2

I'm making a program checking if a string is palindrome or not and it didn't work at first, did something random to make it work and now I don't know why it works.

Here is the code:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
string s, copie; //copie means copy in romanian
int i, aux, OK;
cout<<"Enter the string/word: "; cin>>s;
copie=s;
for(i=0; i<=copie.length()+1; i++)
{
    aux=copie[i];
    copie[i]=copie[copie.length()-i+1];
    copie[copie.length()-i+1]=aux;
}
OK=1;

for(i=0; i<s.length(); i++)
    if(s[i]!=copie[i])
        OK=0;
if(OK==1)
    cout<<"yes";
else
    cout<<"no";
return 0;
}

Now normally it should have been

for(i=0; i<=copie.length()-1; i++) 

or

for(i=0; i < copie.length(); i++) 

as strings are indexed from 0 and the last character of the string is its length minus 1. But it didn't work at first, so I added some couts to check what was wrong (we could say for debugging purposes) and the copy missed the first two characters. If I entered "cojoc" for example I'd get "@ joc". Was like wtf? Then changed the < for <= and got ojoc, so I added +1 at the end and it works. But it shouldn't, so I'm asking why does it? Am I missing something?

  • for(i=0; i<=copie.length()+1; i++) -- This could never work correctly, especially that inside the for loop, you have copie[i]. If you need convincing that it's totally wrong, replace your usage of [ ] with a call to at(). You will get an out_of_range exception thrown, and no output to ponder as to "why it works". – PaulMcKenzie Jan 31 at 18:55
  • @PaulMcKenzie Then why does it work perfectly on my compiler on any string? – Lastrevio Jan 31 at 18:59
  • 1
    Accessing using [ ] is undefined behavior. You are just lucky it works. To remove the "luck", the at() function will tell you that you're all wrong. – PaulMcKenzie Jan 31 at 19:01
  • @paulmckenzie He knows he is wrong : the question is about why... – Sirmyself Jan 31 at 19:04
  • Pondering undefined behavior is IMO a waste of time. – PaulMcKenzie Jan 31 at 19:05
1

Here's your problem:

for(i=0; i<=copie.length()+1; i++)
{
    aux=copie[i];
    copie[i]=copie[copie.length()-i+1]; // <<<<<
    copie[copie.length()-i+1]=aux;
}

By calculating this index ([copie.length()-i+1]), you subtract i then add 1 to the length. You may think you subtract the sum of i and 1, but subtraction doesn't work like that in math or in programming.

Using parentheses will solve your issues:

for(i=0; i < copie.length(); i++)
{
    aux=copie[i];
    copie[i]=copie[copie.length()-(i+1)]; // <<<<<
    copie[copie.length()-(i+1)]=aux;
}

That said, you code could be more effective. But, since it looks like homework, that's beside the point of the question.

  • To add: I forgot also to add the /2 at the for(i=0; i<copie.length()/2; i++), which if i wouldn't have added would have gave me yes each time (because it wouldn't actually reverse the string, it would reverse it twice thus it would be the same). – Lastrevio Jan 31 at 19:18
  • yes, basically. – Sirmyself Jan 31 at 19:21
  • "That said, you code could be more effective. But, since it looks like homework, that's beside the point of the question." Out of curiosity, how could it be more effective? I wanna learn. @Sirmyself – Lastrevio Jan 31 at 20:10
  • instead of inverting the string, you can directly compare if [first char] == [last char], [second char] == [second last char] and so on up to the middle. as soon as you get a difference, it is not a palindrome – Sirmyself Jan 31 at 20:12
1

The reason your program is working for all strings is because in your loop, you are iterating through every character in the string as you are swapping characters. This means that, once you pass the halfway point, you are acting on characters that you have already swapped and are swapping them again. In essence, you are undoing the reversal by reversing the string again.

Also, as @PaulMcKenzie is saying, you are using copie.length() as your upper bound for the loop, which is just asking for trouble. With a normal array, the last value of i would be accessing an element outside the array, which will either throw an error or access an undefined value (depending on what platform you are running this code on. The reason it is still working here is because C+ terminates strings with an implicit null character (\0), and that is what you are accessing when you use copie[copie.length()]. Normally this would cause issues as you swap the null character with the first character, but since you later swap them back, this behavior corrects itself.

Instead, what you should be doing is iterating through half of the input string, so that you do the reversal and then stop. Also, use copie.length()-1 when dealing with any strings or arrays to get the element in the last index:

for(i = 0; i < copie.length() / 2; i++)
{
  aux=copie[i];
  copie[i]=copie[copie.length()-1-i];
  copie[copie.length()-1-i]=aux;
}

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