1

When running the JUnit test case with Mockito, I am getting null value returned from below manager.managerLogString method (method of @InjectMocks ArticleManager class).

TestingString = manager.managerLogString();

At mean time, I am able to get correct "UserInput" value for below mockito verify method.

verify(user).setMyuserString("UserInput");

The complete code as captured below, appreciate if you could provide advice.

package com;

public class User {
  private String userString;

  public User() {}

  public void setMyuserString(String userString) {
     this.userString = userString;
  }

  public String logMyUserString() {
      return this.userString;
  }
}

Article Manager:

package com;

import javax.inject.Inject;

public class ArticleManager{

  @Inject
  private User user;

  public String managerLogString() {
      return this.user.logMyUserString();
  }
}

Tests:

package com;
import static org.junit.Assert.*;
import static org.mockito.Mockito.*;
import org.junit.Test;
import org.junit.runner.RunWith;
import org.mockito.runners.MockitoJUnitRunner;
import org.mockito.Captor;
import org.mockito.InjectMocks;  
import org.mockito.Mock;


@RunWith(MockitoJUnitRunner.class)
public class MockExample {
@Mock User user;
@InjectMocks private ArticleManager manager; 
private String TestingString;

@Test
public void test() {
    user.setMyuserString("UserInput");
            // verify this mock class return correct value
    verify(user).setMyuserString("UserInput");

            // why this manager.managerLogString return null value ??
    TestingString = manager.managerLogString();
    System.out.println(TestingString);

    assertEquals("UserInput", TestingString);
}
}

With the advice from here, the code is working fine now. The updated code as captured below.

Updated code:

@Test
public void test() {
    when(user.logMyUserString()).thenReturn("UserInput");

    TestingString = manager.managerLogString();
    verify(user).logMyUserString();

    System.out.println(TestingString);

    assertEquals("UserInput", TestingString);
}
2
  • 1
    GhostCat, I have just accepted the answer. Thanks a lot for your speedy advice. I have gotten the code work now. Thanks again for explaining the Mock concept too and i understand better now. By the way, do I need the post the working code here ? – Leanne Jan 30 '19 at 15:09
  • I appreciate the quick accept! You can add a self answer, when you think that "real" code will be extra helpful for future readers. Feel free to do that (but in most cases, people still keep the accept on that "other" answer that helped them coming up with their own complete solution ... that is how I handle things) – GhostCat Jan 30 '19 at 15:11
1

Here:

@Mock
User user;

Then you go:

user.setMyuserString("UserInput");
// verify this mock class return correct value
verify(user).setMyuserString("UserInput");

And that simply doesn't make any sense. You are mocking that class. That means you create an object that says "I am an user", but in reality, it is not. In other words: the only thing you want/need to do is to tell your mock to return the expected value when its logMyUserString() is called!

As in:

when(user.logMyUserString()).thenReturn("User Input");

and now, when you are correctly using @InjectMocks calls logMyUserString() and the mock will return the string you told it to return. But you want to see here to understand how easily injecting can go wrong.

There is no point in using the setter method because that setter is "artificial", it doesn't set anything!

Beyond that: why do you have the @Inject annotation in your production code classes? If you think you need them for mockito, err, no, you don't.

Finally: I think you should go back and look at a good Mockito tutorial. Your real problem is that you lack understanding of what you are doing.

2
  • Am i right to say that the value set in logMyUserString method can be used by the InjectMock Manager logic for test verification ? And i can use mockito verify method to check whether logMyUserString method called by InjectMock class right ? By the way, i use @Inject because i need to use CDI for EJB with beans.xml in production, and understand it is supported by Mockito right ? – Leanne Jan 30 '19 at 10:15
  • No, please read my answer again. You are interacting with a MOCK object. The methods you are calling are all EMPTY. They do NOTHING. Your setter doesnt set an internal field. If you want a getter method on a mock to return something, you have to use when(thatMock.getThatValue()).thenReturn(whatever). You only use verify() when you want to verify that a method was called. That is not what you need here! As told, and as explained in that tutorial I linked to. – GhostCat Jan 30 '19 at 10:29
0

You did not create an instance of ArticleManager

try this way

@RunWith(MockitoJUnitRunner.class)
public class MockExample {
@Mock User user;
@InjectMocks private ArticleManager manager = new ArticleManager(); 
private String TestingString;
1
  • Wrong: "@InjectMocks creates an instance of the class and injects the mocks that are created with the @Mock (or @Spy) annotations into this instance." If used correctly, that call to new isn't required – GhostCat Jan 30 '19 at 11:32

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