2

Suppose I have a simple PHP file like so:

FooBar.php

class Foo { // Helper class for FooBar
  function toString() {
    echo "Foo!<br>"
  }
}

class FooBar {
  public $foo;
  function __construct() {
    $this->foo = new Foo();
  }
}

Now, suppose I'd like to use FooBar.php in a separate file (in the same directory for this example), but I also want to allow another class to be named 'Foo'.

index.php

include("FooBar.php");

class Foo { // a new Foo object
  function toString() {
    echo "Foo #2!<br>";
  }
}

$foobar = new FooBar();

// Let's say I call 'toString()' ...
$foobar->foo->toString();
  • My expected result: "Foo!"
  • My desired result: "Foo#2!"
  • My actual result: Cannot declare class Foo, because the name is already in use in ...

Is it possible to limit the Foo class within FooBar.php, so that another class can use that name again? I suspect the solution will have to do with namespaces, although the researching I've done suggests this is only useful for files in different directories. Thanks in avance!

2

PHP namespaces do not require you to put your files in different directories, even though their syntax does somewhat resemble a filesystem path. For example, this works just fine:

FooBar.php:

<?php
namespace MyNamespace;

class Foo { // Helper class for FooBar
  function toString() {
    return "Foo!";
  }
}

class FooBar {
  public $foo;
  function __construct() {
    $this->foo = new Foo();
  }
}

index.php:

<?php
include("FooBar.php");
use MyNamespace\FooBar;

class Foo { // a new Foo object
  function toString() {
    return "Foo #2!";
  }
}

$foobar = new FooBar();
$foo = new Foo();

echo $foobar->foo->toString(), "\n";
echo $foo->toString(), "\n";

With both of the files above in the current directory, running php index.php on the command line will print:

Foo!
Foo #2!

However, you should probably be following the PHP Standards Recommendations, in particular PSR-1 and PSR-4, which among other things require each class to be in its own separate file, whose name matches the class name (plus the .php suffix), and to belong to a namespace that somehow corresponds to its filesystem path (although PSR-4 does allow some variation in how the namespace names are mapped to filesystem paths).

If you followed these recommendations, you shouldn't encounter this problem in the first place, since your two Foo classes would naturally belong to different namespaces, and thus would not conflict.

1

You can't recycle class names, but you can override class definitions by extending and overriding methods and properties that are public or protected.

By using namespaces you are basically just extending the class name, so that by changing a part of the namespace ensures that the class name remains unique.

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