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I have 3 questions about below code:

class cb
{
public:
    int y_;
    class iterator
    {
    public:     
        //void func() { y_ = 5; }   // (1)      
    private:
        int x_;
        //cb a;                    // (2)       
    };  
    void funcCB() { }
};

class Human
{
public: 
    void func() const {
        cb c;                        // (3)
        c.funcCB();
    }
    //  (4)
};

1- Why i can't use Outer class's member variable y_ inside Inner class as in (1)?

2- Why i can't create object from Outer class inside inner class as in(2) but i can only create pointer and reference?

3- Why if i moved the line at (3) cb c; to line at (4) i get compile error ?

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Forgive me if I don't quite get this -- my C++ is a little rusty.

Regarding question (1) -- Have you tried the "this" keyword?

E.g.,:

void func() { this->y_ = 5; } 

Here is an example almost identical to yours:

'this' pointer in C++

For question 2, you're asking for a recursive inclusion of an object. That's like saying, What is an Onion? It is a Peel that contains an Onion. Well, that Onion inside is also a Peel that contains an Onion, then a Peel, then an Onion, etc. Without some mechanism to halt (an Onion might be a Core, which contains nothing), the first instantiation of the Onion object would loop infinitely until all memory was used up.

As a reference, the memory can be retrieved only when needed, and not before.

For question 3, I'm taking the lazy way out to say, them's just the rules.

UPDATE: I'm not at work now, so I had more time to do a little more research. As I've said, my C++ is a little rusty.

Essentially for Q 1, what you're attempting to do is access the members of class "cb" from class "iterator". My research indicates that, just because "iterator" is a subclass of "cb", it doesn't get any special access privileges. So you can not access "cb::y_" from "iterator" and you can not use "this->y_" either. Methods (functions) inside the class can access "y_" directly. Sub-classes can not.

Note the following which compiles successfully:

class cb {
    public:
        int y_;
    class iterator {
        public:     
        void func() { 
            cb *z = new cb();
            z->y_ = 5;
        }   // (1)      
        private:
        int x_;
        cb *a;                    // (2)       
        };  
    void funcCB() { }
    };

class Human
{
public: 
void func() const {
cb c;                        // (3)
c.funcCB();
}
//  (4)
    cb *z;
};

This probably is not what you're attempting to accomplish, but I expect that what you want to do can not be done the way you want. Your best bet would be to implement the "iterator" as its own class distinct from "cb" and make it a "friend" class of "cb". Or maybe better yet, and simpler, just include a set of iterator methods inside the class. The methods will have full access to all of the class attributes.

Also note the pointer reference to "cb". It does not compile as a straight object instantiation in a sub-class. Again, the Onion issue.

On a side note, remember that C++ is not Pascal. It's not Java. It can do sub-classes, but as you can see, it doesn't do them very well, or at least, it doesn't do them the way other languages do them. You're better off creating every class completely distinct from every other class, other than normal inheritance. That's sort of unofficially "The C++ Way."

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  • Yes, i have tried this->y_ = 5 with the same error. i use vs2017 c++17. – Islam Abdeen Jan 31 '19 at 23:13

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