28

I want to let Typescript know that if the dbUser parameter passed to the function is not null, then that the result will not be null for sure.

type GetUser = (dbUser: DbUser | null) => GqlUser | null; 
const getUser: GetUser = (dbUser) => {
  if(!dbUser) return null;
  return ... //gql user
};

const dbUser = { ... some fields} //not null for sure
getUser(dbUser) //here I want typescript to know that the result will not be null

Basically, I know for sure that if dbUser parameter is not null, the result won't be either. How can I define the function in such a way? Currently, when I call the getUser function with non-null parameter, it still says that the result could be null, which I know for sure can't.

1
  • Hi! is it possible to you to use boolean values? (like using true or false). For me I prefer to avoid handling null values.
    – Alberto AM
    Feb 6, 2019 at 15:28

1 Answer 1

38

There are several options. You can use a function declaration with overloads:

function getUser(dbUser: null) : null;
function getUser(dbUser: DbUser) : GqlUser;
function getUser(dbUser: DbUser | null) : GqlUser | null;
function getUser(dbUser: DbUser | null): GqlUser | null {
    if(!dbUser) return null;
    return null! //gql user
} 

const dbUser =  null! as DbUser
getUser(dbUser) // GqlUser

You can also get overloads with the arrow function and type style but they look uglier:

type GetUser = {
    (dbUser: null) : null;
    (dbUser: DbUser) : GqlUser;
    (dbUser: DbUser | null) : GqlUser | null;
} 
const getUser = ((dbUser: DbUser | null): GqlUser | null => {
   if(!dbUser) return null;
   return null! //gql user
}) as GetUser 

const dbUser =  null! as DbUser
getUser(dbUser)

You could also use conditional types:

type GetUser = <T extends DbUser | null>(dbUser: T) => T extends DbUser ? GqlUser : null;
const getUser: GetUser = (dbUser) => {
    if (!dbUser) return null;
    return {} as any // assertions will be required to get a value into the conditioanl type 
};

const dbUser = null! as DbUser //not null for sure
getUser(dbUser)

I would recommend the first option, it's the cleanest and requires not type assertions unlike the other two.

4
  • Is there a way to export and import the function declarations from a separate file? I picked the 1st solution because it avoids the type assertions but a single file that used to be 200 lines, is going to become 500+ if not way more because now the declarations must stay before the functions.
    – ZenVentzi
    Feb 9, 2019 at 12:55
  • 1
    @ZenVentzi don't think there is a way, expect for writing your code in js and using a d.ts ... Feb 9, 2019 at 17:47
  • In the first example the third overload matches exactly the main function itself! why can't we avoid repetition here?
    – azerafati
    May 13, 2022 at 11:14
  • 1
    It's a great answer, but I don't think TS offers a satisfactory solution right now. For all three examples, the implementation function is not checked for the correct return types, and you can return null or string for any inputs.
    – Nate Glenn
    Feb 14, 2023 at 18:18

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.