2

Consider the following code example:

from enum import Enum

class Location(Enum):
    Outside = 'outside'
    Inside = 'inside' 
    class Inside(Enum): # TypeError for conflicting names
        Downstairs = 'downstairs'
        Upstairs = 'upstairs'

How do I make Inside have the value 'inside' whilst also being a nested enum for accessing Downstairs and Upstairs?

Desired input:

print(Location.Inside)
print(Location.Inside.value)
print(Location.Inside.Downstairs)
print(Location.Inside.Downstairs.value)

Desired output:

Location.Inside
inside
Location.Inside.Downstairs
downstairs

UPDATE 1:

Some more context to my specific problem:

class Location(Enum):
    Outside = 'outside'
    Inside = 'inside' 
    class Inside(Enum): # TypeError for conflicting names
        Downstairs = 'downstairs'
        Upstairs = 'upstairs'

class Human:
    def __init__(self, location):
        self.location = location

def getLocationFromAPI():
    # this function returns either 'inside' or 'outside'
    # make calls to external API  
    return location # return location from api in str

def whereInside(human):
    if human.location != Location.Inside:
        return None
    # here goes logic that determines if human is downstairs or upstairs
    return locationInside # return either Location.Downstairs or Location.Upstairs


location_str = getLocationFromAPI() # will return 'inside' or 'outside'
location = Location(location_str) # make Enum
human = Human(location) # create human with basic location
if human.location == Location.Inside:
    where_inside = whereInside(human)
    human.location = where_inside # update location to be more precise

The problem is when I create the Human object I only know of a basic location, as in 'inside' or 'outside'. Only after that can I update the location to be more precise.

  • Enum's can only have one value. – juanpa.arrivillaga Feb 2 at 0:15
  • Are you sure there isn't another class called Inside in your module? Wait forget that.. INDENTATION! the Inside and Outside in the Location class are unindented. Python is a language heavily reliant on good (but simple) code styling. Watch your TABs – Jab Feb 2 at 0:16
  • @juanpa.arrivillaga Aha, thank you. Do you know any other design choice for the code I posted? I think it's quite clear what i'm trying to achieve. – Dr. Alban Feb 2 at 0:21
  • It doesn't make much sense to me, but how about just removing Inside = 'inside' – juanpa.arrivillaga Feb 2 at 0:24
  • @Jaba Wow thanks a lot. I missed it. – Dr. Alban Feb 2 at 0:25
2

You can accomplish this by embedding an enum.Enum inside another like so: (just watch out for names conflicting)

from enum import Enum

class _Inside(Enum):
    Downstairs = 'downstairs'
    Upstairs = 'upstairs'

class Location(Enum):
    Outside = 'outside'
    Inside = _Inside 

print(Location.Inside.value.Downstairs.value)
downstairs
  • This is a lot neater than having a nested solution, however, it doesn't help in my particular design since I won't be able to make use of this: Location('inside') -> Location.Inside – Dr. Alban Feb 2 at 23:19
  • Please be more elaborate as to how you will be using this as this seems to be the best way to answer your question. – Jab Feb 2 at 23:23
  • I updated my question to give more context – Dr. Alban Feb 3 at 0:28
  • I see your edit, why not use named tuples or even a dict here? Seemed as though you could. Also, your error seems to be due to the fact that you are using Inside then making a class called Inside. Just using Named tuples or a dict would potentially circumvent this – Jab Feb 3 at 1:07
-1

You have Outside and Inside unindented but this code is unnessecary. I suggest using a dict As this video explains classes are used far too often for things that can be implemented much more simply.

locations = {'inside': {'downstairs': 'downstairs',
                        'upstairs': 'upstairs'},
             'outside': {'park': 'park'}
            }

This makes much more sense as:

locations['inside']['downstairs']
#downstairs
locations['outside']['park']
#'park'

As the Zen of Python states: "Simple is better than complex."

If it's .dot notation you're really after than maybe look into Box. It's not something used by many but some just really prefer the .dot notation schema.


pip install python-box


from box import Box

loc_box = Box(locations)

loc_box.inside.upstairs
#'upstairs'

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