1

I am trying to see the effects of calling virtual destructors of classes belonging to a long chain of hierarchy: class A to class E.

Strangely, the destructors do not write anything to the console. I first thought perhaps it was happening because main was exiting too. So, I put all the testing code within a function called test() and invoked from within main() so when test would return, I would see destructor footprints. But, nothing! No "cout" signs on the console show up!

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

//A constructor cannot be virtual but a destructor can.
class A {
public:
A() {
    cout << "A constructor" << endl;
}
virtual ~A() {cout << "A destructor" << endl;}
};

class B :public A {
public:
    B() {
    cout << "B constructor" << endl;
    }
    virtual ~B() {cout << "B destructor" << endl;}
};

class C :public B {
public:
    C() {
    cout << "C constructor" << endl;
    }
    virtual ~C() {cout << "C destructor" << endl;}
};

class D :public C {
public:
    D() {
    cout << "D constructor" << endl;
    }
    ~D() {cout << "D destructor" << endl;}
};

class E :public D {
public:
    E() {
     cout << "E constructor" << endl;
      }
     ~E() {cout << "E destructor" << endl;}
};

void test() {
   cout << "Test1 begins..." << endl;
   A* a1 = new D();
   cout << "Test2 begins..." << endl;
   A* a2 = new E();
}

int main() {
 test();
 return 0;
}
2
  • I've rolled back your changes to your question, as you shouldn't incorporate a correct answer in your question, as than the answer no longer makes sense
    – JVApen
    Commented Feb 2, 2019 at 16:40
  • 1
    OK. I combined suggestions from both David and Basile and it worked. I have unique_ptr variables, instead of naked pointers needing new and delete, and also tried one local variable E ee. Commented Feb 2, 2019 at 16:54

2 Answers 2

6

Ummm... you actually leak those.

Every objected created by the new keyword must have an equivilant delete:

void test() {
   cout << "Test1 begins..." << endl;
   A* a1 = new D();
   cout << "Test2 begins..." << endl;
   A* a2 = new E();
   delete a1;
   delete a2;
}

Developers (just in your case) always forgot to delete dynamically allocated objects, so smart pointers were introduce:

void test() {
   cout << "Test1 begins..." << endl;
   std::unique_ptr<A> a1(new D());
   cout << "Test2 begins..." << endl;
   std::unique_ptr<A> a2(new E());
}

no need to worry about a leak, as unique_ptr automatically delete their pointee when they get out of scope.

3

You never delete your raw pointers. Prefer smart pointers to raw ones.

You should add

delete a1;
delete a2;

near the end of your test.

Try also to create some instances of E as an automatic variable (usually on the call stack). For example, insert

E ee;

in between those two delete-s.

6
  • Ohhh! How did I miss that!! I should have used the unique_prt smart pointer! Thanks. Commented Feb 2, 2019 at 16:02
  • Then you probably should accept my answer (green tick on the left). Commented Feb 2, 2019 at 16:03
  • The answer is still freshly baked and smoke is still coming out. I need to wait 9 more minutes. Commented Feb 2, 2019 at 16:04
  • Thanks to both of you. Commented Feb 2, 2019 at 16:11
  • @softwarelover Still, you need to pick one to mark your problem as solved. If the two answers are equally good in your opinion, pick the one that was posted earlier (this one). Commented Feb 2, 2019 at 16:43

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