2
    #include <iostream>
    #include<vector>
    using namespace std;

    class test{
        public:
        test(){
        cout<<"constructor called"<<endl;
    }
     test(const test& obj){
      cout<<"copy constructor called"<<endl;
     }
     test(test&& obj){
      cout<<"Move constructor called"<<endl;
    }     
    };
  int main()
  {
      vector<test> vec;
      vec.emplace_back(test());

      return 0;
  }

When i run above program I expected emplace_back to create object in vector in place.Thus "constructor called" should have been output since emplace_back would avoid creating temporary object.

But the output is:

constructor called
Move constructor called

Here, temporary object is created just like push_back. Please explain.

  • 7
    You create the object yourself with test(). Remove that. – tkausl Feb 6 at 4:17
3

emplace_back doesn't construct temporaries, but you constructed a temporary object explicitly by test(), then the new element is added to the vector from the temporary by the move constructor.

You can just

vec.emplace_back();
  • 2
    Thanks buddy! ..Got it. But If I want to add a test object which was already created before emplace_back then will emplace_back work same as push_back?? If yes then when should I use emplace_back?? only when I know constructor arguments? – bajirao Feb 6 at 4:57
  • @bajirao Yes and yes. If you already have the object then emplace_back and push_back work in same way. If you know the arguments accepted by the constructor of the class, and you don't want to construct the temporary object, then you could use emplace_back, which would construct the element in-place. – songyuanyao Feb 6 at 8:04
1

With emplace_back(test()) you already created an object outside of emplace_back and it has a move constructor so it is move-constructed. So you should call it without any argument for this case. Then you will not see any copy/move constructor calls.

vec.emplace_back(); // Will create a test object with constructor `test()` internally

To further understand, if your test class have more constructors, you can give emplace_back with those constructors. For example,

class test {
  ...
  test(int a, int b);
  test(const char* c);
};

And you can do this.

vec.emplace_back(1, 2);
vec.emplace_back("abcd");

This does not create redundant object which is cannot be done with push_back.

  • Thanks Hanjoung! ..Got it. But If I want to add a test object which was already created before emplace_back then will emplace_back work same as push_back?? If yes then when should I use emplace_back?? only when I know constructor arguments? – bajirao Feb 6 at 4:54
  • @bajirao Yes. In that case, both works same way. I think it is always good to use emplace_back as long as you are using C++11 or later. But still push_back is needed for legacy code compatibility. – Hanjoung Lee Feb 6 at 6:03
  • IMHO emplace_back was introduced from C++11 since it requires variadic templates. – Hanjoung Lee Feb 6 at 6:04
1

With emplace_back, the method already knows what class type that you're adding to your vector (you name it when initialising the vector), so the input arguments for emplace_back is only the arguments for the constructor that you want to call (typically you want to avoid the copy constructor, whose argument is an object of the same class):

struct A
{
    A (int a, int b, int c)
    {
    // do something
    }

    A (const A & other)
    {
    //do something else
    }
};

std::vector<A> array;

array . emplace_back (1, 2, 3);
// the above finds the constructor with these input arguments
// makes the new object within the vector - no copy

A obj (4, 5, 6);

array . emplace_back ( obj );
// the above looks for the constructor with this object (A)
// it finds a constructor (the copy constructor) and copies

array . emplace_back ( A (1,2,3) );
// the above first processes the inner part: making a new A object
// then searches for a constructor with that argument (an object A)
// in this case that's the copy constructor

In your case you were wanting to call a constructor with no arguments. This is why you want to use emplace_back() with no arguments to use this vector method correctly.

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