367

Consider:

http://example.com/page.html?returnurl=%2Fadmin

For js within page.html, how can it retrieve GET parameters?

For the above simple example, func('returnurl') should be /admin.

But it should also work for complex query strings...

17 Answers 17

403

With the window.location object. This code gives you GET without the question mark.

window.location.search.substr(1)

From your example it will return returnurl=%2Fadmin

EDIT: I took the liberty of changing Qwerty's answer, which is really good, and as he pointed I followed exactly what the OP asked:

function findGetParameter(parameterName) {
    var result = null,
        tmp = [];
    location.search
        .substr(1)
        .split("&")
        .forEach(function (item) {
          tmp = item.split("=");
          if (tmp[0] === parameterName) result = decodeURIComponent(tmp[1]);
        });
    return result;
}

I removed the duplicated function execution from his code, replacing it a variable ( tmp ) and also I've added decodeURIComponent, exactly as OP asked. I'm not sure if this may or may not be a security issue.

Or otherwise with plain for loop, which will work even in IE8:

function findGetParameter(parameterName) {
    var result = null,
        tmp = [];
    var items = location.search.substr(1).split("&");
    for (var index = 0; index < items.length; index++) {
        tmp = items[index].split("=");
        if (tmp[0] === parameterName) result = decodeURIComponent(tmp[1]);
    }
    return result;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    It should also work for complex query strings... – compile-fan Mar 27 '11 at 10:20
  • 1
    It will return all of the get query regardless of the size, but it will be one loooong string. – Bakudan Mar 27 '11 at 10:25
  • 3
    This answer is completely wrong by both question definition and implementation. So if you are going to return the whole querystring anyways, which is not what the asker asked, you should use location.search.substr(1) at least. – Qwerty Jun 19 '14 at 10:47
  • 1
    I like it. I like the plain for version too. Changed my downvote. Anyway, the reason why I suggested substr, substring or slice (1) is because there is unnecessary task of reading and searching the ? in replace(). – Qwerty Jul 3 '14 at 9:24
  • 1
    @Qwerty I changed to substring - there might be a question mark inside the query string ( even escaped - %3F ) – Bakudan Jul 3 '14 at 9:37
272

window.location.search will return everything from the ? on. This code below will remove the ?, use split to separate into key/value arrays, then assign named properties to the params object:

function getSearchParameters() {
    var prmstr = window.location.search.substr(1);
    return prmstr != null && prmstr != "" ? transformToAssocArray(prmstr) : {};
}

function transformToAssocArray( prmstr ) {
    var params = {};
    var prmarr = prmstr.split("&");
    for ( var i = 0; i < prmarr.length; i++) {
        var tmparr = prmarr[i].split("=");
        params[tmparr[0]] = tmparr[1];
    }
    return params;
}

var params = getSearchParameters();

You can then get the test parameter from http://myurl.com/?test=1 by calling params.test.

| improve this answer | |
  • 6
    @Bakudan for...in is when you are working with objects. With arrays the for loop is preferred, see this question on for...in with arrays – Charles Sprayberry Nov 16 '12 at 14:35
  • It doesn't hurt much, but point taken. For reasons that are explained here: programmers.stackexchange.com/a/120362 , though, I won't return null, but the empty {} Object. – weltraumpirat Jan 12 '14 at 13:06
  • Maybe you should make this a function and insert: if (prmstr == "") { return null; } at line 2. Otherwise if there's no '?' in the URL you end up with a 'params' set to Object {: undefined}, which is weird. – dcoz Jan 13 '14 at 11:01
  • 1
    @weltraumpirat, I was actually on my way to edit my comment to suggest returning {} instead and I didn't see your reply. In any case thanks for updating your code :) – dcoz Jan 13 '14 at 11:05
  • I have adapted your wonderful code to allow for situations like ?q=abc&g[]=1&g[]=2 to become an assoc array with 2 params: q & g where g is an Array with 2 values. gist.github.com/simkimsia/11372570 – Kim Stacks Apr 28 '14 at 13:46
145

tl;dr solution on a single line of code using vanilla JavaScript

var queryDict = {}
location.search.substr(1).split("&").forEach(function(item) {queryDict[item.split("=")[0]] = item.split("=")[1]})

This is the simplest solution. It unfortunately does not handle multi-valued keys and encoded characters.

"?a=1&a=%2Fadmin&b=2&c=3&d&e"
> queryDict
a: "%2Fadmin"  // Overridden with the last value, not decoded.
b: "2"
c: "3"
d: undefined
e: undefined

Multi-valued keys and encoded characters?

See the original answer at How can I get query string values in JavaScript?.

"?a=1&b=2&c=3&d&e&a=5&a=t%20e%20x%20t&e=http%3A%2F%2Fw3schools.com%2Fmy%20test.asp%3Fname%3Dståle%26car%3Dsaab&a=%2Fadmin"
> queryDict
a: ["1", "5", "t e x t", "/admin"]
b: ["2"]
c: ["3"]
d: [undefined]
e: [undefined, "http://w3schools.com/my test.asp?name=ståle&car=saab"]

In your example, you would access the value like this:

"?returnurl=%2Fadmin"
> qd.returnurl    // ["/admin"]
> qd['returnurl'] // ["/admin"]
> qd.returnurl[0] // "/admin"
| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    Seems to be the best answer here. – Naveed Hasan Jan 29 '14 at 14:33
  • 1
    Thank you for noticing my error. I also took the liberty of modifying your code, removing the second split invocation, which can be replaced with a local variable. – Bakudan Jul 2 '14 at 15:49
  • Short and easy to understand :) – Phuong Feb 2 '16 at 2:51
  • what is vanilla? another js injected? @NaveedHasan – gumuruh Jul 26 '16 at 2:21
  • 1
    @NaveedHasan VanillaJS is a term originating from a joke name for pure javascript without additional libraries. See here. – Qwerty Jul 26 '16 at 10:29
109

You should use URL and URLSearchParams native functions:

let url = new URL("https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8&q=mdn%20query%20string")
let params = new URLSearchParams(url.search);
let sourceid = params.get('sourceid') // 'chrome-instant'
let q = params.get('q') // 'mdn query string'
let ie = params.has('ie') // true
params.append('ping','pong')

console.log(sourceid)
console.log(q)
console.log(ie)
console.log(params.toString())
console.log(params.get("ping"))

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/URLSearchParams https://polyfill.io/v2/docs/features/

| improve this answer | |
  • 9
    Unfortunately this is not compatible with IE :'( – Cyril Duchon-Doris Mar 16 '17 at 10:58
  • 8
    Add the polyfill listed below the code snippet to patch IE and turn that frown upside down. – AKnox Mar 31 '17 at 12:57
  • 7
    @Alexey > because it should be that var params = new URLSearchParams(window.location.search.slice(1)); – Raphaël Gonçalves Mar 20 '18 at 10:22
  • 1
    This doesn't work on iOS Safari, which is a much larger market share than IE is. – Xeoncross Oct 3 '18 at 19:05
  • 2
    This is strongest answer without using invented functions and tons of codes – Alexey Khachatryan Mar 27 at 2:21
38

A more fancy way to do it: :)

var options = window.location.search.slice(1)
                      .split('&')
                      .reduce(function _reduce (/*Object*/ a, /*String*/ b) {
                        b = b.split('=');
                        a[b[0]] = decodeURIComponent(b[1]);
                        return a;
                      }, {});
| improve this answer | |
  • 10
    Fancy indeed, but watch out reduce is not compatible with all browsers. More info here : stackoverflow.com/questions/7094935/ie-js-reduce-on-an-object – fe_lix_ Nov 27 '12 at 10:40
  • Notably it's not supported in IE8 – Ian Clark Jan 3 '14 at 16:35
  • If there is an url as a parameter, the decodeURIComponent will mistakenly resolve it as another &key=val pairs. – Qwerty Nov 14 '14 at 14:37
  • As Qwerty has pointed out: decodeURIComponent should be moved inside: a[b[0]] = decodeURIComponent(b[1]) – Peter T. Aug 18 '16 at 10:07
  • thanks for that! edited – Stefan Aug 18 '16 at 18:10
10

I do it like this (to retrieve a specific get-parameter, here 'parameterName'):

var parameterValue = decodeURIComponent(window.location.search.match(/(\?|&)parameterName\=([^&]*)/)[2]);
| improve this answer | |
  • This is nice and short. I also prefer to do that in my code. – Michael Yagudaev Jan 16 '16 at 22:25
  • This is nice and works, but generates an error when the parameter is omitted... You can fix it by storing the match in a variable and checking if it equals null, but that ruins the one-line nature :/ – rinogo Feb 4 '16 at 23:47
8

This one uses a regular expression and returns null if the parameter doesn't exist or doesn't have any value:

function getQuery(q) {
   return (window.location.search.match(new RegExp('[?&]' + q + '=([^&]+)')) || [, null])[1];
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Yes thanks this is what i needed :) – taggartJ Aug 22 '19 at 2:26
  • Gets the job done perfectly. Thank you! – Ivan Apr 18 at 15:19
7

Here I've made this code to transform the GET parameters into an object to use them more easily.

// Get Nav URL
function getNavUrl() {
    // Get URL
    return window.location.search.replace("?", "");
};

function getParameters(url) {
    // Params obj
    var params = {};
    // To lowercase
    url = url.toLowerCase();
    // To array
    url = url.split('&');

    // Iterate over URL parameters array
    var length = url.length;
    for(var i=0; i<length; i++) {
        // Create prop
        var prop = url[i].slice(0, url[i].search('='));
        // Create Val
        var value = url[i].slice(url[i].search('=')).replace('=', '');
        // Params New Attr
        params[prop] = value;
    }
    return params;
};

// Call of getParameters
console.log(getParameters(getNavUrl()));
| improve this answer | |
3
var getQueryParam = function(param) {
    var found;
    window.location.search.substr(1).split("&").forEach(function(item) {
        if (param ==  item.split("=")[0]) {
            found = item.split("=")[1];
        }
    });
    return found;
};
| improve this answer | |
2

If you don't mind using a library instead of rolling your own implementation, check out https://github.com/jgallen23/querystring.

| improve this answer | |
2

This solution handles URL decoding:

var params = function() {
    function urldecode(str) {
        return decodeURIComponent((str+'').replace(/\+/g, '%20'));
    }

    function transformToAssocArray( prmstr ) {
        var params = {};
        var prmarr = prmstr.split("&");
        for ( var i = 0; i < prmarr.length; i++) {
            var tmparr = prmarr[i].split("=");
            params[tmparr[0]] = urldecode(tmparr[1]);
        }
        return params;
    }

    var prmstr = window.location.search.substr(1);
    return prmstr != null && prmstr != "" ? transformToAssocArray(prmstr) : {};
}();

Usage:

console.log('someParam GET value is', params['someParam']);
| improve this answer | |
2

I have created a simple JavaScript function to access GET parameters from URL.

Just include this JavaScript source and you can access get parameters. E.g.: in http://example.com/index.php?language=french, the language variable can be accessed as $_GET["language"]. Similarly, a list of all parameters will be stored in a variable $_GET_Params as an array. Both the JavaScript and HTML are provided in the following code snippet:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
  <body>
    <!-- This script is required -->
    <script>
    function $_GET() {
      // Get the Full href of the page e.g. http://www.google.com/files/script.php?v=1.8.7&country=india
      var href = window.location.href;

      // Get the protocol e.g. http
      var protocol = window.location.protocol + "//";

      // Get the host name e.g. www.google.com
      var hostname = window.location.hostname;

      // Get the pathname e.g. /files/script.php
      var pathname = window.location.pathname;

      // Remove protocol part
      var queries = href.replace(protocol, '');

      // Remove host part
      queries = queries.replace(hostname, '');

      // Remove pathname part
      queries = queries.replace(pathname, '');

      // Presently, what is left in the variable queries is : ?v=1.8.7&country=india

      // Perform query functions if present
      if (queries != "" && queries != "?") {

    // Remove question mark '?'
        queries = queries.slice(1);

        // Split all the different queries
        queries = queries.split("&");

        // Get the number of queries
        var length = queries.length;

        // Declare global variables to store keys and elements
        $_GET_Params = new Array();
        $_GET = {};

        // Perform functions per query
        for (var i  = 0; i < length; i++) {

          // Get the present query
          var key = queries[i];

          // Split the query and the value
          key = key.split("=");

          // Assign value to the $_GET variable
          $_GET[key[0]] = [key[1]];

          // Assign value to the $_GET_Params variable
          $_GET_Params[i] = key[0];
        }
      }
    }

    // Execute the function
    $_GET();
    </script>
    <h1>GET Parameters</h1>
    <h2>Try to insert some get parameter and access it through JavaScript</h2>
  </body>
</html>

| improve this answer | |
2

Here is another example based on Kat's and Bakudan's examples, but making it a just a bit more generic.

function getParams ()
{
    var result = {};
    var tmp = [];

    location.search
        .substr (1)
        .split ("&")
        .forEach (function (item)
        {
            tmp = item.split ("=");
            result [tmp[0]] = decodeURIComponent (tmp[1]);
        });

    return result;
}

location.getParams = getParams;

console.log (location.getParams());
console.log (location.getParams()["returnurl"]);
| improve this answer | |
  • There isn't an answer or comment by the user name "Kat". User names can change at any time. What does it refer to? – Peter Mortensen Oct 8 at 21:31
1

To get the parameters as a JSON object:

alert(getUrlParameters().toSource())

function explode(delim, str)
{
    return str.split(delim);
}

function getUrlParameters()
{
    var out = {};
    var str = window.location.search.replace("?", "");
    var subs = explode('&', str);
    for(var i = 0; i < subs.length; ++i)
    {
        var vals = explode('=', subs[i]);
        out[vals[0]] = vals[1];
    }
    return out;
}
| improve this answer | |
1

My solution expands on @tak3r's.

It returns an empty object when there are no query parameters and supports the array notation ?a=1&a=2&a=3:

function getQueryParams () {
  function identity (e) { return e; }
  function toKeyValue (params, param) {
    var keyValue = param.split('=');
    var key = keyValue[0], value = keyValue[1];

    params[key] = params[key]?[value].concat(params[key]):value;
    return params;
  }
  return decodeURIComponent(window.location.search).
    replace(/^\?/, '').split('&').
    filter(identity).
    reduce(toKeyValue, {});
}
| improve this answer | |
  • There isn't currently any answer or comment with user name "tak3r" (user names can change at any time). What does it refer to? – Peter Mortensen Oct 8 at 21:13
0

You can use the search function available in the location object. The search function gives the parameter part of the URL. Details can be found in Location Object.

You will have to parse the resulting string for getting the variables and their values, e.g. splitting them on '='.

| improve this answer | |
0

If you are using AngularJS, you can use $routeParams using ngRoute module

You have to add a module to your app

angular.module('myApp', ['ngRoute'])

Now you can use service $routeParams:

.controller('AppCtrl', function($routeParams) {
  console.log($routeParams); // JSON object
}
| improve this answer | |

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