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How can I send a pointer that´s in another module to a new module?

Hello, I´m just starting a Programming Proyect in c of a game for class. This game contains a struct called game that also contains differents types data like Players ir Objects. Those structs are identified by a long Id, classified so that the objects have an Id between #0 and #100 for example.

To make it easier I´ve been creating a function "what_id" that recibing just an Id it returns a pointer to the struct that corresponds to it. I know how by sending the 'game' struct where are contained all the ids, and an Id, return the variable, but there´re modules that do not use in any case that big 'game' variable, for example player.c.

How can I send 'game' to this function without having it?

typedef struct _Game{
  Player* player[MAX_PLAYERS + 1];
  Object* object[MAX_OBJECTS + 1];
  Space* spaces[MAX_SPACES + 1];
 T_Command last_cmd;
} Game;
  typedef struct _Object{
  Id id;
  char name[MAX_SPACES];
}

void* what_id(Game* game, Id id){
   if(id == NO_ID) return ERROR;
   if(0 <id<=MAX_SPACES){
      return what_space(game->space, id);
   }else if(MAX_SPACES<id<=(MAX_OBJECTS+MAX_SPACES)){
      return what_object(game->object, id);
   }else if((MAX_OBJECTS+MAX_SPACES<id<(MAX_PLAYERS+MAX_OBJECTS+MAX_SPACES)){
      return what_player(game->player, id);
   }else {
      fprinf(stderr,"Id asigment max stacked.";
      return ERROR;
    }
}
Space* what_space(const Space* space, Id id){
   int i;
   for(i=0;i<MAX_SPACES;i++){
       if(space[i]->id == id)return space[i];
   }
   fprintf(stderr, "Error no space_id %d founded", id);
   return ERROR;
}
2
  • 1
    If you need to get the Space instance in a module which only knows about spaces, why wouldn't you simply call what_space instead of what_id? It's much better since it's type-safe compared to getting a void*. It would also make more sense to have an object type enum and a separate ID, instead of having ranges of IDs for different object types. And I would certainly name those fields players, objects, etc. (i.e. plural) to make it obvious that they contain multiple items. And MAX_SPACES+1 doesn't seem right, why +1? Check out Code Review.
    – Groo
    Feb 7, 2019 at 11:34
  • Depending on the number of items in these lists, a hash table might be a more suited data structure, giving you O(1) object lookup.
    – Groo
    Feb 7, 2019 at 11:40

1 Answer 1

1

It's not clear what you mean by "module", or where Game is going to come from. If by modules you mean separate sources files that produce separate object files, there are generally two ways to do this.

The first is to declare a global variable and import it as an extern:

file1.c:

// declare struct
typedef struct {
    int value;
} Foo;

// declare global variable
Foo *globalfoo;

// declare external function from another module
void printfoo();

void main()
{
    Foo foo;
    foo.value = 3;
    globalfoo = &foo;
    printfoo();
}

file2.c:

#include <stdio.h>

// declare struct
typedef struct {
    int value;
} Foo;

// declare variable from another module
extern Foo *globalfoo;

void printfoo()
{
    printf("foo: %d\n", globalfoo->value);
}

The other way to do it is to pass it via a function argument:

file1.c:

typedef struct {
    int value;
} Foo;

void printfoo(Foo *foo);

void main()
{
    Foo foo;
    foo.value = 3;
    printfoo(&foo);
}

file2.c:

#include <stdio.h>

typedef struct {
    int value;
} Foo;

void printfoo(Foo *foo)
{
    printf("foo: %d\n", foo->value);
}

You can avoid re-declaring structs and functions in multiple source files by putting them in a header file and #including it:

myproject.h:

typedef struct {
    int value;
} Foo;

void printfoo(Foo *foo);

file1.c:

#include <myproject.h>

void main()
{
    Foo foo;
    foo.value = 3;
    printfoo(&foo);
}

file2.c:

#include <myproject.h>
#include <stdio.h>

void printfoo(Foo *foo)
{
    printf("foo: %d\n", foo->value);
}

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