6

When using this query :

INSERT INTO order (order_quantity)
           VALUES ('50')

I'm getting an error :

You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MariaDB server version for the right syntax to use near 'order (order_quantity) VALUES('50')' at line 146

What's wrong with my query?

9
  • 1
    Please edit your question with a better title and tags, this does not appear to be anything to do with php but rather sql - and which sql is that exactly, please tag it with that. Please add additional clarification of the exact single question in the body of the question. As it stands now, the first sentence appears to be the answer, clarify why that is not so. Feb 1, 2019 at 12:56
  • 3
  • 1
    I edited the title, please update if this is not the actual question. Feb 1, 2019 at 13:02
  • I don't think it's a good idea to edit the title for the OP. Especially when it's not even clear, what the actual question is.
    – Olafant
    Feb 1, 2019 at 13:12
  • 2
    @Olafant Perhaps, but as OP is a new user it is better in my opinion to illustrate to the OP how to improve the question rather than simply closing it as unclear what you are asking when the actual question can be inferred from the original post. Feb 1, 2019 at 13:19

1 Answer 1

18

Reserved words are not recommended for use as database, table, column, variable or other object names. If you desire to use a reserved word is used as an object name in ANSI standard syntax, it must be enclosed in double-quotes to allow the Relational Engine (whichever that one is) that the word is being used as an object and not as a keyword in the given context.

Here are some examples specific to different SQL engines:

order is a SQL Keyword, used to sort results (ORDER BY ...)

Wrap backticks around it if you are using MySQL or Maria DB

INSERT INTO `order` (order_quantity) VALUES ('50');

Wrap brackets around it if you are using MS SQL Server

INSERT INTO [order] (order_quantity) VALUES ('50');

Wrap double quotes around it if you are using pgSQL

INSERT INTO "order" (order_quantity) VALUES ('50');

In example, nothing (but common sense) prevents you from creating a database named INSERT with a table INTO having a column VALUE(42)

enter image description here

Yes, this query works :

USE [INSERT];
SELECT [INTO].[VALUE(42)] FROM [INTO];
7
  • Even a reserved keyword.
    – jarlh
    Feb 1, 2019 at 13:04
  • @jarlh What's the difference?
    – Cid
    Feb 1, 2019 at 13:05
  • And the double quotes delimiting is the ANSI/ISO SQL standard way!
    – jarlh
    Feb 1, 2019 at 13:05
  • @jarlh feel free to edit if you want to add more details
    – Cid
    Feb 1, 2019 at 13:07
  • 1
    Keywords are these words used when defining the SQL syntax. Some are reserved (e.g. ORDER), some are not (e.g. DESC) - according to ANSI SQL. However, products may have other sets of reserved words.
    – jarlh
    Feb 1, 2019 at 13:15

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.