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I have a problem with this Code.The answer is 26 14 26 26.

Problem is, i keep finding x as 13.After the first fun function x and xptr becomes 13 but I can not figure out how it becomes 26.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
int* fun(int *a){
    *a = *a +5;
    return a;
}
int main(){
    int x, y, *xpntr, *ypntr;
    x = 3;
    xpntr = &x;
    fun(xpntr);
    y = 10 + (*xpntr / 2);
    ypntr = fun(xpntr);
    *ypntr = *xpntr + *ypntr;
    cout << x << " " << y << " " << *xpntr << " " << *ypntr << endl;
}
  • 6
    It sounds like you may need to learn how to use a debugger to step through your code. With a good debugger, you can execute your program line by line and see where it is deviating from what you expect. This is an essential tool if you are going to do any programming. Further reading: How to debug small programs and Debugging Guide – NathanOliver Jan 28 at 19:39
  • You beat me to it, NathanOliver. @yesidaladam: your next step is absolutely to FAMILIARIZE YOURSELF with your debugger, and SINGLE-STEP through your program. Inspect the value at each step. Q: What is your compiler? Does it have an IDE? Which debugger(s) are available to you? Please update your post with the answers. – paulsm4 Jan 28 at 19:41
  • Hint: in particular, to verify whether you are correct to believe that ypntr and xpntr point to different storage. – Tommy Jan 28 at 19:41
3

Let's go through your code step by step

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
int* fun(int *a){

The next line means: "get the value from the location where pointer a is pointing to, add 5 to it, and write it to the location pointer a is pointing to." This does not change the pointer itself!

    *a = *a +5;

Next return the pointer a, which is just the same value as was passed to the function

    return a;
}

int main(){
    int x, y, *xpntr, *ypntr;
    x = 3;

Assign to xpntr the memory location of x

    xpntr = &x;

Call fun with xpntr, discard what it returns. x will then be 3+5 = 8

    fun(xpntr);

Assign to y the result of 10 + ( value of what xpntr is pointing to / 2) – xpntr isn't changed by this. y = 10 + (8/2) = 14

    y = 10 + (*xpntr / 2);

Call fun with xpntr, something happens to what xpntr is pointing to, but as we already learnt, xpntr itself is not changed in the process. The value returned by fun (which is just xpntr) is assigned to ypntr. x will be changed again to 8 + 5 = 13

    ypntr = fun(xpntr);

Assign to where ypntr is pointing to (which is right now identical to xpntr to the sum of what's pointed to by xpntr and ypntr. So x will then be 13 + 13 = 26 ← this is where your 26 comes from!

    *ypntr = *xpntr + *ypntr;

Print the values of where xpntr and ypntr point to.

    cout << x << " " << y << " " << *xpntr << " " << *ypntr << endl;
}
4

Before your ypntr = fun(xpntr); line, x=8, and xpntr points to x.

Now's the tricky part: ypntr = fun(xpntr) changes the value of x to 13. And fun is returning a reference to x -- ypntr now points to x as well.

This means that both xptr and yptr will point to the same data.

Your last statement (*ypntr = *xpntr + *ypntr) simply doubles the value of x.

+---------------------------+----+----+------+------+
|           code            | x  | y  | xptr | yptr |
+---------------------------+----+----+------+------+
| x = 3;                    |  3 | ?  | ?    | ?    |
| xpntr = &x;               |  3 | ?  | &x   | ?    |
| fun(xpntr);               |  8 | ?  | &x   | ?    |
| y = 10 + (*xpntr / 2);    |  8 | 14 | &x   | ?    |
| ypntr = fun(xpntr);       | 13 | 14 | &x   | &x   |
| *ypntr = *xpntr + *ypntr; | 26 | 14 | &x   | &x   |
+---------------------------+----+----+------+------+

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