3

I have two strings

val a = "abc"
val b = "xyz"

I want to merge it and need output like below

axbycz

I added both strings to arraylist and then flatmap it

val c = listOf(a, b)

val d = c.flatMap {
    it.toList()
}

but not getting the desired result

12
0

Use the zip function. It creates a list of pairs with "adjacent" letters. You can then use joinToString with a transformer to create your final result.

a.zip(b) // Returns the list [(a, x), (b, y), (c, z)]
 .joinToString("") { (a, b) -> "$a$b" } // Joins the list back to a string with no separator
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Nice one. I didn't know zip acts directly over the string as an Iterable<Char>, like in many FP languages. I had a similar solution but I was doing a.toList() and b.toList(). – m0skit0 Feb 5 '19 at 12:03
  • 1
    @m0skit0 exactly my thought, really nice :) – Willi Mentzel Feb 5 '19 at 13:04
  • 3
    @m0skit0 Kotlin provides overloads for CharSequences. – Moira Feb 5 '19 at 13:41
3
0

You can always use a simple loop, assuming both strings have the same size. That way You only allocate a StringBuilder and counter variable, without any lists, arrays or pairs:

val a = "abc"
val b = "xyz"
val sb = StringBuilder()
for(i in 0 until a.length){
    sb.append(a[i]).append(b[i])
}
val d = sb.toString()
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  • 3
    Works but not idiomatic. This is Java written in Kotlin. – m0skit0 Feb 5 '19 at 14:11
  • @m0skit0 it is more efficient, but for small data set it's probably irrelevant. I ran this and accepted answer in JVM 10 million times - loop averaged 340ms, zip 840ms. With 184 char input string loop was 9.5sec, zip 31sec. – Pawel Feb 5 '19 at 15:27
  • @Pawel I had performance in mind too. Take a look at my answer – Willi Mentzel Feb 5 '19 at 15:32
  • 2
    @WilliMentzel I used to do it locally but if You want to see for yourself: playground. – Pawel Feb 5 '19 at 22:04
  • 1
    @Pawel I learned two things: mine is the slowest (i deleted my answer xD) and yours is the fastest, definitely so much faster that I would sacrifice readability for it (even though I think it's readability is good) :) thx for the benchmark +1 – Willi Mentzel Feb 5 '19 at 23:11
0
0

marstran's answer is really concise and Pawels answer is really fast. Using buildString you can have to best of both worlds:

buildString {
    a.zip(b).forEach { (a, b) ->
        append(a).append(b)
    }
}

buildString creates a StringBuilder and offers it as receiver in the lambda. It returns the built string.

Try it out here: Kotlin Playground. Thanks to Pawel for creating the original benchmark.

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