536

Why doesn't a TRUNCATE on mygroup work? Even though I have ON DELETE CASCADE SET I get:

ERROR 1701 (42000): Cannot truncate a table referenced in a foreign key constraint (mytest.instance, CONSTRAINT instance_ibfk_1 FOREIGN KEY (GroupID) REFERENCES mytest.mygroup (ID))

drop database mytest;
create database mytest;
use mytest;

CREATE TABLE mygroup (
   ID    INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY
) ENGINE=InnoDB;

CREATE TABLE instance (
   ID           INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY,
   GroupID      INT NOT NULL,
   DateTime     DATETIME DEFAULT NULL,

   FOREIGN KEY  (GroupID) REFERENCES mygroup(ID) ON DELETE CASCADE,
   UNIQUE(GroupID)
) ENGINE=InnoDB;

10 Answers 10

784

You cannot TRUNCATE a table that has FK constraints applied on it (TRUNCATE is not the same as DELETE).

To work around this, use either of these solutions. Both present risks of damaging the data integrity.

Option 1:

  1. Remove constraints
  2. Perform TRUNCATE
  3. Delete manually the rows that now have references to nowhere
  4. Create constraints

Option 2: suggested by user447951 in their answer

SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS = 0; 
TRUNCATE table $table_name; 
SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS = 1;
  • 173
    Actually, sir, no. user447951 has showed us the light! – steve Nov 1 '12 at 2:33
  • 36
    @barjonah: actually, it might break data integrity (see stackoverflow.com/questions/5452760/…). So, what you call "light" in the real world is considered to be a bad practice. PS: thanks for the downvote – zerkms Nov 1 '12 at 2:59
  • 1
    Here is a very good way to find orphaned foreign keys (restore data integrity) http://stackoverflow.com/a/12085689/997776 – sanya Feb 4 '15 at 13:26
  • 1
    @Dung disabling foreign key checks is only allowed in the development period. It breaks any existing relationships. zerkms is 100% right about data integrity. You can not disable foreign key checks on a working database unless you're planning to empty it completely (or at least all related tables) – NoobishPro Oct 4 '16 at 3:15
  • 1
    The "risky solution" is better for a test enviroment where there is no need to worry about data integrity. – Artenes Nogueira Mar 9 '17 at 21:12
1162

Yes you can:

SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS = 0;

TRUNCATE table1;
TRUNCATE table2;

SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS = 1;

With these statements, you risk letting in rows into your tables that do not adhere to the FOREIGN KEY constraints.

  • 25
    do we have to set SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS=1; again afterwards? – vinc3m1 Apr 9 '12 at 21:29
  • 69
    No, you don't. The setting is only valid during the connection. As soon as you disconnect, the next connection will have it set back to 1. – Pelle ten Cate Jun 27 '12 at 8:07
  • 7
    This does not apply the 'ON DELETE' event in the referenced table, so this is not a complete answer. – Omer Sabic Oct 16 '12 at 9:09
  • 62
    +1 This is very handy during development when your data is already broken... – Cypher May 9 '13 at 22:37
  • 5
    If using in PHPMYADMIN, this works only if you use all the transactions in the same SQL window (separated by a ;). This is because each fresh web SQL call will reset the FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS to 1. – Sablefoste Oct 7 '13 at 21:17
133

I would simply do it with :

DELETE FROM mytest.instance;
ALTER TABLE mytest.instance AUTO_INCREMENT = 1;
  • 5
    Smart. When you want to delete all records anyway, you might as well reset the auto increment. – winkbrace May 21 '15 at 8:53
  • 5
    This is obviously the best way to do it. No risk of losing constraints, just plain delete. It's worth noticing that DELETE performs slower than TRUNCATE. But since this action is usually performed only rarely, this does not matter. – Blauhirn Sep 12 '15 at 18:52
  • This is good if that's all you want to do, but DELETE can be absolutely brutal if you have too many rows - since it hits the logs, whereas TRUNCATE just rips the data out. Really depends on use case. – Jeff Feb 16 '16 at 4:13
  • 1
    when I'm using delete statement, it report error 1175: You are using safe update mode, just add SET SQL_SAFE_UPDATES = 0; then it's fine – tyan Apr 20 '16 at 2:41
  • 1
    This is the only actual correct solution... The other solution introduce intergity dangers. – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Apr 9 '17 at 0:48
11

As per mysql documentation, TRUNCATE cannot be used on tables with foreign key relationships. There is no complete alternative AFAIK.

Dropping the contraint still does not invoke the ON DELETE and ON UPDATE. The only solution I can ATM think of is to either:

  • delete all rows, drop the foreign keys, truncate, recreate keys
  • delete all rows, reset auto_increment (if used)

It would seem TRUNCATE in MySQL is not a complete feature yet (it also does not invoke triggers). See comment

  • 6
    A note on your point about MySQL's TRUNCATE being incomplete - truncate isn't supposed to invoke triggers etc. If it did, it would just be the same as DELETE! It's row-agnostic, hence it's unable to perform row-related operations (like invoking triggers or examining foreign keys). It works in the same way in Oracle and Sql Server. – Simon MᶜKenzie Feb 18 '15 at 5:02
  • This comment is the best explanation that I found about why TRUNCATE cannot ignore or skip FK constraints. Thanks a lot Simon MᶜKenzie. I also don't agree with TRUNCATE not being "a complete feature": it is just its expected behavior in order to keep consistency. – Lucia Pasarin Sep 26 '15 at 10:22
  • @LuciaPasarin Well, Postgres did not have any problem with adding CASCADE to its TRUNCATE, so... – Jagger Dec 7 '17 at 9:07
10

you can do

DELETE FROM `mytable` WHERE `id` > 0
  • 1
    I tried it bur, the following error appeared:Error Code: 1142. DELETE command denied to user 'root'@'localhost' for table 'mytable' – AAEM Jul 10 '18 at 20:37
6

While this question was asked more than 5 years ago and I don't know this facility existed in MySql back then but now if you use phpmyadmin you can simply open the database and then select the table(s) you want to truncate. At the bottom there is a drop down with many options listed. Open it and select Empty option under the heading Delete data or table. It takes you to the next page automatically where there is an option in checkbox called Enable foreign key checks. Just unselect it and press Yes button and the selected table(s) will be truncated. May be it internally runs the query suggested in user447951's answer. But it is very convenient to use from phpmyadmin interface.

  • Worked like a charm form me thank you – Amir Hoseinian Jan 11 '17 at 9:09
  • 1
    Very good answer. – MarkSkayff Dec 17 '17 at 20:45
3

Answer is indeed the one provided by zerkms, as stated on Option 1:

Option 1: which does not risk damage to data integrity:

  1. Remove constraints
  2. Perform TRUNCATE
  3. Delete manually the rows that now have references to nowhere
  4. Create constraints

The tricky part is Removing constraints, so I want to tell you how, in case someone needs to know how to do that:

  1. Run SHOW CREATE TABLE <Table Name> query to see what is your FOREIGN KEY's name (Red frame in below image):

    enter image description here

  2. Run ALTER TABLE <Table Name> DROP FOREIGN KEY <Foreign Key Name>. This will remove the foreign key constraint.

  3. Drop the associated Index (through table structure page), and you are done.

to re-create foreign keys:

ALTER TABLE <Table Name>
ADD FOREIGN KEY (<Field Name>) REFERENCES <Foreign Table Name>(<Field Name>);
  • That helped me! Can you also tell me how to rebuild the constrain after removing it? – Bare Feet Feb 14 '18 at 10:09
1

Easy if you are using phpMyAdmin.

Just uncheck Enable foreign key checks option under SQL tab and run TRUNCATE <TABLE_NAME>

enter image description here

0

Getting the old foreign key check state and sql mode are best way to truncate / Drop the table as Mysql Workbench do while synchronizing model to database.

SET @OLD_UNIQUE_CHECKS=@@UNIQUE_CHECKS, UNIQUE_CHECKS=0;
SET @OLD_FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS=@@FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS, FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS=0;`
SET @OLD_SQL_MODE=@@SQL_MODE, SQL_MODE='TRADITIONAL,ALLOW_INVALID_DATES';

DROP TABLE TABLE_NAME;
TRUNCATE TABLE_NAME;

SET SQL_MODE=@OLD_SQL_MODE;
SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS=@OLD_FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS;
SET UNIQUE_CHECKS=@OLD_UNIQUE_CHECKS;
0

If the database engine for tables differ you will get this error so change them to InnoDB

ALTER TABLE my_table ENGINE = InnoDB;

protected by Ashwini Chaudhary Oct 4 '13 at 8:59

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