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I am having a hard time understanding the following recursive algorithm in terms of the multiplication operation used in the code.

int power(int a, int b) {
    if (b < 0) {
        return 0;
    } else if (b == 0) {
        return 1;
    } else {           
        return a * power(a, b - 1);
    }
}

For inputs (3,7) the result would be 2187. There are total of 6 recursive calls being made:

Initial values - 3,7
First recursive call(3,6)
Second recursive call(3,5)
Third recursive call(3,4)
Fourth recursive call(3,3)
Fifth recursive call(3,2)
Sixth recursive call(3,1)

Given the following formula:

a * power(a, b - 1)

is each recursive call multiplying the values of a & b? Which wouldn't make sense, since that would return 81 at the end. I am trying to understand the factors and product in the multiplication operation of each recursive call.

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    It's multiplying the values of a and the result of calling power on a and b - 1. I'd recommend a piece of paper and pen/cil. Put in a small value, like (2, 3) or whatever, and just write down each step: what are the values when power is called? Which path through power is taken? What's the return value of each call to power? Little else will help in understanding recursion better than just "playing computer". Feb 1 '19 at 15:10
  • "is each recursive call multiplying the values of a & b?" -- no. Each recursive call but the last is multiplying a by the value returned by the next call. The last (in your case) simply returns 1. Feb 1 '19 at 15:10
  • The idea behind this is a^10 = a * a^9 or a^b = a * a^b-1. If you keep "extracting" an a from that a^b, you will end up with b-1 multiplications. Thats how you transform an exponential expression into multiplications.
    – f1sh
    Feb 1 '19 at 15:13
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You have to keep in mind that a is multiplied by the result of the recursive function call at every step. You might look at it like this:

power(3,7)
= 3 * power(3,6)
= 3 * 3 * power(3,5)
= 3 * 3 * 3 * power(3,4)
= 3 * 3 * 3 * 3 * power(3,3)
= 3 * 3 * 3 * 3 * 3 * power(3,2)
= 3 * 3 * 3 * 3 * 3 * 3 * power(3,1)
= 3 * 3 * 3 * 3 * 3 * 3 * 3 * power(3,0)
= 3 * 3 * 3 * 3 * 3 * 3 * 3 * 1 // by definition when b = 0

At each step we replace the call to power(a,b) with a * power(a,b-1), as the function defines, until we get to power(3,0). Does that help clear up what's going on?

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Your function int power(int a, int b) returns an int. So every time return a * power(a, b - 1); is called, a is multiplied by the value returned by power(a, b - 1) until you get b == 0 which returns 1.

At the end you get:

return (3 * (3 * (3 * (3 * (3 * (3 * (3 * 1)))))));

The value of b is the one that stops the recursivity and make you get a result. If b wasn't decreased, you'd be in an infinite loop.

So to answer to your question, neither a or b are multiplied, since all is in the return value. Only b is decreased to make the number of loops expected.

I hope this helped you understand.

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  • "The value of b is the one that stops the recursivity and make you get a result. If b wasn't decreased, you'd be in an infinite loop." - these 2 lines clarified it for me.
    – sotn
    Feb 4 '19 at 21:40
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 return a * power(a, b - 1);

This line has a lot of information to convey. Actually a the the base and b is the power, which is to be raised to a. Now, each time we multiply a with the returned value, we are actually raising it to some power.
When return statement is executed for the first time, it stores product of a and a call to the power function. During the subsequent calls to power function, the value of b, reduces by 1 every time.
Hence in the end, when recursion, unfolds, you get something like this:

return a*a*a*a*a*a*a*1

Finally in the end, the result is computed and is sent back to the main method. (The calling method)

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actually what is happening here, each call is made with a new value of variables, for instance the last call(3* power(3, 0)) would return 3, as (3* 1) = 3, and last call returns the '1' first, and them back tracks,, for last call b = 0, so 1 is returned which is multiplied with 3, which becomes 3

for rest of calls, this 3 would be simply being multiplied each time,,

for fifth call,

it would return value 3 * 3

for forthh it would return,

3 * 9 ,, and so on

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is each recursive call multiplying the values of a & b? Which wouldn't make sense

This is the wrong assumption. Each recursive call multiplying the values of a & (result of exectuing the same fucntion with a & b-1).

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On your last recursive call (a = 3, b = 0), you are in this case :

} else if (b == 0) {
    return 1;

This means, the previous caller (a = 3, b = 1) that was on the line return a * power(a, b - 1); can be replaced with values return 3 * power(3, 1 - 1); -> return 3 * 1; // 1 being the last recursive call return value.

Taking the previous one (a = 3, b = 2) and doing the same operation

return a * power(a, b - 1);

-->

return 3 * power(3, 2 - 1);

-->

return 3 * 3 * 1; //the result of the a = 3, b = 1 call

And so on...

a = 3, b = 3

return 3 * 3 * 3 * 1;

a = 3, b = 4

return 3 * 3 * 3 * 3 * 1;

a = 3, b = 5

return 3 * 3 * 3 * 3 * 3 * 1;

a = 3, b = 6

return 3 * 3 * 3 * 3 * 3 * 3 * 1;

a = 3, b = 7

return 3 * 3 * 3 * 3 * 3 * 3 * 3 * 1;

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