1

I've got a text input with several group of lines. Each group is separated by an empty line (\n\n). I'm processing with sed, but I'm open to alternatives.

I'm using this construct for being able to process all the lines at once:

# if the first line copy the pattern to the hold buffer
1h
# if not the first line then append the pattern to the hold buffer
1!H
# if the last line then ...
$ {
  # copy from the hold to the pattern buffer
  g

  ... here are my regex lines.

  # print
  p
}

My target output for every group is every line but the first prefixed with the content of the first line seperated by a space.

Since my current input only had groups of 2, 3 and 6 lines, I "hardcoded" it like that:

2 lines: s/\n\n\([^\n]\+\)\n\([^\n]\+\)\n\n/\n\n\1 \2\n\n/g

3 lines: s/\n\n\([^\n]\+\)\n\([^\n]\+\)\n\([^\n]\+\)\n\n/\n\n\1 \2\n\n\1 \3\n\n/g

6 lines: s/\n\n\([^\n]\+\)\n\([^\n]\+\)\n\([^\n]\+\)\n\([^\n]\+\)\n\([^\n]\+\)\n\([^\n]\+\)\n\n/\n\n\1 \2\n\n\1 \3\n\n\1 \4\n\n\1 \5\n\n\1 \6\n\n/g

(I have every one of those regex lines twice, since the ending \n\n of one group might be needed and not available for matching the next group's beginning)

I'm searching for a generic way that works for groups of any size from 2 to n lines. Anyone got any ideas for that?

UPDATE: since @Benjamin W. requested sample input / output:

The real problem I'm trying to solving here is to dynamically generate a csv header line for a temperature logging daemon sourced with data from sensors -u. (because the output's order seems to change when power cycling my laptop)

With sed it was quite easy to get from the original programs output to this:

jc42-i2c-0-1a SMBus I801 adapter at f040
temp1

asus-isa-0000 ISA adapter
cpu_fan
temp1

acpitz-acpi-0 ACPI interface
temp1

jc42-i2c-0-18 SMBus I801 adapter at f040
temp1

coretemp-isa-0000 ISA adapter
Package id 0
Core 0
Core 1
Core 2
Core 3

The 3 sed regex replace lines I mentioned above alows me to transform that into this:

jc42-i2c-0-1a SMBus I801 adapter at f040 temp1
asus-isa-0000 ISA adapter cpu_fan
asus-isa-0000 ISA adapter temp1
acpitz-acpi-0 ACPI interface temp1
jc42-i2c-0-18 SMBus I801 adapter at f040 temp1
coretemp-isa-0000 ISA adapter Package id 0
coretemp-isa-0000 ISA adapter Core 0
coretemp-isa-0000 ISA adapter Core 1
coretemp-isa-0000 ISA adapter Core 2
coretemp-isa-0000 ISA adapter Core 3

But that will of course only work on machines with adapters that have 1, 2 or 5 values each.

UPDATE 2019-02-11:

So after I got two answers suggesting generic solutions I looked at this problem again and simplified my whole temperature logging script quite a bit:

echo -n "timestamp"
sensors -u | # -u gives Raw output, suitable for easier post-processing
grep --invert-match '  ' | # remove all lines containing values, leaving only headers
sed -n 'H; ${x; s/\nAdapter: / /g; p}' | # join headers spanning two lines together. For syntax see: https://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/163428/replace-a-string-containing-newline-characters & http://www.grymoire.com/Unix/Sed.html#uh-55
sed 'N;/\n$/d;s/\(.*\)\n\(.*\):/\1 \2\n\1/;P;$d;D' | # join the headers header with each sub-header, see: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/54576948/sed-regex-group-repeat-option
tr '\n' ';' | sed 's/.$//' # join finished headers together in a single line sepearted by ; & remove the trailing ;
echo ""

while true
do
    ts=`date +"%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S"`
    echo -n "$ts;"
    sensors -u | grep --invert-match '_max\|_crit\|_min' | # remove min max crit values which represent config, not state.
    grep '\.' | # remove all non value lines left (headers & empty lines seperating blocks
    sed 's/  .*: //g' | # remove value names, leaving only the values themselfs
    sed 's/\.000//g' | # remove empty decimals
    tr '\n' ';' | sed 's/.$//' # join finished values together in a single line sepearted by ; & remove the trailing ;
    sleep 1
    echo ""
done
  • awk RS="\n\n"? – tripleee Feb 7 at 15:56
  • gives me syntax error.. sorry but I have no experience with awk, you gotta give me more than that. – kaefert Feb 7 at 16:15
  • That's just a search term for you. We can't know exactly what you are trying to do but awk -v RS="\n\n" '{ something with each block }' sounds vagely like what you are looking for. – tripleee Feb 7 at 16:17
  • @tripleee For blank line separated records, you can use RS = "" (see manual). – Benjamin W. Feb 7 at 16:25
  • Can you add example input and output? – Benjamin W. Feb 7 at 16:28
2

This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed 'N;/\n$/d;s/\(.*\)\n\(.*\)/\1 \2\n\1/;P;$d;D' file

Append the next line to the current line.

If the appended line is empty i.e. \n$ denotes an empty line, delete the pattern space entirely and resume as if no lines have been consumed.

Otherwise, the two lines in the pattern space are both non-empty, so convert the two lines into one and then append the first line to the result.

Print the first of the lines in the pattern space.

If it is the last line of the file delete the pattern space.

Delete the first of the lines in the pattern space.

Repeat.

N.B. The D deletes the first line in the pattern space and does not implicitly replace the pattern space with the next line if the pattern space is not empty.

  • Thanks for this solution! Very compact and uses the tool I asked for, though the awk solution is a bit more readable even to my eyes where I have some experience with sed and nearly none with awk. One problem though is that both your solutions print the first line of the last block again after finishing the last block. – kaefert Feb 11 at 10:19
  • @kaefert Oops!. Forgot to delete the last line. – potong Feb 11 at 13:24
  • brilliant, thanks! – kaefert Feb 11 at 13:28
2

This works as awk solution:

awk 'BEGIN {RS="\n\n"; FS="\n"} {for (i = 2; i <= NF; i++) print $1,$i}' file
  • define "\n\n" as record seperator (RS)
  • define "\n" as field seperator (FS)
  • for every field in each record from second to the last (NF): print the first field ($1) and the current field ($i), concattenated by the OFS, triggered by ","
  • thanks for your solution and with explanation what is happening! great! What looks a bit strange to my eyes is the +i++ part in the loop. (Could you explain what it does?) Also (just as @potong 's solution) it prints the first line of the last block again after finishing the last block. – kaefert Feb 11 at 10:17
  • I've tried this, but it didn't fix the problem: awk 'BEGIN {RS="\n\n"; FS="\n"; OFS="\n"} {if (NF > 1) {for (i = 2; i <= NF;+i++) print $1 " " $i}}' – kaefert Feb 11 at 10:44
  • 1
    Hi kaefert, the additinal + in front of the i is a typo, which apparently had no effect. I removed it. – eraenderer Feb 11 at 12:32
  • I think the additional printing in the last block is because of a newline at the end of the last line before end of file in your input file. The code behaves correctly, because you have an empty field as last element. Have a look here to adjust your input with common editors. – eraenderer Feb 11 at 12:35
  • ah, you're right, thanks! – kaefert Feb 11 at 12:56

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