). So, I'm voting it up. – cycollins Nov 2 '19 at 2:29
1

I've gotten around this with

mystr = ' '.join(
        ["Why, hello there",
         "wonderful stackoverflow people!"])

in the past. It's not perfect, but it works nicely for very long strings that need to not have line breaks in them.

|improve this answer|||||
  • 16
    On my machine, this takes 350 ns, joining a tuple instead of a list takes 250 ns. Implicit joining, on the other hand, only takes 25 ns. Implicit joining is the clear winner in both simplicity and speed. – endolith Aug 22 '12 at 1:09
  • 8
    @endolith: I agree that using parentheses is better because it's cleaner, but this is not a place to consider performance. If you care about differences at runtime on the order of 100 ns, particularly when concatenating hard coded strings, something is wrong. – nmichaels Aug 27 '12 at 13:51
  • 3
    @buffer: This is about formatting hand-coded text for human interpretation. If you do this a million times, you're doing it wrong. And a million (10^6) times 100 ns (10^-9) is 100 ms (10^-3). 100 nanoseconds is so tiny that multiplying it by a million gives you something that still doesn't take long enough that you should care about it. Like I said, use the (good) accepted answer, but bringing up performance for something like this is ridiculous. – nmichaels Feb 12 '14 at 22:45
  • 2
    @buffer: Did you see the thing about this being handwritten? That's the context. – nmichaels Feb 13 '14 at 13:55
  • 2
    @osa Seriously? This is a terrible argument. 100ms is how much extra time it will take to do this a million times. We're still talking about concatenating handwritten strings for readability. Performance is not a consideration here. I've done work where 30ns matters. This is not that. – nmichaels Jan 20 '15 at 19:51

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