15

I have an array of strings, sort of like this:

["x", "foo", "y", "bar", "baz", "z", "0"]

And I need to split the array for every X, Y, and Z or other special keywords there are.

I've tried to split arrays with [x,y,z].split(y), but I'm pretty sure split() is only for strings.

The keywords (x, y, and z) have to be the first ones in the array. How can I do this?

This is what I'm trying to get:

[
    ["x", "foo"],
    ["y", "bar", "baz"],
    ["z", "0"]
]
4
  • 2
    do you have a set of keys, or an array which order is important? Commented Feb 2, 2019 at 16:57
  • 1
    @DexieTheSheep Is the order of array important(x,y,z) important?
    – Maheer Ali
    Commented Feb 2, 2019 at 17:04
  • The order is important. This is used for an interpreter for a language that I'm working on, so it usually matters which order you type stuff in. Commented Feb 2, 2019 at 17:10
  • 2
    Is there a particular reason why you're writing your own lexer? It's probably the least interesting part of most languages, so you might want to just use one that's already available. Commented Feb 2, 2019 at 22:30

10 Answers 10

11

You could take an array and a closure over the index for the key strings and push an empty array if a key is found.

var array = ["x", "foo", "y", "bar", "baz", "z", "0"],
    keys = ["x", "y", "z"],
    result = array.reduce((i => (r, s) => {
        if (s === keys[i]) {
            r.push([]);
            i++;
        }
        r[r.length - 1].push(s);
        return r;
    })(0), []);

console.log(result);
.as-console-wrapper { max-height: 100% !important; top: 0; }

3
  • 3
    I didn't think the OP needs the keys to appear in order, do they? And even if they did, the closure is horribly confusing. Either put the i variable in the outer scope, or if you like functional programming, thread it through in the accumulator.
    – Bergi
    Commented Feb 2, 2019 at 20:37
  • @Bergi, op needs the keys in order, as one comment shows. Commented Feb 2, 2019 at 20:43
  • 2
    I thought that was referring to the order of the result array, i.e. that the property concat(result) == input holds.
    – Bergi
    Commented Feb 2, 2019 at 20:48
6
 const keywords = new Set(["x", "y", "z"]);

 let acc = [];
 const result = [];

 for(const el of array) {
   if(keywords.has(el)) {
     result.push(acc = [el]);
   } else acc.push(el);
 }
3

I'm too late, but I will show a totally different approach from other answers. In this approach the input array is converted to string using join() and the result is obtained using, mainly, regular expressions with the split() method:

const input = ["x", "foo", "y", "bar", "baz", "z", "0"];
const keyRegex = /(?=#x#)|(?=#y#)|(?=#z#)/;

let res = ("#" + input.join("#") + "#")          // #x#foo#y#bar#baz#z#0#"
    .split(keyRegex)                             // [#x#foo, #y#bar#baz, #z#0#]
    .map(str => str.split("#").filter(Boolean));

console.log(JSON.stringify(res));

And here is another approach using map() over an array with the keys. Note I have passed a copy of input array to the map method and I used it as the this argument. Also, I'm using splice() over this to remove the already analyzed section and perform futures findIndex() over a shortened array. However, none of this things can be better than a solution with reduce() or a standard loop over the input array.

const input = ["x", "foo", "y", "bar", "baz", "z", "0"];
const keys = ["x", "y", "z"];

let res = keys.map(function(k, i)
{
    let a = this.findIndex(x => x === k);
    let b = this.findIndex(x => x === keys[i+1]);
    return this.splice(a, b >= 0 ? b : this.length);
}, input.slice());

console.log(JSON.stringify(res));

2

Just another way to do it. You could use slice:

var a = ["x", "foo", "y", "bar", "baz", "z", "0"];
var breakpoints = ['x', 'y', 'z'];
var res = [];
for(var i = 0; i < breakpoints.length - 1; i++) {
  res = res.concat([a.slice(a.indexOf(breakpoints[i]), a.indexOf(breakpoints[i+1]))]);
}
res = res.concat([a.slice(a.indexOf(breakpoints[i]))]);
console.log(res);

1

Just a short alternative to the good answers that were already posted, if that can help.

This is using Array.reduce:

const input = ['x', 'foo', 'y', 'bar', 'baz', 'z', '0'];
const keywords = ['x', 'y', 'z'];

const result = input.reduce((result, value) => {
  keywords.includes(value) ? result.push([value]) : result[result.length - 1].push(value);
  return result;
}, []);

console.log(result);

Note that it will fail if the first item in the input array isn't a keyword (which it shouldn't be). You can easily change the condition to keywords.includes(value) || keywords.length === 0 otherwise.

1

Using a double reduce is possible on the first stage compute the indexes of each key and on the second reduce split the array:

var arr = ["x", "foo", "y", "bar", "baz", "z", "0"];
var keys = keys = ["x", "y", "z"];

var retVal = arr.reduce(function(acc, ele, idx) {
    if (keys.indexOf(ele) > -1) {
        acc.push(idx);
    }
    return acc;
}, []).reduce(function(acc, ele, idx, a) {
    acc.push(arr.slice(ele, a[idx+1]));
    return acc;
}, []);

console.log(retVal);

1

You can use slice to extract the individual array by the index of the given keys and push it into the final array.

const arr = ["x", "foo", "y", "bar", "baz", "z", "0"];
function splitByKeys(...keys){
let splitarr = [];
  for(let i =0; i<keys.length;i++){
   if(i == keys.length -1 ){
     splitarr.push(arr.slice( arr.indexOf(keys[i]) , arr.length));
   }else{
    splitarr.push(arr.slice( arr.indexOf(keys[i]) , arr.indexOf(keys[i+1])));
   }
  }
  return splitarr;
}
console.log(splitByKeys("x", "y", "z"));

1

You can do that by this code:

function separator(a) {
  var result = [];

  for (var i = 0; i < a.length; i++) {
    var index = a[i].trim().toLowerCase();

    switch (index) {
      case "x":
      case "y":
      case "z":
        if (result[index] == undefined) {
          result.push([index]);
        }
        break;

      default:
        result[result.length - 1].push(a[i]);
    }
  }

  return result;
}

// Sample:
var arr = ["x", "foo", "y", "bar", "baz", "z", "0"];
console.log(separator(arr));

// Result must be:
// [["x", "foo"], ["y", "bar", "baz"], ["z", "0"]]

Or use this for grouping:

function separator(a) {
  var result = {};
  var lastIndex = "";

  for (var i = 0; i < a.length; i++) {
    var index = a[i].trim().toLowerCase();

    switch (index) {
      case "x":
      case "y":
      case "z":
        if (result[index] == undefined) {
          result[index] = [];
        }
        lastIndex = index;
        break;

      default:
        result[lastIndex].push(a[i]);
    }
  }

  return result;
}

// Sample:
var arr = ["x", "foo", "y", "bar", "baz", "z", "0"];
console.log(separator(arr));

// Result must be:
// {"x": ["foo"], "y": ["bar", "baz"], "z": ["0"]}

The second code can works on advanced array like this:

["x", "foo", "y", "bar", "x", "baz", "z", "0", "y", "bar2"]

And result is this:
{"x": ["foo", "baz"], "y": ["bar", "bar2"], "z": ["0"]}
1
const input = ['x', 'foo', 'y', 'bar', 'baz', 'z', '0'];
const keywords = ['x', 'y', 'z'];

input.reduce((prev, val) => {
    const split = keywords.includes(val);
    const index = prev.length - Number(!split);
    prev[index] = split ? [val] : prev[index].concat(val)
    return prev;
}, []);

It's a functional way to do the split and avoid undesirable side effects.

1

Pretty simple!

const arr = ["x", "foo", "y", "bar", "baz", "z", "0"];
const specialChar = ['x', 'y', 'z'];
let result = [];

arr.forEach((el, index) => {
  if(specialChar.includes(el)){
    result.push([el, arr[index + 1]])
  }
});

console.log(result)

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