4

In Java sometimes i write the code as follows:

 String obj = null;
 while ((obj = getObject()) != null) {
    // do smth with obj
 }

In Kotlin compile-time error is shown:

Assignments are not expressions, and only expressions are allowed in this context

What's the best equivalent in Kotlin?

11
  • (I know you said not to suggest "better" ways, but that's the way :) ) Jan 31, 2019 at 8:13
  • @FedericoklezCulloca I think OP meant the readLine as an example, and not a way to read lines
    – Lino
    Jan 31, 2019 at 8:14
  • @Lino Right, that was just an example of "assign and check". Updated the question.
    – 4ntoine
    Jan 31, 2019 at 8:14
  • 1
    From: discuss.kotlinlang.org/t/…, you can use: while ({ line = readLine(); line }() != null)
    – Lino
    Jan 31, 2019 at 8:15
  • 2
    @4ntoine got it. Voted to reopen. Jan 31, 2019 at 8:17

5 Answers 5

5

I would rather give up fanciness and do it the old-school way, which is instead most intuitive.

 var obj = getObject();
 while (obj != null) {
    // do smth with obj
    obj = getObject();
 }
1
  • the only pity is that you are writing the same code basically twice then... and the more you do in the while-loop the more it gets hidden... :-/
    – Roland
    Jan 31, 2019 at 11:15
3

The simplest ad-hock solution is probably

while(true) {
    val obj = getObj() ?: break
}

However special cases are IMO best served by specialized helper functions. For example reading a file line by line can be done with a helper readLines as explained in an answer to a similar question:

reader.forEachLine {
    println(it)
}
2
  • 2
    I don't really like the while(true) with a break. I don't think it's a good practice because it's counterintuitive, and hard to debug. It could be useful sometimes for uncommon situations, but it's unusual...
    – Ctorres
    Jan 31, 2019 at 9:44
  • replace getObj() with reader.readLine() and you have the same answer as in the previously duplicated question,... (stackoverflow.com/a/43557893/6202869) (but: no down-vote from me)
    – Roland
    Jan 31, 2019 at 9:55
3

In cases you just want to replace while ((x = y.someFunction()) != null) you may use the following instead:

generateSequence { y.someFunction() }
          .forEach { x -> /* what you did in your while */ }

generateSequence will extract you all the values one by one until the first null is reached. You may replace the .forEach with a reduce or fold (or anything else that seems appropriate ;-)) if you want to keep the last value or sum up the values to something else.

If you need to check against something else, you may just add something like takeIf, e.g.:

generateSequence { y.someFunction().takeIf { /* yourCondition... */ } }

basically just repeating what I also mentioned here.

2
  • 1
    why? I added something about useLines, etc. there, which is not really relevant here.... but I also think this is a duplicate question of the linked one...
    – Roland
    Jan 31, 2019 at 9:48
  • Ah yes, I just saw it earlier and looked almost the same, that's why I mentioned it
    – Lino
    Jan 31, 2019 at 9:58
2

I've tinkered around and have come up with a neat general helper function:

inline fun <T> (() -> T?).untilNull(action: (T) -> Unit) { 
    while (true) action(this() ?: break) 
}

Which can be called like this:

::getObject.untilNull { /* do something with "it" */ }

You can of course don't use this helper function and just stay with the while

while(true){
    val result = getObject() ?: break
    // do something with "result"
}

Also another solution would be to create an inline lambda and then imediatly invoke that:

var result = null
while ({ result = getObject(); result }() != null){
    // do something with "result"
}

This could probably be optimized if you'd "save" the lambda first:

var result = null
var assignment = { result = getObject(); result };
while (assignment() != null){
    // do something with "result"
}
10
  • hmm... except of the untilNull I have seen all the variations of this answer also here... and to be honest... that untilNull-usage looks a bit strange to me...
    – Roland
    Jan 31, 2019 at 9:57
  • @Roland Yes it is odd, because it combines a lot of different things, inline, generics, extension functions, lambdas and of course the elvis operator with a break. It could be written more verbose, but I think that is primarly code style one would like to follow
    – Lino
    Jan 31, 2019 at 10:00
  • 1
    speaking of impact: what is the impact of ::getObject().untilNull... untilNull is inline, so the block is probably ok... but what about that ::getObject() itself? ;-) the overhead you mentioned regarding Stream/Sequence is (depending on the use-case of course) often negligible... The benefits you get: readability, short-circuiting, etc. often overweigh the drawbacks...
    – Roland
    Jan 31, 2019 at 10:11
  • 1
    @Lino I think a better alternative to your last would be while (run { result = getObject(); result != null }) .... Without saving the lambda. Then it'll get inlined (and IMO more readable). Jan 31, 2019 at 13:31
  • 1
    @Roland ::getObject is also a function argument to an inline fun, it'll get inlined too. Jan 31, 2019 at 13:32
0

How about:

while (getObject().apply { obj = this } != null) {
    // ...
}

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