3

I have a big file which contains many lines. For example:

ts=2019-01-16 network=1.1.1.1 system=irgendwas pid=100 bugReq=dasf something=else maybe=this

From each line I want to extract the following information:

ts=,system= & something=, but the values after = always change.

I have tried this, but couldn't get it to work:

$found = $string -match '.*system="(\d+)".*' if ($found) { $system= $matches[1]}
1
  • 3
    take a look at the ConvertFrom-StringData cmdlet. if you replace the space delimiter with newlines, the cmdlet will give you a hashtable that can be used to generate a PSCustomObject. the result will be a nice, clean object that can be used as any other. the only gotcha is the properties will be in no particular order.
    – Lee_Dailey
    Jan 27 '19 at 20:59
6

here's yet another solution. [grin] it uses the ConvertFrom-StringData cmdlet to parse the input into objects. then it creates a [PSCustomObject] with only the wanted props. last, it sends each object out to the $Results collection.

while the construction of the final custom object makes the following info unimportant in this case, it's important to know that the output of the ConvertFrom-StringData cmdlet is a standard hashtable. that means the order of the objects will almost certainly NOT be in the original order. DO NOT expect things to be in the order they appear in the source.

[edit = added a new data line with embedded spaces and an updated -replace pattern to handle that.]

# fake reading in a text file
#    in real life, use Get-Content
$InStuff = @(
    'ts=2019-01-16 network=1.1.1.1 system=irgendwas pid=100 bugReq=dasf something=else maybe=this'
    'ts=2019-01-16 network=1.1.1.2 system=PC-001 pid=100 bugReq=dasf something=OtherElse maybe=this'
    'ts=2019-01-16 network=1.1.1.66 system=PC-666 pid=100 bugReq=dasf something=ThisELse maybe=this'
    'ts=2019-01-16 network=1.1.1.3 system=PC-123 pid=100 bugReq=dasf something=AnotherElse maybe=this'
    'ts=2019-01-16 network=1.1.1.4 system=PC-004 Oo-LaLa another value with WhiteSpace id=100 bugReq=dasf something=Else-ish with Whitespace'
    )

$Results = foreach ($IS_Item in $InStuff)
    {
    # this requires that spaces ONLY be found as delimiters
    #    if you have embedded spaces, some sort of data format adjustment will be required
    #    now there is a need for handline embedded whitespace
    #$IS_Item -replace ' ', [environment]::NewLine |
    $IS_Item -replace '(\w{1,}=)', ('{0}{1}' -f [environment]::NewLine, '$1') |
        ConvertFrom-StringData |
        ForEach-Object {
            [PSCustomObject]@{
                TS = $_.ts
                System = $_.system
                Something = $_.something
                }
            }
    }

$Results

output on screen ...

TS         System                                       Something               
--         ------                                       ---------               
2019-01-16 irgendwas                                    else                    
2019-01-16 PC-001                                       OtherElse               
2019-01-16 PC-666                                       ThisELse                
2019-01-16 PC-123                                       AnotherElse             
2019-01-16 PC-004 Oo-LaLa another value with WhiteSpace Else-ish with Whitespace

it's a proper collection of simple objects, so it will Export-CSV quite neatly. [grin]

6
  • Nicely done, but as for piping to ForEach-Object with a [pscustomobject] cast to construct custom objects with only the properties of interest, in order (assuming extraction of a property subset is truly needed): ConvertFrom-StringData | Select-Object ts, system, something is not only more concise, but also performs better.
    – mklement0
    Jan 28 '19 at 13:57
  • Also, while it's not a problem with the sample input, it's worth mentioning in general that ConvertFrom-StringData interprets \ chars. as starting escape sequences so that for instance, a value such as b\c breaks the command: 'a=b\c' | ConvertFrom-StringData
    – mklement0
    Jan 28 '19 at 13:58
  • 1
    @mklement0 - yep, there are distinct trade-offs with ConvertFrom-StringData. it's quite picky ... and it's picky in ways that are not immediately obvious.
    – Lee_Dailey
    Jan 28 '19 at 14:05
  • Indeed; on the plus side, it is much faster than the manual foreach-loop parsing in my answer.
    – mklement0
    Jan 28 '19 at 14:08
  • @Lee_Dailey: Hey Lee thanks again for your input - i run into a new problem in this case! Sometimes in the log file there are entries they are go over multiple lines but each new entry begin with ts= How we can handle this situation with your solution?
    – igge
    Feb 26 '19 at 22:35
1

Assuming that each line's list of key-value pairs only contain values without embedded whitespace or quoting:

# Sample input line.
$line = 'ts=2019-01-16 network=1.1.1.1 system=irgendwas pid1=100 bugReq=dasf something=else maybe=this'

# Parse the line into key-value pairs and create a variable for each.
$i = 0
foreach ($keyOrValue in $line -split '[= ]') {
  if ($i++ % 2 -eq 0) { $varName = $keyOrValue }
  else                { Set-Variable $varName $keyOrValue }
}

# $ts now contains '2019-01-16', $network '1.1.1.1', $system 'irgendwas', ...

Note how I've modified your sample input line slightly to change pid to pid1, because PowerShell won't allow you to create a $PID variable, because it is an automatic variable reflecting the current session's PID (process ID).

Another option (which would also avoid the variable-name conflict) is to create a hashtable for each input line:

# Sample input line.
$line = 'ts=2019-01-16 network=1.1.1.1 system=irgendwas pid=100 bugReq=dasf something=else maybe=this'

# Parse the line into key-value pairs and create a variable for each.
$htValues = @{} # Initialize the hashtable.
$i = 0
foreach ($keyOrValue in $line -split '[= ]') {
  if ($i++ % 2 -eq 0) { $varName = $keyOrValue }
  else                { $htValues[$varName] = $keyOrValue }
}

# $htValues now has keys 'ts', 'network', 'system' with corresponding
# values, so you can access $htValues.ts to get '2019-01-16', for instance.

This approach has the added advantage of lending itself to collecting the hashtables created for the individual lines in an overall array (e.g., $hashTableArray = foreach ($line in ...) { ... } - though with a really big file that may not be an option.

Borrowing an idea from Lee_Dailey's answer, you can alternatively use the ConvertFrom-StringData cmdlet to create the hashtable, after first placing each key-value pair onto its own line with the help of the -replace operator:

$htValues = ConvertFrom-StringData ($line -replace ' ', "`n")

The caveat re ConvertFrom-StringData is that it interprets \ chars. as starting escape sequences; for instance, a value such as b\c breaks the command:

Convertfrom-StringData 'a=b\c' # ERROR: "parsing 'b\c' - Missing control character."

On the plus side, use of ConvertFrom-StringData is much faster than manual parsing with foreach.


As an aside: PowerShell's Get-Content cmdlet for reading lines one by one (by default) is convenient, but slow.

To process a (large) text file's lines one by one more quickly, use :

$file = 'file.txt'
foreach ($line in [System.IO.File]::ReadLines((Convert-Path $file))) {
  # ...
}
0

So how the log you are showing me works looks like there are 3 sections we can cut and paste from Object, Which can be returned from new line Keypair, Which can be returned from empty space Key, which can be returned from removing =

I wrote a function for this case using that idea

function ConvertTo-PsObjectArrayList($Text,$TextObjectSeparator,$KeyPairSeparator,$KeySeparator){
    $ArrayList = New-Object System.Collections.ArrayList
    $TestData -split $TextObjectSeparator | %{
        $PsObject = new-object System.Management.Automation.PSObject
        $_ -split $KeyPairSeparator | %{      
            $KeyPair = $_ -split $KeySeparator
            $PsObject | Add-Member -MemberType NoteProperty -Name $KeyPair[0] -Value $KeyPair[1]
        }
        $ArrayList.Add($PsObject) | out-null
    }
    return $ArrayList
}

$TestData = @'
ts=2019-01-16 network=1.1.1.1 system=irgendwas pid=100 bugReq=dasf something=else maybe=this
ts=2019-01-16 network=1.1.2.1 system=irgendwas pid=130 bugReq=dasf something=else
ts=2019-01-16 network=1.1.1.1 system=irgendwas pid=150 bugReq=dasf something=else maybe=this
ts=2019-01-16 network=1.1.1.1 system=irgendwas pid=110 bugReq=dasf something=else
'@

ConvertTo-PsObjectArrayList -Text $TestData -TextObjectSeparator "`r`n" -KeyPairSeparator " " -KeySeparator "=" | select TS, System, Something

This would return

ts         system    something
--         ------    ---------
2019-01-16 irgendwas else     
2019-01-16 irgendwas else     
2019-01-16 irgendwas else     
2019-01-16 irgendwas else

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.