2

I have the following C++17 code, to generate a compile-time tuple of arrays, where the zero arrays are just for the sake of example and in my implementation they will be full (compile with -std=c++1z -fconcepts).

#include <array>
#include <tuple>
#include <cmath>

template <std::size_t nrA, std::size_t ncA, std::size_t nrB, std::size_t ncB,
          typename number=double>
constexpr auto operator *(const std::array<std::array<number,ncA>,nrA> & A,
                          const std::array<std::array<number,ncB>,nrB> & B)
{
  std::array<std::array<number,ncB>,nrA> res{} ;
  for (auto k=0u;k<ncB;++k)
    for (auto i=0u;i<nrA;++i)
      for (auto j=0u;j<nrB;++j)
        res[i][k] += A[i][j]*B[j][k];
  return res ;
}

constexpr auto logg2(const auto N)
{
  auto res = 0;
  auto n = N;
  while (n != 0) 
  {
    n /= 2;
    ++res;
  }
  return res;
}

template <std::size_t N,typename number=double>
constexpr auto create_R()
{
  return std::array<std::array<double,2*N>,N>{};
}

template <std::size_t N,typename number=double>
constexpr auto create_RT()
{
  return std::array<std::array<double,N>,2*N>{};
}

template <std::size_t N,std::size_t ...Is>
constexpr auto make_impl(const std::index_sequence<Is...>)
{
  return std::make_tuple(std::make_tuple(create_R<(N >> Is)>()...),
                         std::make_tuple(create_RT<(N >> Is)>()...));
}

template <std::size_t N,typename number=double>
constexpr auto make()
{
  return make_impl<N/2>(std::make_index_sequence<logg2(N/2) - 1>());
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
  const auto n = 4u;
  const auto A = std::array<std::array<double,2*n>,2*n>{};
  const auto [R,RT] = make<2*n>();
}

I would like to modify make<>() to make<>(A), and return a structured binding [R,RT,As] where As is a tuple containing the following arrays in it

                              A,
               std::get<0>(R)*A*std::get<0>(RT),
std::get<1>(R)*std::get<0>(R)*A*std::get<0>(RT)*std::get<1>(RT)
                             ...

I've been trying for a while and found no solution.

Any ideas?

Edit 1

As requested by @MaxLanghof , the following prints the matrices:

template <std::size_t nr, std::size_t nc, typename number=double>
constexpr auto print(const std::array<std::array<number,nc>,nr> & A)
{
  for (auto i=0u;i<nr;++i)
    {
      for (auto j=0u;j<nc;++j)
        std::cout << std::right << std::setw(12) << A[i][j];
      std::cout << std::endl ;
    }
  std::cout << std::endl ;
}

and adding the following lines to main()

print(A);
print(std::get<0>(R)*A*std::get<0>(RT));
print(std::get<1>(R)*std::get<0>(R)*A*std::get<0>(RT)*std::get<1>(RT));

one obtains the following output

       0           0           0           0           0           0           0           0
       0           0           0           0           0           0           0           0
       0           0           0           0           0           0           0           0
       0           0           0           0           0           0           0           0
       0           0           0           0           0           0           0           0
       0           0           0           0           0           0           0           0
       0           0           0           0           0           0           0           0
       0           0           0           0           0           0           0           0

       0           0           0           0
       0           0           0           0
       0           0           0           0
       0           0           0           0

       0           0
       0           0
  • 1
    In general, it would be easier to grasp what you want (including what the correct sizes for all involved arrays and tuples will be, given all the *2 and /2) if you added a small sample "output". From my understanding, A is (in this case) 8x8, the logg2 would return 2, so there will be 2 entries in the R, RT tuples and 3 entries in A. R would contain a 4x8 and a 8x16 matrix, RT an 8x4 and 16x8 matrix, and As would contain A (8x8), and... then the other multiplications won't work. Please check your specifications/code. – Max Langhof Feb 1 at 12:20
  • @MaxLanghof Thanks for your comment. I added the code needed to check the sizes of the matrices do match. The idea is for make(A) to output a std::tuple containing the matrices printed as the third element of the structured binding (element named As). – Astor Feb 1 at 12:52
  • 1
    Oh right, it's a right shift, not a left shift. Sorry for the confusion. – Max Langhof Feb 1 at 12:56
  • @MaxLanghof Thanks for your comment. No problem! I think adding that part of the code improves a lot the post for better understanding and testing. – Astor Feb 1 at 12:58
3

The solution involves creating another index sequence for each of the entries of the As tuple, then using it to fold-express the multiplications. I took the liberty of wrapping std::array<std::array<T, Cols>, Rows> in a type for readability (which also ended up being necessary, see below). Each call to makeMul yields one of the As tuple elements (the original A is added separately).

template <std::size_t Rows, std::size_t Cols, typename T = double>
struct Mat2D : std::array<std::array<T, Cols>, Rows> {};

template <class T_Rs, std::size_t... Is>
constexpr auto mult_lhs(T_Rs Rs, std::index_sequence<Is...>) {
  return (std::get<sizeof...(Is) - Is - 1>(Rs) * ...);
}

template <class T_RTs, std::size_t... Is>
constexpr auto mult_rhs(T_RTs RTs, std::index_sequence<Is...>) {
  return (std::get<Is>(RTs) * ...);
}

template <class T_A, class T_Rs, class T_RTs, std::size_t... Is>
constexpr auto makeMul_impl(T_A A, T_Rs Rs, T_RTs RTs,
                            std::index_sequence<Is...> is) {
  return mult_lhs(Rs, is) * A * mult_rhs(RTs, is);
}

template <std::size_t Index, class T_A, class T_Rs, class T_RTs>
constexpr auto makeMul(T_A A, T_Rs Rs, T_RTs RTs) {
  return makeMul_impl(A, Rs, RTs, std::make_index_sequence<Index + 1>());
}

template <std::size_t N, std::size_t... Is, typename T = double>
constexpr auto make_impl(const Mat2D<2 * N, 2 * N, T>& A,
                         std::index_sequence<Is...>) {
  auto Rs = std::make_tuple(create_R<(N >> Is)>()...);
  auto RTs = std::make_tuple(create_RT<(N >> Is)>()...);
  auto As = std::make_tuple(A, makeMul<Is>(A, Rs, RTs)...);
  return std::make_tuple(Rs, RTs, As);
}

template <std::size_t N, typename T = double>
constexpr auto make(const Mat2D<N, N, T>& A) {
  return make_impl<N / 2>(A, std::make_index_sequence<logg2(N / 2) - 1>());
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
  const auto n = 4u;
  const auto A = Mat2D<2 * n, 2 * n, double>{};
  const auto [Rs, RTs, As] = make(A);
}

Demo

It is important to note that overloading operators for std types is a problem here, at least with clang (which follows the standard more strictly): Once you try to use your overloaded operator* in a template, it won't be found because ADL looks for it in namespace std (I initially had Mat2D as an alias instead of a struct inheriting stuff) - and you are not allowed to add stuff to namespace std (except for a few particular customization points). At least that's how I understand this error.

Inheriting from std types is pretty terrible overall, but I would assume your matrix is in fact a user-defined type in practice so that none of this will matter.

Finally, I would seriously recommend giving actual names to your tuple types. When you have tuples of tuples (of arrays of arrays), every reader will have to invest a significant amount of time even grasping the code. It would already help if you e.g. grouped each R and RT in a struct:

template<std::size_t N, typename T = double>
struct R_RT {
  Mat2D<N, 2 * N, T> R;
  Mat2D<2 * N, N, T> RT;
};

and/or had e.g. a

template<class TupleOfR, class TupleOfRT, class TupleOfAs>
struct Rs_RTs_As {
  TupleOfR Rs;
  TupleOfRT RTs;
  TupleOfAs As;
};

Even if that would technically allow any three types, it still documents what you should expect to find in there, and with concepts, you can actually properly constrain everything (including such fun as "As will have one more element than Rs and RTs", which will probably take most readers a while to realize from the pure tuple code).

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