45

Consider the following code:

int* p1 = new int[100];
int* p2 = new int[100];
const ptrdiff_t ptrDiff = p1 - p2;

int* p1_42 = &(p1[42]);
int* p2_42 = p1_42 + ptrDiff;

Now, does the Standard guarantee that p2_42 points to p2[42]? If not, is it always true on Windows, Linux or webassembly heap?

  • 3
    There isn't even a guarantee that int objects are sizeof(int) aligned (it's the case on all ABI I know, but there are exception to almost all rules in programming, so some ABI may not be that way); when it isn't the case, the code obviously cannot be guaranteed to work. – curiousguy Jan 29 at 7:57
  • 1
    @curiousguy There's no particular reason not to align on byte boundaries on Intel except performance. If instead of int, we used struct i5 { int i[5]; }; in practise p1 and p2 would not be sizeof(i5) aligned. – Martin Bonner Jan 29 at 10:45
  • A follow-up question (though asked earlier): What is the rationale for limitations on pointer arithmetic or comparison? – xskxzr Jan 30 at 3:25
51

To add the standard quote:

expr.add#5

When two pointer expressions P and Q are subtracted, the type of the result is an implementation-defined signed integral type; this type shall be the same type that is defined as std::ptrdiff_­t in the <cstddef> header ([support.types]).

  • (5.1) If P and Q both evaluate to null pointer values, the result is 0.

  • (5.2) Otherwise, if P and Q point to, respectively, elements x[i] and x[j] of the same array object x, the expression P - Q has the value i−j.

  • (5.3) Otherwise, the behavior is undefined. [ Note: If the value i−j is not in the range of representable values of type std::ptrdiff_­t, the behavior is undefined. — end note  ]

(5.1) does not apply as the pointers are not nullptrs. (5.2) does not apply because the pointers are not into the same array. So, we are left with (5.3) - UB.

  • 4
    5.2 could apply if you have a special allocator (I think) – sudo rm -rf slash Jan 28 at 12:25
  • 8
    @sudorm-rfslash: Dangerous territory. Arrays are objects, but allocators only create storage and not objects. The two arrays are two distinct objects. In between, the implementation may have reserved space for its own overhead regardless of the allocator used. Commonly the implementation stores the number of elements to destroy. (There's a bit of a Standards debate how arrays formally can grow element by element, but that's mostly a std::vector thing. new[100] is a one-shot operation) – MSalters Jan 28 at 12:59
  • 4
    @sudorm-rfslash 5.2 does not apply even for 2 different subarrays (subobjects of one complete object) of a multidimensional array (e.g. int a[2][3]; &a[1][0] - &a[0][2]; is UB) and you want it to apply in case when 2 complete array objects are created in the same buffer (e.g. array of unsigned char)... – Language Lawyer Jan 28 at 13:44
  • 3
    @Joker_vD: That's not guaranteed to be meaningful. uintptr_t has enough bits to hold a pointer value, that's it. – MSalters Jan 29 at 8:22
  • 1
    @curiousguy pointer value origin is only relevant when you do integer arithmetic to subvert the rule about UB in pointer arithmetic. If you don't try to convert back from integer to pointer, there's no UB — you just get the integral results you would if you'd written it in assembly. – Ruslan Jan 29 at 14:18
28
const ptrdiff_t ptrDiff = p1 - p2;

This is undefined behavior. Subtraction between two pointers is well defined only if they point to elements in the same array. ([expr.add] ¶5.3).

When two pointer expressions P and Q are subtracted, the type of the result is an implementation-defined signed integral type; this type shall be the same type that is defined as std::ptrdiff_­t in the <cstddef> header ([support.types]).

  • If P and Q both evaluate to null pointer values, the result is 0.
  • Otherwise, if P and Q point to, respectively, elements x[i] and x[j] of the same array object x, the expression P - Q has the value i−j.
  • Otherwise, the behavior is undefined

And even if there was some hypothetical way to obtain this value in a legal way, even that summation is illegal, as even a pointer+integer summation is restricted to stay inside the boundaries of the array ([expr.add] ¶4.2)

When an expression J that has integral type is added to or subtracted from an expression P of pointer type, the result has the type of P.

  • If P evaluates to a null pointer value and J evaluates to 0, the result is a null pointer value.
  • Otherwise, if P points to element x[i] of an array object x with n elements,81 the expressions P + J and J + P (where J has the value j) point to the (possibly-hypothetical) element x[i+j] if 0≤i+j≤n and the expression P - J points to the (possibly-hypothetical) element x[i−j] if 0≤i−j≤n.
  • Otherwise, the behavior is undefined.
  • Is there a reason the standard let's you create a pointer to an element one past the end of an array? – Vaelus Jan 28 at 17:02
  • 4
    @Vaelus This makes it easier to write loops which increment a pointer at each step. For example, otherwise for (char *x = xs; x < (xs + sizeof(xs)); x++) {...} would be illegal because it increments x past the end of its array just before aborting. – amalloy Jan 28 at 17:24
  • 4
    @amalloy would be illegal because it increments x past the end of its array just before aborting It would become illegal before the first increment — in xs + sizeof(xs). – Language Lawyer Jan 28 at 17:26
  • 1
    @LanguageLawyer But that is explicitly allowed, or am I misreading? You can point to the hypothetical one-past-the-end element of an array (as long as you don't dereference), so both xs + sizeof(xs) as well as x being equal to that value are allowed. – Max Langhof Jan 29 at 8:36
  • 3
    @MaxLanghof: AFAICT LanguageLawyer is just saying that, _if xs + sizeof(xs) was illegal (BUT IT'S NOT), you'd get UB even just at the first evaluation of the condition, just before incrementing, as it's there that the xs + sizeof(xs) subexpression is evaluated for the first time. That being said, as shown above, creating a pointer to the "one-past-last" element is explicitly allowed (as long as you don't dereference it) and is common idiom. – Matteo Italia Jan 29 at 8:47
9

The third line is Undefined Behavior, so the Standard allows anything after that.

It's only legal to subtract two pointers pointing to (or after) the same array.

Windows or Linux aren't really relevant; compilers and especially their optimizers are what breaks your program. For instance, an optimizer might recognize that p1 and p2 both point to the begin of an int[100] so p1-p2 has to be 0.

  • 3
    Since the third line is Undefined Behavior, the Standard allows anything before that as well :( – Mooing Duck Jan 28 at 23:27
7

The Standard allows for implementations on platforms where memory is divided into discrete regions which cannot be reached from each other using pointer arithmetic. As a simple example, some platforms use 24-bit addresses that consist of an 8-bit bank number and a 16-bit address within a bank. Adding one to an address that identifies the last byte of a bank will yield a pointer to the first byte of that same bank, rather than the first byte of the next bank. This approach allows address arithmetic and offsets to be computed using 16-bit math rather than 24-bit math, but requires that no object span a bank boundary. Such a design would impose some extra complexity on malloc, and would likely result in more memory fragmentation than would otherwise occur, but user code wouldn't generally need to care about the partitioning of memory into banks.

Many platforms do not have such architectural restrictions, and some compilers which are designed for low-level programming on such platforms will allow address arithmetic to be performed between arbitrary pointers. The Standard notes that a common way of treating Undefined Behavior is "behaving during translation or program execution in a documented manner characteristic of the environment", and support for generalized pointer arithmetic in environments that support it would fit nicely under that category. Unfortunately, the Standard fails to provide any means of distinguishing implementations that behave in such useful fashion and those which don't.

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