1

Given the following struct:

struct A {
    template<typename T, std::size_t N>
    A(T const(&array)[N]) {}

    template<typename T, std::size_t N>
    A& operator=(T const(&array)[N]) { return *this; }
 };

The code:

// a is of type A
a = {1, 2, 3, 4};

compiles just fine, since std::initialiser_list is implicitly converted to an array reference.

However,

A a {1, 2, 3, 4};
A a = {1, 2, 3, 4};

fails to compile with both Clang and GCC. It does compile when I add a constructor that accepts a std::initialiser_list<T>.

What am I missing?

  • I didn't even think a struct could have constructors and operators. It must be part of some newer standard. Does it work if you use "A a({1, 2, 3, 4});" instead of "A a {1, 2, 3, 4};" ? – Bob Shaffer Feb 3 at 21:24
  • Or also A a{{1, 2, 3, 4}}? – max66 Feb 3 at 21:37
  • @BobShaffer struct and class have been practically synonymous in C++ for very long time (I think even from the start?). I prefer struct to class in most cases since I almost never use traditional OOP in my programs. – MrMobster Feb 3 at 21:37
  • A a ({1, 2, 3, 4}); and A a {{1, 2, 3, 4}}; both work but I am still confused by the asymmetry to the assignment operator. Why is the initialiser list implicitly converted in one case but not in the other? – MrMobster Feb 3 at 21:39
  • @BobShaffer structs could always have constructors. The only difference between class and struct is what the default access is (private vs public) – Barry Feb 3 at 21:50
2

You just need extra braces or parens:

A a{{1, 2, 3, 4}}; // ok
A b({1, 2, 3, 4}); // ok

The reason for this is the outer braces/parens are for the A and in the inner braces are for the array object that you're list-initializing.

With assignment, you don't need the extra parens or braces because they're simply implied by the function call:

a = {1, 2, 3, 4};

is equivalent to:

a.operator=({1, 2, 3, 4});

More or less.


It does compile when I add a constructor that accepts a std::initialiser_list<T>.

To elaborate on how list-initialization works. When you write A a{1, 2, 3, 4}, we're looking first for some std::initializer_list<T> constructor (which we don't have yet, and so don't find one) and then look for a constructor that we can call with four arguments (which doesn't exist). Adding the extra ()s or {}s means we're looking for a constructor that we can call with one argument which we initialize with 1, 2 ,3, 4.

Once you add the std::initializer_list<T> constructor, now that's a viable candidate for that first phase of initialization.


Note that this:

compiles just fine, since std::initialiser_list is implicitly converted to an array reference.

is not right. There is no std::initializer_list anywhere in this question. {1, 2, 3, 4} is a funny thing in C++. It doesn't have a type or anything. It's just a braced-init-list. It's only based on context that we give it meaning. In this case, it's not a thing that's converted to a different thing... it's just a collection of initializers for the array.

  • Thank you for clarifying this. I was totally confused by the relationship between the array and the std::initialiser_list. – MrMobster Feb 3 at 21:50

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