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If a travelling salesman problem is solved by using dynamic programming approach, will it provide feasible solution better than greedy approach?

I know that in terms of optimal solution, greedy algorithms are used for solving TSPs, but it becomes more complex and takes exponential time when numbers of vertices (i.e. cities) are very large.

So, in the end, which approach will be better?

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The greedy approach doesn't always give the optimal solution for the travelling salesman problem.

Example: A(0,0), B(0,1), C(2,0), D(3,1)
The salesman starts in A, B is 1 away, C is 2 away and D is 3.16 away.
The salesman goes to B which is closest, then C is 2.24 away and D is 3 away.
The salesman goes to C which is closest, then to D which is the last unvisited city then back to A.
The total trip A-B-C-D-A is 7.81 long. The trip A-B-D-C-A is 7.41 long which is shorter.

The dynamic solution is much slower but always give the optimal solution.

  • But don't you think that dynamic programming only works when you have a solution that is composed of multiple smaller solutions that get re-evaluated multiple times? – Tom Feb 5 at 15:51
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There is an important distinction between exact algorithms and heuristics. An exact algorithm is guaranteed to find the exact optimal solution. A heuristic is not, but it is designed to run quickly.

DP is an exact algorithm, at least as it is usually used. There are DP algorithms for TSP. Thus, these algorithms will solve the problem exactly.

The TSP cannot be solved exactly using greedy methods, hence any greedy method is a heuristic. By definition, therefore, DP will always find a better (or, no worse) feasible solution than a greedy heuristic will, for any instance of the TSP.

Note, however, that DP is not the dominant approach for solving TSP. Many other algorithms exist that are much more efficient. Some of the original papers on TSP used DP, and it is often formulated as an illustrative example, but it is not the way TSPs are usually solved in practice.

To correct something in the OP:

I know that in terms of optimal solution, greedy algorithms are used for solving TSPs, but it becomes more complex and takes exponential time when numbers of vertices (i.e. cities) are very large.

Greedy heuristics are sometimes used for solving TSPs. (These have names like nearest neighbor, cheapest insertion, etc.) As the number of vertices grows, the run time of those heuristics grows too, but it does not grow exponentially. Most of these heuristics have run times with low-order polynomial complexity, such as O(n^2).

On the other hand, because TSP is NP-hard, all known exact algorithms will have worst-case complexity that is exponential in the number of vertices. (Note that I say worst-case complexity -- actual run times may be quite reasonable for many instances, but only exponential in the worst case.)

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