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Disclaimer: I'm new to the REST school of thought, and I'm trying to wrap my mind around it.

So, I'm reading this page, Common REST Mistakes, and I've found I'm completely baffled by the section on sessions being irrelevant. This is what the page says:

There should be no need for a client to "login" or "start a connection." HTTP authentication is done automatically on every message. Client applications are consumers of resources, not services. Therefore there is nothing to log in to! Let's say that you are booking a flight on a REST web service. You don't create a new "session" connection to the service. Rather you ask the "itinerary creator object" to create you a new itinerary. You can start filling in the blanks but then get some totally different component elsewhere on the web to fill in some other blanks. There is no session so there is no problem of migrating session state between clients. There is also no issue of "session affinity" in the server (though there are still load balancing issues to continue).

Okay, I get that HTTP authentication is done automatically on every message - but how? Is the username/password sent with every request? Doesn't that just increase attack surface area? I feel like I'm missing part of the puzzle.

Would it be bad to have a REST service, say, /session, that accepts a GET request, where you'd pass in a username/password as part of the request, and returns a session token if the authentication was successful, that could be then passed along with subsequent requests? Does that make sense from a REST point of view, or is that missing the point?

  • every request is always authenticated, session hijacking is a thing. restful makes this more obvious but not more exposed. – Jasen Mar 14 '18 at 21:50
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To be RESTful, each HTTP request should carry enough information by itself for its recipient to process it to be in complete harmony with the stateless nature of HTTP.

Okay, I get that HTTP authentication is done automatically on every message - but how?

Yes, the username and password is sent with every request. The common methods to do so are basic access authentication and digest access authentication. And yes, an eavesdropper can capture the user's credentials. One would thus encrypt all data sent and received using Transport Layer Security (TLS).

Would it be bad to have a REST service, say, /session, that accepts a GET request, where you'd pass in a username/password as part of the request, and returns a session token if the authentication was successful, that could be then passed along with subsequent requests? Does that make sense from a REST point of view, or is that missing the point?

This would not be RESTful since it carries state but it is however quite common since it's a convenience for users; a user does not have to login each time.

What you describe in a "session token" is commonly referred to as a login cookie. For instance, if you try to login to your Yahoo! account there's a checkbox that says "keep me logged in for 2 weeks". This is essentially saying (in your words) "keep my session token alive for 2 weeks if I login successfully." Web browsers will send such login cookies (and possibly others) with each HTTP request you ask it to make for you.

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    This answer makes no sense to me. First, it says that it is OK to pass the login and password each time and thus also once, which makes sense. Then, the idea to return to the client the successful login state in the form of a token is suggested. If needed, the token could encode the time of creation. We are certainly allowed to return information back to the client. So, this suggestion seems fine to me. The answer says that it is not fine because "it carries state," but isn't the idea of "ST" in "REST" that state can be transferred in between the client and the server? – user2066805 May 22 '16 at 7:09
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It is not uncommon for a REST service to require authentication for every HTTP request. For example, Amazon S3 requires that every request have a signature that is derived from the user credentials, the exact request to perform, and the current time. This signature is easy to calculate on the client side, can be quickly verified by the server, and is of limited use to an attacker who intercepts it (since it is based on the current time).

  • I love this approach. Will start using it right away. – Thomas Ahle Aug 16 '10 at 23:58
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    +1 can you please elaborate on : is of limited use to an attacker who intercepts it (since it is based on the current time) ? arent you talking about a cookie which contains encrypted username and password ? like SO does ? (IMHO) – Royi Namir Apr 14 '13 at 5:09
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    @RoyiNamir: I am not talking about a cookie. The signature used by S3 is a parameter to the HTTP request, but is not a cookie, it is recalculated for every request. – Greg Hewgill Apr 14 '13 at 7:37
  • So if I need to save some information about a user , where would i save it ? in db ? I dont want to go each request to db.... and still i want to use rest....can you please help ? – Royi Namir Apr 14 '13 at 7:41
  • @RoyiNamir: If you have specific questions about how to accomplish some goal, please ask a new question. I can't answer additional questions here in the comments. – Greg Hewgill Apr 14 '13 at 7:46
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Many people don't understand REST principales very clearly, using a session token doesn't mean always you're stateful, the reason to send username/password with each request is only for authentication and the same for sending a token (generated by login process) just to decide if the client has permission to request data or not, you only violate REST convetions when you use weither username/password or session tokens to decide what data to show ! instead you have to use them only for athentication (to show data or not to show data)

in your case i say YES this is RESTy, but try avoiding using native php sessions in your REST API and start generating your own hashed tokens that expire in determined periode of time!

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    thank you. why should one avoid native php session and use own hash tokens instead? – Matthew Sep 26 '15 at 20:06
  • not any brilliant reason i say, just for more security and more control. – EvilThinker Nov 24 '15 at 15:51
  • This is better than the accepted answer. At the least, it accepts the suggestion as RESTy, which makes sense. However, I don't see why the passed information cannot be used to do user dependent authorization. Some users might have access to some data and others not. That does not make the protocol non RESTful. – user2066805 May 22 '16 at 7:24
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No, it doesn't miss the point. Google's ClientLogin works in exactly this way with the notable exception that the client is instructed to go to the "/session" using a HTTP 401 response. But this doesn't create a session, it only creates a way for clients to (temporarily) authenticate themselves without passing the credentials in the clear, and for the server to control the validity of these temporary credentials as it sees fit.

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    @unforgiven3 As long as the returned token is only used to authenticate the user and not used by the server to associate the user to other state stored on the server, then I see no REST constraints being violated. – Darrel Miller Jul 18 '10 at 15:51
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    @unforgiven3 The token returned by the server is, in effect, proof the user is who they say they are. So, instead of each request including user name and password, each request includes the token which is constructed in such a way that the server can be confident of its veracity. – Darrel Miller Jul 18 '10 at 16:23
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    @unforgiven3, Darrel is right. The token echoed back would have to be sent by the client on every HTTP request, just like in basic, digest authentication, until the token expires. When that happens the client can repeat the login, optionally asking the user for credentials, or whatever. I could elaborate the answer, if you want. edit: (And thanks for keeping up with answers to old questions!) – mogsie Jul 18 '10 at 17:50
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    No problem, mogsie, always interesting to discuss these types of things :-) I think I see where you guys are going with this, unfortunately I just don't understand enough about digest authentication to really grasp this (mostly I just don't understand how the token is sent back each HTTP request, but that seems to be an implementation detail). However, I do now see why this method does not violate REST principles. Thanks for the responses! – Rob Jul 18 '10 at 18:00
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    @unforgiven3, This may help: the token is a signed piece of information. So it is self-contained. The server can validate the token without checking a previously-stored state. So it is just a state that is stored on the client and transferred back and forth. – Iravanchi Jun 2 '14 at 8:03
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Okay, I get that HTTP authentication is done automatically on every message - but how?

"Authorization:" HTTP header send by client. Either basic (plain text) or digest.

Would it be bad to have a REST service, say, /session, that accepts a GET request, where you'd pass in a username/password as part of the request, and returns a session token if the authentication was successful, that could be then passed along with subsequent requests? Does that make sense from a REST point of view, or is that missing the point?

The whole idea of session is to make stateful applications using stateless protocol (HTTP) and dumb client (web browser), by maintaining the state on server's side. One of the REST principles is "Every resource is uniquely addressable using a universal syntax for use in hypermedia links". Session variables are something that cannot be accessed via URI. Truly RESTful application would maintain state on client's side, sending all the necessary variables over by HTTP, preferably in the URI.

Example: search with pagination. You'd have URL in form

http://server/search/urlencoded-search-terms/page_num

It's has a lot in common with bookmarkable URLs

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    Authentication information is not accessable via URI either, though - everyone is talking about sending auth info as part of the request header. How is that different from including a session token with the request? I'm not saying use the session token in the URI, but in data passed in the request. – Rob Feb 13 '09 at 15:15
  • Authentication establishes if you're authorized to execute that action, and in RESTful application would not affect it's result. – vartec Feb 13 '09 at 15:47
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    A session token also establishes if you're authorized to execute that action. What do you mean it wouldn't affect it's result? If the caller is not authorized, they get a Not Authorized error. Same thing with a session token. I really don't see the difference? – Rob Feb 13 '09 at 16:33
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    No, session token is a handle to state saved on the server. That's just not RESTful. As for the Not Authorized, I don't see that as a result. I'd rather consider that an exception (as in try/catch). – vartec Feb 16 '09 at 13:47
  • Fair enough, vartec - that makes sense. Thanks for the follow-up! – Rob Feb 17 '09 at 3:01
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I think your suggestion is OK, if you want to control the client session life time. I think that RESTful architecture encourages you to develop stateless applications. As @2pence wrote "each HTTP request should carry enough information by itself for its recipient to process it to be in complete harmony with the stateless nature of HTTP" .

However, not always that is the case, sometimes the application needs to tell when client logs-in or logs-out and to maintain resources such as locks or licenses based on this information. See my follow up question for an example of such case.

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