5

NOTE: This is not about using a string for choosing the execution path in a switch-case block.

A common pattern in C++ is to use a switch-case block for converting integer constants to strings. This looks like:

char const * to_string(codes code)
{
    switch (code)
    {
        case codes::foo: return "foo";
        case codes::bar: return "bar";
    }
}

However, we are in C++, so using std::string is more appropriate:

std::string to_string(codes code)
{
    switch (code)
    {
        case codes::foo: return "foo";
        case codes::bar: return "bar";
    }
}

This however copies the string literal. Perhaps a better approach would be instead:

std::string const & to_string(codes code)
{
    switch (code)
    {
        case codes::foo: { static std::string str = "foo"; return str; }
        case codes::bar: { static std::string str = "bar"; return str; }
    }
}

But this is kinda ugly, and involves more boilerplate.

What is considered the cleanest and most efficient solution for this problem using C++14?

  • 3
    A private hashmap with codes as key and string as value? A function to return the value based on the key. – Samer Tufail Feb 4 at 14:25
  • 9
    "we are in C++, so using std::string is more appropriate" Says who? std::string is an owning mutable container, and you're returning an immutable, static value. What's wrong with char const*? In C++17, you have std::string_view, which you can implement for yourself without too much effort – KABoissonneault Feb 4 at 14:25
  • @SamerTufail, thank you for validating me. I do this at work all the time. :) But was always curious if that is a good way to do things. – Duck Dodgers Feb 4 at 14:26
  • 1
    @JoeyMallone stackoverflow.com/questions/931890/… Allow me to "unvalidate" you for some cases :) – UKMonkey Feb 4 at 14:39
  • 2
    Do note that with the last code block, static initialization comes with a performance penalty because it needs to be thread safe and checked every time the function is called. That can out weigh the cost of a copy. – NathanOliver Feb 4 at 15:47
8

This however copies the string literal.

Yes and no. It will copy the string literal indeed, but don't necessarily allocate memory. Check your implementation SSO limit.


You could use std::string_view:

constexpr std::string_view to_string(codes code) {
    switch (code) {
        case codes::foo: return "foo";
        case codes::bar: return "bar";
    }
}

You can find many backported versions like this one

However, sometimes a char const* is the right abstraction. For example, if you were to forward that string into an API that require a null terminated string, you'd be better off returning it a c style string.

  • 1
    This. A string_view has value for sure, but otherwise I'd just stick with the original code. Certainly there's no reason to use a string just because we're writing C++. C++ still has const char*. – Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 4 at 15:12
2

But this is kinda ugly, and involves more boilerplate.

What is considered the cleanest and most efficient solution for this problem using C++14?

To answer the above, as @SamerTufail pointed out (and as I do it myself at work also), I would use enums and std::map like this.

   typedef enum {
        foo = 1,
        bar = 2,
    } Key;

std::map<Key, std::string> hash_map = { {Key::foo ,"foo"}, { Key::bar,"bar"} };

And then in main() you could get the value like this,

std::cout << hash_map.find(Key::foo)->second;

I would create a function for returning the second, where you would check the iterator for end(), otherwise the interator would be invalid and using it would be UB.


EDIT: As others have pointed out in the comments and as per this question, you could replace std::map, with std::unordered_map provided you do not need to keep elements in order.

And as per my experience, I always create such maps as static const. Therefore create them one time and use them many times to amortize the cost of creation.

  • 2
    @GuillaumeRacicot, I agree but if the map is static and created only once, the cost of using it is amortized over the lifetime of the program. No? – Duck Dodgers Feb 4 at 14:44
  • Yes, true. It would avoid copying and linear seach. – Guillaume Racicot Feb 4 at 14:47
  • Not rather std::unordered_map? – Aconcagua Feb 4 at 14:51
  • What's that kind of typedef syntax? GCC refuses to compile even with -std=c++17... – Aconcagua Feb 4 at 14:53
  • @Aconcagua, I didn't know about unordered_map. Saw this after your comment. Yes, probably unordered_map is a better option. – Duck Dodgers Feb 4 at 14:54
0

Assuming that you eventually want a std::string with the label in it, the question is whether to create them:

1: in to_string()
2: in its caller

Using Compiler Explorer it's pretty easy to find out.

Turns out (with recent compilers) that there's not a lot difference between the two. Returning const char * has a slight edge on std::string

1:

#include <string> 

char const * to_string(int code)
{
    switch (code)
    {
        case 0: return "foo";
        case 1: return "bar";
    }
}

std::string foo(int x)
{
    std::string s{to_string(x)};
    return s;    
}

2:

#include <string> 

std::string to_string2(int code)
{
    switch (code)
    {
        case 0: return "foo";
        case 1: return "bar";
    }
}


std::string foo2(int x)
{
    std::string s{to_string2(x)};
    return s;    
}

Note:

  • I needed to add foo() in order to stop the compiler optimising even more heavily....
  • In both cases, the strings are short and can use the short-string optimisation. Both clang and GCC have managed a heap-elision. This is seriously impressive - the compiler knows that to_string() never returns a string bigger than 4 bytes long and then eliminates the code that would dynamically allocate heap memory.

The conclusion seems to be that writing natural, and tidy code has little performance penalty.

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