6

I have a generic and recursive function but why it is not authorized in perl

sub pv($) {
    my ($vars) = @_;
    if(ref($vars) eq 'SNMP::Varbind') {
        return $vars->tag() . (defined($vars->iid()) ? '.' . $vars->iid() : '');
    } elsif (ref($vars) eq 'SNMP::VarList') {
        return join(', ', map { pv($_) } @$vars);
    } elsif(ref($vars) eq 'ARRAY') {
        return join('.', @{$vars});
    } else {
        return $vars;
    }
}

This error code "pv() called too early to check prototype" for this line return join(', ', map { pv($_) } @$vars);

  • 4
    Do you have to use the prototype though? Does it give you anything? – simbabque Feb 4 '19 at 16:11
8

Simple: forward declaration

sub pv($);
sub pv($) {
  • That would probably be a different question. I tried a few examples pv("test"), pv([1, 2, 3, 4]) & my $o = [[1, 2], [3, 4], [5, 6], [7, 8, 9]]; bless($o, 'SNMP::VarList'); pv($o); and get test, 1.2.3.4 & 1.2, 3.4, 5.6, 7.8.9, i.e. what I think the code should return. – Stefan Becker Feb 5 '19 at 9:15
1

On Perl 5.16+, you can use the current_sub feature:

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature 'current_sub';

sub pv($) {
  ...
  __SUB__->($_)
  ...
}

This is more useful when using anonymous subs, so that you don't create a memory cycle (as it would close over a reference to itself; this doesn't occur with named subs, since it just looks up the symbol).

Additionally, consider just not using a prototype. It's very likely that you don't need it, unless you know why you do; prototypes are for the parser, not the caller. Without the prototype, calling it with parentheses will be sufficient to delay the symbol lookup.

  • Thanks my version is 5.016003 – petitLynx Feb 5 '19 at 8:48

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