11

We noticed that our iOS app is sending requests to http://app-measurement.com. The body seems to be encrypted or compressed though

:method: POST
:scheme: https
:path: /a
:authority: app-measurement.com
accept: */*
content-type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded
content-encoding: gzip
accept-language: en-gb
content-length: 371
accept-encoding: br, gzip, deflate


 ;

_uwa

_pfoq


_oauto

_r

_c_fݶ- 
...

I already checked if it's gzip but that doesn't seem to be it.

Does anyone know how to decrypt this to be able to see the request content?

2
  • This call is part of Google Analytics for Firebase to report the analytics events from the client. It is heavily compressed to minimize the bandwidth usage. I'm actually not sure if there's a way to see its raw contents, so hope someone else can answer. Jan 31 '19 at 14:24
  • Note that these requests ARE gzipped, but whatever you're using to intercept HTTP requests is already decompressing the body before showing it to you. What you're seeing is a raw protobuf, albeit, probably with character encoding idiosyncrasies that prevent you from actually decoding it as is.
    – Chris
    Sep 4 '21 at 20:17
17

firebaser here

This request is part of Google Analytics for Firebase to report the analytics events from the client. It is heavily compressed to minimize the bandwidth usage.

There is no public API to see the raw contents of the request, but here is where you can find more on the data collected:

  1. The documentation on auto-collected events and auto collected user properties.
  2. The BigQuery schema is a pretty good representation of what we collect (although this also includes some fields which are added on the server, like location information and traffic source, in some cases).
  3. Device logs (e.g. logcat) expose the events/parameters we log.
3
  • 1
    Thanks, that sheds a little light on it. I upvoted but gonna hold off accepting a bit since this doesn't answer the decompression part.
    – hennes
    Jan 31 '19 at 17:08
  • I doubt anyone has a way to decompress. I checked with our product team, and even they have tools for that. It seems the data in the request is (close to a) raw protobuf. If you have more specific questions that are hard to discuss here, feel free to reach out to Firebase support and mention my name. Feb 1 '19 at 20:45
  • You can certainly decompress and view the values in a raw protobuf! Of course the tough part is that most of the values are meaningless without context. But some things like strings have obvious meaning. See my answer below for how to actually decompress and decode these requests. :-D
    – Chris
    Sep 4 '21 at 20:15
1

It's a gzip compressed protobuf. With decoding tools you can see all the values and types which can be useful. Though without the .proto definition it's a struggle to figure out what it all means.

To decode the request, first get it in the raw form. I do this by exporting a HTTP .trace file and extracting just the body. I've had better luck doing the gzip decompression myself.

Once you have the raw request body, decode it like this:

$ gunzip - < request_body > request_uncompressed.bin
$ protoc --decode_raw < request_uncompressed.bin

Here's a simple CyberChef formula that also decodes it for you: https://gchq.github.io/CyberChef/#recipe=Gunzip()Protobuf_Decode('',false,false)

When it works you'll see the raw protobuf values. They'll look something like this (actual values randomized):

1 {
  1: 1
  2 {
    1 {
      1: "_si"
      3: 161212808641
    }
    1 {
      1: "_et"
      3: 57
    }
    1 {
      1: "_sc"
      2: "SomeControllerName"
    }
    1 {
      1: "_o"
      2: "auto"
    }
    2: "_e"
    3: 161236824
    4: 163120534
  }
  2 {
    1 {
      1: "_si"
      3: 1358166110
    }
    1 {
      1: "_sc"
      2: "SomeControllerName"
    }
    1 {
      1: "_o"
      2: "auto"
    }
    2: "_ab"
    3: 161336826
    4: 163123680
  }
  3 {
    1: 163129524107
    2: "_fi"
    4: 1
  }
  3 {
    1: 15514295
    2: "_fot"
    4: 15514241
  }
  3 {
    1: 1530783276
    2: "_sid"
    4: 1530783376
  }
...
  8: "ios"
  9: "13.5"
  10: "iPhone12,3"
...

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