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I am using Entity Framework Core 2.2 to manage a SQL Server database of traded currencies. There are two entities in the model. The first is Currency, which specifies a trade-able currency, and the other is CurrencyPair, which specifies a pair of currencies that can be exchanged for one another.

public class Currency
{
    public ulong Id { get; set; }
    public string Name {get; set; }

    [NotMapped]
    public IEnumerable<CurrencyPair> Pairs
    {
        get { PairsAsBase?.Concat( PairsAsQuote ?? new CurrencyPair[0] ); }
    }

    public virtual IEnumerable<CurrencyPair> PairsAsBase { get; set; }
    public virtual IEnumerable<CurrencyPair> PairsAsQuote { get; set; }
}

public class CurrencyPair
{
    public ulong Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public ulong BaseCurrencyId { get; set; }
    public ulong QuoteCurrencyId { get; set; }

    public virtual Currency BaseCurrency { get; set; }
    public virtual Currency QuoteCurrency { get; set; }
}

I would like to constrain the CurrencyPair table to disallow rows from having the same Currency for both BaseCurrency and QuoteCurrency fields. That is, if a specific currency has Id = 1, then a currency pair specifying BaseCurrencyId = 1 and QuoteCurrencyId = 1 would not be allowed.

Here is my DbContext.OnModelCreating implementation:

protected override void OnModelCreating( ModelBuilder modelBuilder )
{
    modelBuilder.Entity<Currency>().HasKey(x => x.Id);
    modelBuilder.Entity<Currency>().HasAlternateKey(x => x.Name);
    modelBuilder.Entity<Currency>()
                .HasMany(x => x.PairsAsBase)
                .WithOne(x => x.BaseCurrency)
                .HasForeignKey(x => x.BaseCurrencyId);
    modelBuilder.Entity<Currency>()
                .HasMany(x => x.PairsAsQuote)
                .WithOne(x => x.QuoteCurrency)
                .HasForeignKey(x => x.QuoteCurrencyId);

    modelBuilder.Entity<CurrencyPair>().HasKey(x => x.Id);
    modelBuilder.Entity<CurrencyPair>()
                .HasOne(x => x.BaseCurrency)
                .WithMany(x => x.PairsAsBase)
                .HasForeignKey(x => x.BaseCurrencyId);
    modelBuilder.Entity<CurrencyPair>()
                .HasOne(x => x.QuoteCurrency)
                .WithMany(x => x.PairsAsQuote)
                .HasForeignKey(x => x.QuoteCurrencyId);
}

TL;DR: How can I ensure that two foreign key columns in a table do not both reference the same entity (using Entity Framework Core 2.2)?

  • 2
    I would say that there is no really good way to do this. You can use something like triggers to restrict it, but I personally wouldn't do this. Did you consider just validating this data before it comes to your database? – Yeldar Kurmangaliyev Feb 1 '19 at 17:05
  • 1
    validation client side and check constraint in the DB. which RDBMS? – Moho Feb 1 '19 at 17:09
  • This is trivial to do with a simple CHECK constraint on the database. Something along the lines of this will do: ALTER TABLE CurrencyPair ADD CONSTRAINT CK_CurrencyPair_DifferentCurrencies CHECK (BaseCurrency <> QuoteCurrency) ; – Alejandro Feb 1 '19 at 17:10
1

AFAIK there is no good way to enforce your rule at the model builder lvl. The next best thing would be to intercept SQL commands that could generate faulty data through an ef context, but the API isnt mature enough to make this an easy option.

In my opinion, the only options that you have left have no relation whatsoever to EF:

  • Constrain: Enforce the rule on your DB schema, eg. through a CHECK constraint
  • Validate: Enforce the rule at domain model level, eg. by intercepting the setters for both properties in the class and validating their values.
| improve this answer | |
1

Did you try Global query filters, this should help you protect some unwanted to be show up when you query

modelBuilder.Entity<CurrencyPair>().HasQueryFilter(p => p.BaseCurrency != p.QuoteCurrency);

Data will still store in your table but it not show up when you using it.

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