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I'd like to follow this blog explaining how to configure one-to-one relationship. Its idea is that one entity gets a property of the other's type while the other one gets a property of the former's type plus an ID to it to create a foreign key.

My issue is, though, that I want to brake out the contact part of two different classes like so. The class SomeThing is already refactored and works well with the class Address. However, I'm not sure how to deal with the class SomeThingElse.

public class SomeThing
{
  public Guid Id { get; set; }
  //public string Street { get; set; }
  //public string City { get; set; }
  public Address Address { get; set; }
}

public class Address
{
  public Guid Id { get; set; }
  public string Street { get; set; }
  public string City { get; set; }
  public Guid SomeThingId { get; set; }
  public SomeThing SomeThing { get; set; }  
}

public class SomeThingElse
{
  public Guid Id { get; set; }
  public string Street { get; set; }
  public string City { get; set; }
  //public Address Address { get; set; }
}

I've tried adding a specialized class for managing the address of SomeThingElse but then, it makes no sense to break it out. I considered adding the two fields below but rejected the idea as poor design for the DB.

public class Address
{
  ...
  public Guid SomeThingElseId { get; set; }
  public SomeThingElse SomeThingElse { get; set; }  
}

Preferably, this is a school book case for inheritance introducing a base class Contactable and skipping Address altogether. But I recall from before that inheritance and EF don't mix well and that there's a lot of oopsies and gotchas to be expected in such case.

Is there a reliable best-practice for doing that? I haven't found anything that felt trustable enough when I googled.

10
  • Little confused about what's being asked. So you want another 1:1 relationship between Address and SomethingElse? – pingOfDoom Feb 2 '19 at 14:30
  • I already have a relationship between SomeThing and Address. Now I want to also have a relationship between SomethingElse and Address. Both classes (SomeThing and SomeThingElse) have the contact information in them, which I intend to pull out to a separate class (i.e. Address). E.g. a student has an address but the school also has an address. Or, perhaps, an employee has a phone number but the company also has a phone number (where phone number can be a complex class containing all kinds of contact means as Skype, email and what not). – DonkeyBanana Feb 2 '19 at 14:47
  • @DonkeyBanana I see you are putting wrong navigation property in Address. It should be public SomeThingElse SomeThingElse { get; set; } instead of public SomeThing SomeThingElse { get; set; } – TanvirArjel Feb 2 '19 at 15:47
  • @DonkeyBanana Between the Address and SomeThingElse which is Principal entity and which is dependent entity? Would you make it clear please? – TanvirArjel Feb 2 '19 at 15:56
  • 1
    To get you on the right track I suggest you read Bill Karwin's classic Sql Anti Patterns, in particular the part on polymorphic associations. That will help you make an educated decision on how to implement this. – Gert Arnold Feb 2 '19 at 16:37
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As from the discussion in the comments, I am going into a details answer:

You can use EF Core newly introduced Owned Entity type feature where Address is the Owned Entity type of Something and SomethingElse while Something and SomethingElse are the owners as follows:

modelBuilder.Entity<SomeThing>().OwnsOne(st => st.Address);
modelBuilder.Entity<SomeThingElse>().OwnsOne(st => st.Address);

By convention, EF Core will name the database columns for the properties of the owned entity type following the pattern Navigation_OwnedEntityProperty. Therefore the Address properties will appear in the Something and SomethingElse table with the names 'Address_Street' and 'Address_City'.

Now if you don't want owned entity type column name to be like Navigation_OwnedEntityProperty then you can give your custom column name as follows:

modelBuilder.Entity<SomeThing>().OwnsOne(st => st.Address,
     a =>
     {
          a.Property(p => p.Street).HasColumnName("Street");
          a.Property(p => p.City).HasColumnName("City");
     });

modelBuilder.Entity<SomeThingElse>().OwnsOne(ste => ste.Address,
     a =>
     {
          a.Property(p => p.Street).HasColumnName("Street");
          a.Property(p => p.City).HasColumnName("City");
     });

Moreover owned types can be stored in a separate table from the owner. In order to override the convention that maps an owned type to the same table as the owner, you can simply call ToTable and provide a different table name as follows:

modelBuilder.Entity<SomeThing>().OwnsOne(st => st.Address,
      a =>
      {
            a.ToTable("SomeThingAddress");
      });

 modelBuilder.Entity<SomeThingElse>().OwnsOne(ste => ste.Address,
      a =>
      {
          a.ToTable("SomeThingElseAddress");
      });

Querying owned types

When querying the owner the owned types will be included by default. It is not necessary to use the Include method, even if the owned types are stored in a separate table.

Limitations

Some of these limitations are fundamental to how owned entity types work, but some others are restrictions that we may be able to remove in future releases:

By-design restrictions:

  • You cannot create a DbSet<T> for an owned type
  • You cannot call Entity<T>() with an owned type on ModelBuilder

For more details: EF Core Owned Entity Types Limitations

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  • This is the way to go. – ssmith Feb 3 '19 at 13:53
  • Oh, this owned entity concept gave me an codegasm! I totally love when I get a comment referring me to some vague part of a book implicating that it's too complicated to resolve here. And then, somebody drops a one-liner and kills the issue. Awesome! I have a follow-up to that. Since the implementation of the concept is fairly new, the templates in VS don't suggest anything special for it when scaffolding. What would your suggestion (or guestimation) be in that regard? If I want to edit my entity, do I just throw in some extra fields for the data in the owned part? – DonkeyBanana Feb 3 '19 at 15:50
  • @DonkeyBanana If I want to edit my entity, do I just throw in some extra fields for the data in the owned part?- Yes! Off course you can update the owned type with owner just updating owned type fields value like you will do for owner. – TanvirArjel Feb 3 '19 at 16:56

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