3

I have the following table in a yaml format:

:first_directory:
 :component1:
  - component1.c
  - component1.h
 :component2:
  :component2_A:
   :src:
    - component2_A.c
   :inc:
    - component2_A.h

When I print the content of the hash I get:

{:first_directory=>{:component1=>["component1.c", "component1.h"], :component2=>{:component2_A=>{:src=>["component2_A.c"], :inc=>["component2_A.h"]}}}}

Now I want to be able to create strings to concatenate all the possible values of a hash hierarchy and split it using a character. What I would like to generate are strings that look like this:

first_directory/component1/component1.c
first_directory/component1/component1.h
first_directory/component2/component2_A/src/component2_A.c
first_directory/component2/component2_A/inc/component2_A.h

What would be the cleanest and best way to achieve this?

  • 1
    What did you try? You probably need a recursive method. – Eric Duminil Feb 4 '19 at 16:47
  • 2
    I have no dispute with your choice of answer that you checkmarked (I upvoted it, and would have have given something similar had it not already been posted) but in future you may wish to wait awhile (at least a couple of hours, I would suggest) before making that decision. Quick selections may discourage other answers and sometimes are followed by the posting of clearly superior answers or comments that show the selected answer is incorrect. There's no rush to select an answer! – Cary Swoveland Feb 4 '19 at 19:06
5

This method should work best way:

def print_hash(hash_node, prev_string=nil)
  if hash_node.class == Array
    hash_node.each {|element| puts "#{prev_string}#{element}"}
  else # it is an inner hash
    hash_node.each do |key, value|
      print_hash(value, "#{prev_string}#{key}/")
    end
  end
end

print_hash(content_as_a_hash)

Test run:

content_as_a_hash = {:first_directory=>{:component1=>["component1.c", "component1.h"], :component2=>{:component2_A=>{:src=>["component2_A.c"], :inc=>["component2_A.h"]}}}}

print_hash(content_as_a_hash)    

Results:

first_directory/component1/component1.c
first_directory/component1/component1.h
first_directory/component2/component2_A/src/component2_A.c
first_directory/component2/component2_A/inc/component2_A.h
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    I had just put together such a similar answer, even down to the comment after the else :) Have a +1. – SRack Feb 4 '19 at 17:26
  • @SRack, it's really best way to get result :) Thank you! – Ivan Olshansky Feb 4 '19 at 17:30
  • 2
    For the benefit of @mareiou, the only difference I had was to replace both each with flat_map and remove the puts, in order to return an array of the strings if that's desired. – SRack Feb 4 '19 at 17:39
  • @engineersmnky, Is it possible hashes nested in Array in this data source? – Ivan Olshansky Feb 4 '19 at 17:48
3

As the YAML string uses indentation to indicate structure, you could obtain the desired result by operating on the string directly, employing a stack.

arr=<<_.lines
:first_directory:
 :component1:
  - component1.c
  - component1.h
 :component2:
  :component2_A:
   :src:
    - component2_A.c
   :inc:
    - component2_A.h
_
  #=> [":first_directory:\n",
  #    " :component1:\n",
  #    "  - component1.c\n",
  #    "  - component1.h\n",
  #    " :component2:\n",
  #    "  :component2_A:\n",
  #    "   :src:\n",
  #    "    - component2_A.c\n",
  #    "   :inc:\n",
  #    "    - component2_A.h\n"] 

def rollup(stack)
  stack.transpose.last.join('/')
end

stack = []

arr.each_with_object([]) do |line,arr|
  indent = line =~ /\S/
  line.gsub!(/[:\s-]/, '')
  if stack.any? && indent <= stack.last.first
    arr << rollup(stack)
    stack.select! { |ind,_| ind < indent }
  end
  stack << [indent, line]
end << rollup(stack)
  #=> ["first_directory/component1/component1.c", 
  #    "first_directory/component1/component1.h", 
  #    "first_directory/component2/component2_A/src/component2_A.c", 
  #    "first_directory/component2/component2_A/inc/component2_A.h"] 
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