0

There is a Microsoft Docs example which shows how to use a BackgroundWorker. And in the sample code is this comment, followed by an access to the BackgroundWorker via a sender parameter:

// Do not access the form's BackgroundWorker reference directly.
// Instead, use the reference provided by the sender parameter.
BackgroundWorker bw = sender as BackgroundWorker;

What error or behavior is being avoided here? And is this always necessary? For example, if I have a background worker that I create apart from a form, will this still be a good practice?

Full example from the link reproduced here for convenience:

using System;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Threading;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace BackgroundWorkerExample
{
    public class Form1 : Form
    {
        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        private void backgroundWorker1_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
        {
            // Do not access the form's BackgroundWorker reference directly.
            // Instead, use the reference provided by the sender parameter.
            BackgroundWorker bw = sender as BackgroundWorker;

            // Extract the argument.
            int arg = (int)e.Argument;

            // Start the time-consuming operation.
            e.Result = TimeConsumingOperation(bw, arg);

            // If the operation was canceled by the user, 
            // set the DoWorkEventArgs.Cancel property to true.
            if (bw.CancellationPending)
            {
                e.Cancel = true;
            }
        }

        // This event handler demonstrates how to interpret 
        // the outcome of the asynchronous operation implemented
        // in the DoWork event handler.
        private void backgroundWorker1_RunWorkerCompleted(
            object sender, 
            RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
        {   
            if (e.Cancelled)
            {
                // The user canceled the operation.
                MessageBox.Show("Operation was canceled");
            }
            else if (e.Error != null)
            {
                // There was an error during the operation.
                string msg = String.Format("An error occurred: {0}", e.Error.Message);
                MessageBox.Show(msg);
            }
            else
            {
                // The operation completed normally.
                string msg = String.Format("Result = {0}", e.Result);
                MessageBox.Show(msg);
            }
        }

        // This method models an operation that may take a long time 
        // to run. It can be cancelled, it can raise an exception,
        // or it can exit normally and return a result. These outcomes
        // are chosen randomly.
        private int TimeConsumingOperation( 
            BackgroundWorker bw, 
            int sleepPeriod )
        {
            int result = 0;

            Random rand = new Random();

            while (!bw.CancellationPending)
            {
                bool exit = false;

                switch (rand.Next(3))
                {
                    // Raise an exception.
                    case 0:
                    {
                        throw new Exception("An error condition occurred.");
                        break;
                    }

                    // Sleep for the number of milliseconds
                    // specified by the sleepPeriod parameter.
                    case 1:
                    {
                        Thread.Sleep(sleepPeriod);
                        break;
                    }

                    // Exit and return normally.
                    case 2:
                    {
                        result = 23;
                        exit = true;
                        break;
                    }

                    default:
                    {
                        break;
                    }
                }

                if( exit )
                {
                    break;
                }
            }

            return result;
        }

        private void startBtn_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            this.backgroundWorker1.RunWorkerAsync(2000);
        }

        private void cancelBtn_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            this.backgroundWorker1.CancelAsync();
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Required designer variable.
        /// </summary>
        private System.ComponentModel.IContainer components = null;

        /// <summary>
        /// Clean up any resources being used.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="disposing">true if managed resources should be disposed; otherwise, false.</param>
        protected override void Dispose(bool disposing)
        {
            if (disposing && (components != null))
            {
                components.Dispose();
            }
            base.Dispose(disposing);
        }

        #region Windows Form Designer generated code

        /// <summary>
        /// Required method for Designer support - do not modify
        /// the contents of this method with the code editor.
        /// </summary>
        private void InitializeComponent()
        {
            this.backgroundWorker1 = new System.ComponentModel.BackgroundWorker();
            this.startBtn = new System.Windows.Forms.Button();
            this.cancelBtn = new System.Windows.Forms.Button();
            this.SuspendLayout();
            // 
            // backgroundWorker1
            // 
            this.backgroundWorker1.WorkerSupportsCancellation = true;
            this.backgroundWorker1.DoWork += new System.ComponentModel.DoWorkEventHandler(this.backgroundWorker1_DoWork);
            this.backgroundWorker1.RunWorkerCompleted += new System.ComponentModel.RunWorkerCompletedEventHandler(this.backgroundWorker1_RunWorkerCompleted);
            // 
            // startBtn
            // 
            this.startBtn.Location = new System.Drawing.Point(12, 12);
            this.startBtn.Name = "startBtn";
            this.startBtn.Size = new System.Drawing.Size(75, 23);
            this.startBtn.TabIndex = 0;
            this.startBtn.Text = "Start";
            this.startBtn.Click += new System.EventHandler(this.startBtn_Click);
            // 
            // cancelBtn
            // 
            this.cancelBtn.Location = new System.Drawing.Point(94, 11);
            this.cancelBtn.Name = "cancelBtn";
            this.cancelBtn.Size = new System.Drawing.Size(75, 23);
            this.cancelBtn.TabIndex = 1;
            this.cancelBtn.Text = "Cancel";
            this.cancelBtn.Click += new System.EventHandler(this.cancelBtn_Click);
            // 
            // Form1
            // 
            this.AutoScaleDimensions = new System.Drawing.SizeF(6F, 13F);
            this.AutoScaleMode = System.Windows.Forms.AutoScaleMode.Font;
            this.ClientSize = new System.Drawing.Size(183, 49);
            this.Controls.Add(this.cancelBtn);
            this.Controls.Add(this.startBtn);
            this.Name = "Form1";
            this.Text = "Form1";
            this.ResumeLayout(false);

        }

        #endregion

        private System.ComponentModel.BackgroundWorker backgroundWorker1;
        private System.Windows.Forms.Button startBtn;
        private System.Windows.Forms.Button cancelBtn;
    }

    public class Program
    {
        private Program()
        {
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// The main entry point for the application.
        /// </summary>
        [STAThread]
        static void Main()
        {
            Application.EnableVisualStyles();
            Application.Run(new Form1());
        }
    }
}
  • Not an answer to your question about the purpose of sender as BackgroundWorker, but I would consider using the async/await pattern for asynchronous programming and/or maintaining UI responsiveness. To me, using async/await is a lot more intuitive and much less work than creating BackgroundWorkers whenever you have an IO or CPU-intensive operation. – Patrick Tucci Feb 1 at 15:52
  • So it's a best practice related to winforms events in general, and does not explicitly avoid an error? If you add that as an answer I'll accept it :) – adamj537 Feb 1 at 16:19
  • 1
    The reference is to any object being sent to an event. In this case "sender as BackgroundWorker". You could access properties A backgroundworker is a separate process from the main thread. You could access the background worker using this.backgroundWorker1 (instead of sender), but that would create a cross-threaded situation. With a form and a background worker you have two asynchronous processes that would be linked. – jdweng Feb 1 at 16:42
  • It is (hopefully) a minor improvement, but if you decide to refactor the code then you have one less thing to edit. Also note that the snippet does not require the worker code and event handlers to be members of the form class, moving it elsewhere is desirable and that got to be a lot easier. The previous comment is nonsense. – Hans Passant Feb 1 at 17:32
  • 1
    @Hans Passant Can you clarify the nonsense part in the previous comment. – Jimi Feb 1 at 18:11
1

As @Hans Passant pointed out, sender and this.backgroundworker1 both reference the same object, and so do the same thing in the example. The reason for the warning is so if a future developer edits the backgroundWorker1_DoWork method to provide a different sender, sender will still work as intended, while this.backgroundworker1 might be accessing a backgroundworker which is no longer related to the method.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.