19

I'm trying to convert some old code from using sklearn to Keras implementation. Since it is crucial to maintain the same way of operation, I want to understand if I'm doing it correctly.

I've converted most of the code already, however I'm having trouble with sklearn.svm SVC classifier conversion. Here is how it looks right now:

from sklearn.svm import SVC
model = SVC(kernel='linear', probability=True)
model.fit(X, Y_labels)

Super easy, right. However, I couldn't find the analog of SVC classifier in Keras. So, what I've tried is this:

from keras.models import Sequential
from keras.layers import Dense

model = Sequential()
model.add(Dense(64, activation='relu'))
model.add(Dense(1, activation='softmax'))
model.compile(loss='squared_hinge',
              optimizer='adadelta',
              metrics=['accuracy'])
model.fit(X, Y_labels)

But, I think that it is not correct by any means. Could you, please, help me find an alternative of the SVC classifier from sklearn in Keras?

Thank you.

3
  • What exactly do you mean by "alternative"? Keras is specifically a neural network framework, and it does not include SVM functionality...
    – desertnaut
    Jan 29, 2019 at 9:49
  • 1
    Yes, it does not come out of the box, but you can compose a model that will be the alternative of SVM loss function found in sklearn-kit. This kind of the model is proposed below in the answer.
    – none32
    Jan 30, 2019 at 20:49
  • OK, the "alternative" meaning was not clear to me, but since you got a meaningful answer all good (when you see roughly 2 questions/month complaining, say, about low accuracy in regression settings, the assumption that the OP knows exactly what he/she is talking about starts feeling not that solid... :)
    – desertnaut
    Jan 30, 2019 at 22:52

3 Answers 3

19

If you are making a classifier, you need squared_hinge and regularizer, to get the complete SVM loss function as can be seen here. So you will also need to break your last layer to add regularization parameter before performing activation, I have added the code here.

These changes should give you the output

from keras.regularizers import l2
from keras.models import Sequential
from keras.layers import Dense

model = Sequential()
model.add(Dense(64, activation='relu'))
model.add(Dense(1), kernel_regularizer=l2(0.01))
model.add(activation('softmax'))
model.compile(loss='squared_hinge',
              optimizer='adadelta',
              metrics=['accuracy'])
model.fit(X, Y_labels)

Also hinge is implemented in keras for binary classification, so if you are working on a binary classification model, use the code below.

from keras.regularizers import l2
from keras.models import Sequential
from keras.layers import Dense

model = Sequential()
model.add(Dense(64, activation='relu'))
model.add(Dense(1), kernel_regularizer=l2(0.01))
model.add(activation('linear'))
model.compile(loss='hinge',
              optimizer='adadelta',
              metrics=['accuracy'])
model.fit(X, Y_labels)

If you cannot understand the article or have issues with the code, feel free to comment. I had this same issue a while back, and this GitHub thread helped me understand, maybe go through it too, some of the ideas here are directly from here https://github.com/keras-team/keras/issues/2588

6
  • Thanks a lot, especially for the references, they've helped a lot, not just to get the ready-to-use solution, but to understand what is going under the hood. In my case it's a multi class classifier, so I'm using squared_hinge loss function. As far as I understood, the only difference between my code and that one you are provided is a utilization of regularizer and, by the way, this is the only part that I cannot understand now. I'll dig up more myself, because I'm not familiar with L2 regularizer at all.
    – none32
    Jan 30, 2019 at 20:45
  • can you explain why the last dense layer has only 1 node? Feb 22, 2020 at 7:13
  • 1
    Also explain W_regularizer as I am getting errors using that. Feb 22, 2020 at 7:30
  • When I try a similar code on mnist dataset, it gives very poor results like 10-11% accuracy.
    – Nitin1901
    Sep 10, 2020 at 3:13
  • @Chhaganlaal there is no parameter as such. You can use kernel_regularizer or bias_ instead
    – Nitin1901
    Sep 10, 2020 at 3:14
2

If you are using Keras 2.0 then you need to change the following lines of anand v sing's answer.

W_regularizer -> kernel_regularizer

Github link

model.add(Dense(nb_classes, kernel_regularizer=regularizers.l2(0.0001)))
model.add(Activation('linear'))
model.compile(loss='squared_hinge',
                      optimizer='adadelta', metrics=['accuracy'])

Or You can use follow

top_model = bottom_model.output
  top_model = Flatten()(top_model)
  top_model = Dropout(0.5)(top_model)
  top_model = Dense(64, activation='relu')(top_model)
  top_model = Dense(2, kernel_regularizer=l2(0.0001))(top_model)
  top_model = Activation('linear')(top_model)
  
  model = Model(bottom_model.input, top_model)
  model.compile(loss='squared_hinge',
                      optimizer='adadelta', metrics=['accuracy'])
  

1
0

You can use SVM with Keras implementation suing scikeras. It is a Scikit-Learn API wrapper for Keras. It was first release in May 2020. Below I have attached the official documentation link for it. I hope you will find your answer over there.

https://pypi.org/project/scikeras/#description

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