646

Why doesn't a TRUNCATE on mygroup work? Even though I have ON DELETE CASCADE SET I get:

ERROR 1701 (42000): Cannot truncate a table referenced in a foreign key constraint (mytest.instance, CONSTRAINT instance_ibfk_1 FOREIGN KEY (GroupID) REFERENCES mytest.mygroup (ID))

drop database mytest;
create database mytest;
use mytest;

CREATE TABLE mygroup (
   ID    INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY
) ENGINE=InnoDB;

CREATE TABLE instance (
   ID           INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY,
   GroupID      INT NOT NULL,
   DateTime     DATETIME DEFAULT NULL,

   FOREIGN KEY  (GroupID) REFERENCES mygroup(ID) ON DELETE CASCADE,
   UNIQUE(GroupID)
) ENGINE=InnoDB;
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12 Answers 12

993

You cannot TRUNCATE a table that has FK constraints applied on it (TRUNCATE is not the same as DELETE).

To work around this, use either of these solutions. Both present risks of damaging the data integrity.

Option 1:

  1. Remove constraints
  2. Perform TRUNCATE
  3. Delete manually the rows that now have references to nowhere
  4. Create constraints

Option 2: suggested by user447951 in their answer

SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS = 0; 
TRUNCATE table $table_name; 
SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS = 1;
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  • 46
    @barjonah: actually, it might break data integrity (see stackoverflow.com/questions/5452760/…). So, what you call "light" in the real world is considered to be a bad practice. PS: thanks for the downvote – zerkms Nov 1 '12 at 2:59
  • 1
    Here is a very good way to find orphaned foreign keys (restore data integrity) http://stackoverflow.com/a/12085689/997776 – SandorRacz Feb 4 '15 at 13:26
  • disable foreign key before truncate is also a good way, i did it with success from source: stackoverflow.com/questions/8641703/… – Dung Jun 4 '16 at 3:32
  • 2
    @Dung disabling foreign key checks is only allowed in the development period. It breaks any existing relationships. zerkms is 100% right about data integrity. You can not disable foreign key checks on a working database unless you're planning to empty it completely (or at least all related tables) – NoobishPro Oct 4 '16 at 3:15
  • 1
    @Kamlesh it's not my solution, I adviced to not do it that barbaric way. – zerkms Nov 13 '19 at 20:14
1303

Yes you can:

SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS = 0;

TRUNCATE table1;
TRUNCATE table2;

SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS = 1;

With these statements, you risk letting in rows into your tables that do not adhere to the FOREIGN KEY constraints.

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  • 30
    do we have to set SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS=1; again afterwards? – vinc3m1 Apr 9 '12 at 21:29
  • 77
    No, you don't. The setting is only valid during the connection. As soon as you disconnect, the next connection will have it set back to 1. – The Pellmeister Jun 27 '12 at 8:07
  • 7
    This does not apply the 'ON DELETE' event in the referenced table, so this is not a complete answer. – Omer Sabic Oct 16 '12 at 9:09
  • 5
    If using in PHPMYADMIN, this works only if you use all the transactions in the same SQL window (separated by a ;). This is because each fresh web SQL call will reset the FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS to 1. – Sablefoste Oct 7 '13 at 21:17
  • 1
    Here is a very good way to find orphaned foreign keys (restore data integrity) in case you are interested http://stackoverflow.com/a/12085689/997776 – SandorRacz Feb 4 '15 at 13:27
172

I would simply do it with :

DELETE FROM mytest.instance;
ALTER TABLE mytest.instance AUTO_INCREMENT = 1;
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  • 5
    Smart. When you want to delete all records anyway, you might as well reset the auto increment. – winkbrace May 21 '15 at 8:53
  • 6
    This is obviously the best way to do it. No risk of losing constraints, just plain delete. It's worth noticing that DELETE performs slower than TRUNCATE. But since this action is usually performed only rarely, this does not matter. – phil294 Sep 12 '15 at 18:52
  • This is good if that's all you want to do, but DELETE can be absolutely brutal if you have too many rows - since it hits the logs, whereas TRUNCATE just rips the data out. Really depends on use case. – Jeff Feb 16 '16 at 4:13
  • 1
    when I'm using delete statement, it report error 1175: You are using safe update mode, just add SET SQL_SAFE_UPDATES = 0; then it's fine – tyan Apr 20 '16 at 2:41
  • When using this solution, it reports error 1175: You are using safe update mode,... change delete clause to DELETE FROM mydb.mytable where id != 0 makes it perfect. – Shihe Zhang Jul 17 '18 at 7:08
17

you can do

DELETE FROM `mytable` WHERE `id` > 0
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  • 1
    I tried it bur, the following error appeared:Error Code: 1142. DELETE command denied to user 'root'@'localhost' for table 'mytable' – AAEM Jul 10 '18 at 20:37
  • or just DELETE FROM mytable – Miloslav Milo Janoušek Aug 27 '19 at 13:10
  • This wouldn't reset the auto increment. – vivek_23 Sep 19 '19 at 10:36
13

As per mysql documentation, TRUNCATE cannot be used on tables with foreign key relationships. There is no complete alternative AFAIK.

Dropping the contraint still does not invoke the ON DELETE and ON UPDATE. The only solution I can ATM think of is to either:

  • delete all rows, drop the foreign keys, truncate, recreate keys
  • delete all rows, reset auto_increment (if used)

It would seem TRUNCATE in MySQL is not a complete feature yet (it also does not invoke triggers). See comment

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  • 7
    A note on your point about MySQL's TRUNCATE being incomplete - truncate isn't supposed to invoke triggers etc. If it did, it would just be the same as DELETE! It's row-agnostic, hence it's unable to perform row-related operations (like invoking triggers or examining foreign keys). It works in the same way in Oracle and Sql Server. – Simon MᶜKenzie Feb 18 '15 at 5:02
8

Easy if you are using phpMyAdmin.

Just uncheck Enable foreign key checks option under SQL tab and run TRUNCATE <TABLE_NAME>

enter image description here

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8

While this question was asked I didn't know about it, but now if you use phpMyAdmin you can simply open the database and select the table(s) you want to truncate.

  • At the bottom there is a drop down with many options. Open it and select Empty option under the heading Delete data or table.
  • It takes you to the next page automatically where there is an option in checkbox called Enable foreign key checks. Just unselect it and press the Yes button and the selected table(s) will be truncated.

Maybe it internally runs the query suggested in user447951's answer, but it is very convenient to use from phpMyAdmin interface.

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7

Tested on MYSQL Database

Solution 1:

SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS = 0;
TRUNCATE table1;

Solution 2:

DELETE FROM table1;
ALTER TABLE table1 AUTO_INCREMENT = 1;
TRUNCATE table1;

This works for me. I hope, this will help you also. Thanks for asking this question.

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6

Answer is indeed the one provided by zerkms, as stated on Option 1:

Option 1: which does not risk damage to data integrity:

  1. Remove constraints
  2. Perform TRUNCATE
  3. Delete manually the rows that now have references to nowhere
  4. Create constraints

The tricky part is Removing constraints, so I want to tell you how, in case someone needs to know how to do that:

  1. Run SHOW CREATE TABLE <Table Name> query to see what is your FOREIGN KEY's name (Red frame in below image):

    enter image description here

  2. Run ALTER TABLE <Table Name> DROP FOREIGN KEY <Foreign Key Name>. This will remove the foreign key constraint.

  3. Drop the associated Index (through table structure page), and you are done.

to re-create foreign keys:

ALTER TABLE <Table Name>
ADD FOREIGN KEY (<Field Name>) REFERENCES <Foreign Table Name>(<Field Name>);
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3

Just use CASCADE

TRUNCATE "products" RESTART IDENTITY CASCADE;

But be ready for cascade deletes )

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  • 3
    The OP tagged MySQL. While this is valid in Postgres, it is incorrect in MySQL. – Peter Sep 26 '19 at 9:30
1

If the database engine for tables differ you will get this error so change them to InnoDB

ALTER TABLE my_table ENGINE = InnoDB;
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0

Getting the old foreign key check state and sql mode are best way to truncate / Drop the table as Mysql Workbench do while synchronizing model to database.

SET @OLD_UNIQUE_CHECKS=@@UNIQUE_CHECKS, UNIQUE_CHECKS=0;
SET @OLD_FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS=@@FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS, FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS=0;`
SET @OLD_SQL_MODE=@@SQL_MODE, SQL_MODE='TRADITIONAL,ALLOW_INVALID_DATES';

DROP TABLE TABLE_NAME;
TRUNCATE TABLE_NAME;

SET SQL_MODE=@OLD_SQL_MODE;
SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS=@OLD_FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS;
SET UNIQUE_CHECKS=@OLD_UNIQUE_CHECKS;
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